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If the rental property is under my name, can I collect rent under the LLC business account?

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Eve W.

Wholesaler from Sugar Land, Texas

May 22 '13, 09:14 AM


The deed is under my own name since I am personally liable for the loan.

Can I have my tenant make the rent payment into my LLC business account? thanks



Michael Siekerka Verified

Real Estate Investor from Louisville, Kentucky

May 22 '13, 09:53 AM


Yes, you can do that. You should also be able to deposit checks made out to you directly into your LLC bank account. I have a property owned in one LLC, all checks are made out to me and I deposit to an account with a different LLC. I've never had any problems.

If you're worried about liability then money-handling isn't going to matter if the property isn't deeded to the LLC.

-Michael



Website: http://www.RinnovateKY.com
Michael Siekerka, Rinnovate LLC


Dawn Anastasi Verified Moderator

Real Estate Investor from Milwaukee, Wisconsin

May 22 '13, 10:37 AM


I do this too, in order to keep everything related to the property completely separate from my personal funds.



Website: http://www.coreprop.biz/
"If it makes dollars, it makes sense."


Will Spruill

Seattle, Washington

May 22 '13, 12:12 PM


Why do you have the LLC? I ask this since most LLC theories are to limit liability is a buisness or property. If you own the property in your personal name then liability rest on you for the building.



Eve W.

Wholesaler from Sugar Land, Texas

May 24 '13, 09:04 AM


If my name is on the deed instead of the LLC, can I sign the lease contract with the LLC name instead my name and have the tenants deposit the monthly rent into the LLC business checking account?

Originally posted by Michael Siekerka:
Yes, you can do that. You should also be able to deposit checks made out to you directly into your LLC bank account. I have a property owned in one LLC, all checks are made out to me and I deposit to an account with a different LLC. I've never had any problems.

If you're worried about liability then money-handling isn't going to matter if the property isn't deeded to the LLC.

-Michael



Michael Siekerka Verified

Real Estate Investor from Louisville, Kentucky

May 24 '13, 05:11 PM


Eve Zhao - You can put whatever you want on the lease and put the money wherever you want (or have the tenants do so). The only benefits of doing this are

1. you might sound slightly more professional (but much less personable)
2. it may be easier to keep your personal finances separate from your "business" finances

Keep in mind that taking this approach does not limit your liability in any way. If a tenant were to get injured because of owner neglect, they'd still be able to sue you, the owner for whatever their lawyer(s) would like to go after including personal assets.



Website: http://www.RinnovateKY.com
Michael Siekerka, Rinnovate LLC


Pat L.

Real Estate Investor from New York

May 25 '13, 04:35 AM


I would definitely get title out of your name.
QC it to the LLC & get large $ liability ins on it
But hold the mtg note assuming it's free & clear in your name to strip the equity.



Rob K

Real Estate Investor from Michigan

May 25 '13, 05:51 AM


I don't see why you couldn't have a management agreement between yourself and your LLC. Your LLC would manage the property for you, sign the lease, and collect rents. The LLC would then pay the owner (you) anything left after expenses.



Bill G.

Real Estate Investor from Springfield, Missouri

May 26 '13, 04:28 AM
4 votes


I caught some flak yesterday about not being positive with new folks, so here is my positive spin.

Sure, you can do all of that!

Now, I'll work my way from the bottom up;

Rob, You can do that, so long as your state real estate commission allows it, if your LLC is a seperate entity from you then your company doesn't own the property. For a company to have a property management agreement to manage properties for others, a real estate license can be required. See response to Eve.

Pat, I was about to vote you up on that until I read about the equity stripping ploy, bogus notes will be shot through like Grant going through Richmond.

Eve, title is not in the LLC name and it has no rights to lease property it has no interest in, your lease is invalid. Lease the proprty to the LLC and then do a sandwich lease, having the LLC sub-let the property.

Michael, yes, you can deposit checks in your name since the bank accepts the deposit, the bank is not responsible for you to do anything correctly. Comingling funds goes in both directions, depositing personal money in the LLC as income can also bring questions of why income from a personally held property is being washed through a company, money laundering for any tax advantage, is that the reason? Or, is it being wash through to show income to an LLC that is personal income for financing purposes?
Again, use a lease to the company and sub-let, if checks are made out in your name, use an endorsement on the back of the check: Pay to the order of XYZ, LLC., then endorse the check by the LLC and deposit it.

Will, good point, the liability goes to the one in title. If the company provides some service or function that causes an issue, both the company and individual are at risk. The company is still at risk by holding property in your name as you are liable and the company is your personal asset since you own it.

Dawn, you're in the same boat, sub-let the property.

Wheeew, I'd say I got thrung that on a more positive note... (LOL) :)



Rob K

Real Estate Investor from Michigan

May 26 '13, 06:12 AM


Originally posted by Bill Gulley:
Rob, You can do that, so long as your state real estate commission allows it, if your LLC is a seperate entity from you then your company doesn't own the property. For a company to have a property management agreement to manage properties for others, a real estate license can be required. See response to Eve.

In my state, it would be perfectly legal. It's also legal to have an unlicensed person who works for you to manage YOUR property. The only time a license would be needed is if someone os collecting a fee to manage property owned by another person.



Bill G.

Real Estate Investor from Springfield, Missouri

May 26 '13, 06:39 AM


Pretty much the way it is in all states, employees don't need a license. A company can not be an employee. :)



Chris Martin

Real Estate Investor from Holly Springs, North Carolina

May 26 '13, 08:13 AM


Originally posted by Rob K:
Originally posted by Bill Gulley:
Rob, You can do that, so long as your state real estate commission allows it, if your LLC is a seperate entity from you then your company doesn't own the property. For a company to have a property management agreement to manage properties for others, a real estate license can be required. See response to Eve.

In my state, it would be perfectly legal. It's also legal to have an unlicensed person who works for you to manage YOUR property. The only time a license would be needed is if someone os collecting a fee to manage property owned by another person.

Yes, there are two entites at play (LLC, individual). In many (most?) states, like NC, the definition of broker includes words like "a broker is ...an person or entity who for a compensation or valuable consideration or promise thereof ..." that allow an "out" for cases like Eve's. I have on occasion shown, advertised, and even once helped in negotiation for other people's property..., but without consideration (explicit or implicit) and without a license. Not an issue in my state, but I think this isn't true everywhere.



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