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Landlord Friendly states?

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Eliott G.

Real Estate Investor

Jun 07 '09, 02:21 PM


I was reading about different laws in different states for landlords and tenants...

Can anyone tell me which states are the MOST landlord friendly and what states are the LEAST landlord friendly?

From what I can find New England and California are some of the LEAST friendly?
Anyone have some thoughts/details/experiences on this subject?


Edited Jun 26 2010, 08:29


Harrison Painter

from Indianapolis, Indiana

Jun 07 '09, 02:29 PM
1 vote


Indiana has been good to us.

We do not have the horror stories that I hear about from California and Washington DC.


Edited Jun 26 2010, 08:29


Eliott G.

Real Estate Investor

Jun 07 '09, 02:36 PM


Harrison -

I guess that is what I was getting at...everything I read so far has stated Indiana is one of the better states for landlord...any others?


Edited Jun 26 2010, 08:29


Richard Warren

Real Estate Investor from Las Vegas, Nevada

Jun 07 '09, 02:41 PM


Nevada is not bad. New York is awful.

:cool:


Edited Jun 26 2010, 08:29


Michael Rossi

Real Estate Investor from Ohio

Jun 07 '09, 09:06 PM


Ohio is good.

As a general rule of thumb, the more socialist a state is (can you say "coasts"), the more unfriendly they are to landlords (and business in general). Flyover county - generally good.

Mike


Edited Jun 26 2010, 08:29


Aly L

Real Estate Investor from Middletown, New Jersey

Jun 07 '09, 09:58 PM


My friend is a landlord in Kentucky and they are definitely pro-landlord.


Edited Jun 26 2010, 08:29


Tim W. Donor

Inspector from Tampa, FL

Jun 09 '09, 11:37 AM
1 vote


Look at an electoral map for Bush 43's re-election. Find the red ones. Start there.

I'll respond to your pm about Indiana Elliott.


Edited Jun 26 2010, 08:30 by Tim W.


Steve Might

Real Estate Investor from Fenton, Michigan

Jun 14 '09, 09:11 AM


Don’t forget to consider the local property taxes. I have found they can eat up profits quickly, and they vary in different communities within a state.


Edited Jun 26 2010, 08:35


Scott M.

Real Estate Investor from Rochester Hills, Michigan

Jun 14 '09, 10:01 AM


The majority of MI is good - some cities you have to look out for like Pontiac MI - but Detroit is actually very pro - landlord - actually they are very fair in my opinion - I don't think they lean either way. If your an A$$ of a landlord you won't win and if your tenant is one - they won't win.

A shock I know considering Mike's comments and the political history of the city.


Edited Jun 26 2010, 08:35


Brandon Schlichter

Real Estate Investor from Circleville, Ohio

Jun 16 '09, 10:48 AM


I second Mike's opinion of Ohio, I hear stories from CA/NY landlords, and I can't fathom why anyone owns properties in those states.

Furthermore, in Ohio, different counties/cities can be a monster all their own, some counties close to me do rather fast evictions, some seem to drag their feet.


Edited Jun 26 2010, 08:37


Eric Wang

Real Estate Investor from San Jose, California

Jun 18 '09, 02:36 AM


The California Fair Housing can be very complicated.


Edited Jun 26 2010, 08:38


Mark Yuschak

Real Estate Investor from Grand Blanc, Michigan

Jun 18 '09, 03:04 AM


I second what Scott says about Michigan. I have rentals in the city of Flint and don't have many problems. If you follow the rules, you won't have issues. As soon as you start trying to pull funny stuff you'll have problems to deal with. But, that could be said about investing anywhere...


Edited Jun 26 2010, 08:38


J Padawan

Real Estate Investor from Poway, California

Jul 16 '09, 01:45 PM
1 vote


I know first hand that Ohio is cool, but the tenant doesn't pay utilities, so this will sneak up and crack you in the back of the head. MS, Jackson, MS to be exact is one of my favorite states. Easier than TX (in my opinion) to evict, if you can believe that. I can have a tenant esc :roll: orted out by the police within 3 weeks or less if I stay on top of the paper work and filings. Tenant pays all utilities!! ALL! HA And the bills follow the tenants. Little details.


Edited Jun 26 2010, 09:00


Michael Rossi

Real Estate Investor from Ohio

Jul 16 '09, 09:47 PM
1 vote


I know first hand that Ohio is cool, but the tenant doesn't pay utilities, so this will sneak up and crack you in the back of the head.

I'm not sure what you meant here, but my tenants certainly pay their utilities. I would never buy a property if I were paying gas and/or electric.

Mike


Edited Jun 26 2010, 09:00


Mark N.A

Real Estate Investor from North Carolina

Jul 17 '09, 12:26 AM
2 votes


Almost as important as state laws are local codes, regulations and neighborhood organizations.

Don't invest in Historic Districts. See how active any neighborhood associations are. Who gets fined if your tenant's yard violates city codes?

Around here no more than 3 unrelated people can live in a house. Do they enforce that on the other side of the tracks? NO. Around here driveways cannot be dirt. Do they enforce that on the other side of the tracks? NO.

We have one magistrate who leans over backwards to give tenants the benefit of the doubt. We have another magistrate who is ZERO TOLERANCE.

Know your neighborhoods. Know your bureaucrats. Know your residents.


Edited Jun 26 2010, 09:00


Sandra Sunshine

Homeowner from Massachusetts

Aug 27 '09, 02:55 AM


I believe Massachusetts is the least friendly state to landlords. Some states have laws that address threats from tenants, and I believe the laws need to be amended to address this in Massachusetts.

There is no protection from threatening tenants and it is a nightmare to get them out unless they don't pay.

Sandra


Edited Jun 26 2010, 09:30


Dave A

Residential Real Estate Broker from Los Angeles, California

Sep 10 '09, 09:08 AM


Nevada is landlord friendly as long as you know how to present your case before the judge.


Edited Jun 26 2010, 09:40


Jimmy H.

Aug 22 '10, 10:13 PM


Originally posted by MikeOH:
I know first hand that Ohio is cool, but the tenant doesn't pay utilities, so this will sneak up and crack you in the back of the head.


I'm not sure what you meant here, but my tenants certainly pay their utilities. I would never buy a property if I were paying gas and/or electric.


Mike



Mike,

Assuming you up the rents accordingly, to cover the cost of utilities and effectively "re-billing" the utilities, why would you "never" buy a property where gas and electric were paid by the landlord? Also it can provide a value add opportunity in some situations to get it switched. - Just wondering what your logic is here.



Account Closed

Aug 23 '10, 03:36 AM


Washington & Oregon are definitely not landlord friendly states. Sounds like another reason to consider moving to Texas.



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