BiggerPockets


The neighbor keeps calling the police on my tenant

Forum Powered By:

18 posts by 12 users

To participate in forum discussions, create a free account or login.

Cheryl C.

Residential Landlord from Washington, DC

Apr 08 '13, 08:28 AM


I am losing an excellent tenant due to the adjacent owner continually calling the police complaining of noise violations. He has called 5 times so far this year. My tenant is a middle-aged Hispanic woman. He contacted me early this year and I went over to talk to him and then my tenant. I do not believe there is any noise (radio) violation. After another visit from the Sheriff on Saturday, she has had it. I don't blame her.

I called the Sheriff this am and was told that different deputies had responded on the various occasions. These complaints were all filed mid-afternoon and no citation was ever issued. I was told that it is SOP for the deputy to knock on the door of the "offending party", regardless if they hear any noise or not.

This behavior starting shortly after my tenant moved in in December. The place is beautifully decorated and spotless. When she moved in, she told me that she never wanted to move. I am really angry as I believe it's racial. My prior tenant was awful and he never complained.

What, if anything, would you do? I plan to talk further with the Sheriff's Office, but my tenant IS leaving.



Karen Margrave Moderator

Developer from Orange County, California

Apr 08 '13, 08:50 AM
3 votes


Go talk to an attorney, and the sheriffs office. That's harassment. The Sheriffs Office needs to tell the woman to stop calling to report something that isn't a violation of the law. This is causing you financial losses and it cannot be tolerated. A lawsuit against the woman may be necessary.



Karen Margrave, Parlay Investments, 1st American Construction
E-Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: 949-933-3955
Website: http://www.themargravegroup.com
PARLAY: definition: to increase or otherwise transform into something of much greater value


Tevis Verrett

Private Money Lender from Woodland Hills, California

Apr 08 '13, 09:17 AM
1 vote


I agree with @Karen Margrave, be your tenants knight!

Look in your area for nonprofits that are guardians stamping down racial injustice and harassment. Contact the fair housing authority.

Once she sees that you are your brother's keeper. . . Not only do you gain a lifelong tenant; you will also have an grateful fan.

Help her cowboy up, and if necessary lawyer up!

Tevis



Karen Margrave Moderator

Developer from Orange County, California

Apr 08 '13, 10:03 AM
2 votes


@Cheryl C. It's not being your brothers keeper, as much as it's protecting your assets. People like that have no right to use tax dollars to harass innocent people, and that's exactly the way you should frame it with the Sheriffs Department. Call and speak to the head of the Sheriffs Dept. They do not have to go out on calls like that, they can tell the woman to stop unless it's a matter of public safety.

We bought 20 acres and built a house where our son and friends could ride motorcycles. We installed huge sprinklers to keep down the dust. The noise was minimal, as we only allowed 2 riders at a time (they are freestyle riders that do the dangerous tricks you see on tv). We had one person blocks away that used to call the Sheriff and complain. After they came out they realized what was going on and told the person to stop calling. She then began calling other agencies, and had them come out. None found any problems. You cannot allow people to erode your rights for their entertainment. If she thinks it's too loud, she needs to move, not your tenants. Actually, after the sheriff saw what was going on, he used to come by to watch the boys practice their jumps.



Karen Margrave, Parlay Investments, 1st American Construction
E-Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: 949-933-3955
Website: http://www.themargravegroup.com
PARLAY: definition: to increase or otherwise transform into something of much greater value


Ryan M.

West, Michigan

Apr 08 '13, 10:52 AM


And who is going to pay for a lawsuit?



Randy F.

Contractor from Anchorage, Alaska

Apr 08 '13, 11:06 AM
1 vote


Do you know any bikers? Have a half a dozen Harleys roll up on the neighbors lawn and rev em up for five minutes. They then knock on the door and tell neighbor that they heard your place might be going up for rent and just wanna know if this is a nice QUIET neighborhood! :c)



Rob K

Real Estate Investor from Michigan

Apr 08 '13, 11:49 AM
1 vote


I would call the tenant and let her know that you're on her side and you are going to do your best to put a stop to this. If you have a lease (other than month to month) with her, I would remind her that she signed a lease and it's a valid contract that she needs to honor.

Next, I would go to the police staion and let them know what is going on. Often times, the officer who is going to the door is doing so, because he got all C's in high school. They are often full of bad advice. You need to talk to the desk sergeant and explain exactly what is going on. They should be able to stop sending officers to the house over petty BS.

If that doesn't work, I would talk to the neighbor and threaten legal action. If that doesn't stop this problem, it might be time to hire a biker. They sometimes fill an empty void in society. If you pay some big, ugly, inked up biker to take care of this, it could be money well spent. Your neighbor is playing dirty. Might be time operate outside of the law.



Chuck Redman

Real Estate Agent from Pearland, Texas

Apr 08 '13, 12:10 PM


Originally posted by Randy F.:
Do you know any bikers? Have a half a dozen Harleys roll up on the neighbors lawn and rev em up for five minutes. They then knock on the door and tell neighbor that they heard your place might be going up for rent and just wanna know if this is a nice QUIET neighborhood! :c)

I've got friends in Low Places!!



James Hiddle

Wholesaler from Altus, Oklahoma

Apr 08 '13, 02:51 PM


Originally posted by Randy F.:
Do you know any bikers? Have a half a dozen Harleys roll up on the neighbors lawn and rev em up for five minutes. They then knock on the door and tell neighbor that they heard your place might be going up for rent and just wanna know if this is a nice QUIET neighborhood! :c)

That is so fricking evil haha :)



James Hiddle

Wholesaler from Altus, Oklahoma

Apr 08 '13, 02:53 PM


Or you can have someone pull up blaring heavy metal music out loud and say is the property next door up for rent?



Karen Margrave Moderator

Developer from Orange County, California

Apr 08 '13, 03:09 PM


@Ryan M. Who will pay for it? The woman that keeps calling the sheriff for no reason and causes the owner of the neighboring property to lose her income. The point is, once she grasps that there are consequences to her petty behavior, more than likely she will stop it. If it is allowed to continue, it will.

@Randy F. I'm with you.



Karen Margrave, Parlay Investments, 1st American Construction
E-Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: 949-933-3955
Website: http://www.themargravegroup.com
PARLAY: definition: to increase or otherwise transform into something of much greater value


Fran Flanagan

North Wales, Pennsylvania

Apr 08 '13, 06:08 PM


Does the neighbor have any code violations?

My township has strict laws on height of grass, no cracks on sidewalks, trees need to be trimmed to 10 feet above sidewalks and 14 feet above street. I would file some complaints back.

I like the idea of calling some local minority rights activists. Any family friend lawyers or friend of friend? But them dinner for a letter. It's likely to me that a strongly worded letter from a third party will put an end to this crap.



Cheryl C.

Residential Landlord from Washington, DC

Apr 08 '13, 06:46 PM
1 vote


@Chuck Redman...where the whisky flows and the beer chases!

All, thanks for the replies. I am waiting to talk to the Deputy on Wednesday when he is back at work.



Ryan M.

West, Michigan

Apr 08 '13, 10:17 PM


Let me know how the neighbor paying the lawsuit works after it is finished. Lol



Joe B.

Real Estate Investor from Sacramento, California

Apr 08 '13, 11:32 PM


I agree that a bunch of legalese from an attorney may be enough to get the neighbor to back off.



Steve Might

Real Estate Investor from Fenton, Michigan

Apr 09 '13, 06:03 PM


Every time an officer is dispatched to an address it is logged. Officers being sent to that address will be advised by the dispatcher that there are already many calls from this particular complainant. So the police are probably already well aware that this is an issue.



(Don't Want to See This? Log in or Create a Free BiggerPockets.com Account!)

Ubg-book

Get the Free eBook from BiggerPockets

Get The Ultimate Beginner's Guide to Real Estate Investing for FREE - read by more than 100,000 people - AND get exclusive real estate investing tips, tricks, and techniques delivered straight to your inbox twice weekly!

  • Actionable Advice for Getting Started,
  • Discover the 10 Most Lucrative Real Estate Niches,
  • Learn how to get started with or without money,
  • Explore Real-Life Strategies for Building Wealth,
  • And a LOT more!

Sign up below to download the eBook for FREE today!

We hate spam just as much as you


To post a reply or start a new discussion, create a free account or login.

Manage Keyword Alerts

View All Forums