Real Estate Investing Basics

Wholesalers & Flippers: Here’s Where the Real Money Is in Real Estate

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Aerial view of of a residential neighborhood in Hawthorne, in Los Angeles, CA

There are endless articles, podcasts, and TV shows out there about how to make money in real estate with little to no money of your own. Most of these talk about wholesaling or flipping with hard money. This appeals to a lot of people who believe their lives will be better if they quit their day job and enter the world of real estate full-time.

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I am one of these people.

I grew up working in and around my parents’ rental properties and working construction. I went to college, got a degree, and found a “real job” in telecom sales. I worked hard and made good money. But ultimately, I wasn’t happy.

After some reflection, I was determined to re-enter the world of real estate. Given my sales experience, I wanted to become a real estate broker. This allowed me to simultaneously make a living and see opportunities firsthand. When I had enough money, I started investing in my own deals.

Making a Living vs. Investing in Real Estate

There are many ways to make money in real estate. You can wholesale, fix and flip, develop, broker properties, and more. If you don’t like your day job or you don’t have a job, working in real estate is a great alternative.

However, it’s still a job.

There’s a difference between making a living in real estate (which is simply another job) and investing in real estate. If you want to make real, life-changing money, you need to invest in real estate—you need to buy property and hold onto it.

When you wholesale or flip a property, you’re working for the asset (you have a job) instead of letting the asset work for you (you have an investment). If that’s your day job and it enables you to buy and hold properties, then great. But buying and holding needs to be part of your strategy from the beginning.

Benefits of Holding Onto Property

Over the years, I’ve wholesaled and flipped properties, and I’ve worked with clients who have been very successful in doing this. I can honestly tell you that I regret selling almost everything I’ve ever sold. The only sales I don’t regret are the ones I exchanged into other properties.

rental-property-financial-benefits

Many people I talk to say the same. They wish they would have held onto more of their properties.

Why?

Because of the trifecta of benefits you get from holding: income, equity, tax advantages.

Income

I’m not going to call it “passive income” because it’s not exactly passive—there is work to be done. Instead, I call it “ongoing” income. What’s especially great is the income goes up over time as rents increase. Like other investments, time (holding) is your friend.

I bought a duplex in Denver in 2011 and the rents I received at the time on each side were $1,100/mo. Today, my rents are $2,000/mo.

Expenses have gone up a bit, but the net income on that property has doubled. If you multiply that by the number of properties you own, that can grow to be a significant income.

Equity

Again, time (holding) is your friend. As years go by, the value of the property goes up and the debt is paid down. This is where wealth in real estate is generated.

I paid $190,000 for the duplex mentioned above in 2011. It’s now worth over $575,000 today.

I’ve used the equity in this property to buy other properties, and I’m getting ready to use some more equity to help get my kids through college. It’s the gift that keeps on giving. Again, the more property you hold onto, the more wealth is created over time.

Related: How I Went From 3 to 20 Properties Using the Power of Home Equity Loan

Tax Advantages

The income from properties you hold is offset by property-related expenses, loan interest expenses, property tax expenses, and a depreciation write-off. The amount of taxes paid on the money made is extremely low.

When you flip properties, you may pay short-term capital gains taxes on your profits. This is one of the highest tax rates you can pay when combined with your ordinary income tax.

Depending on your intent when you bought it, you have to hold your property for 12 months or more in order to avoid short-term capital gains or to do a tax-deferred 1031 exchange. Talk to your certified public accountant about how to minimize taxes if you plan to flip properties.

Related: 8 Ways to Vet a CPA for Your Real Estate Investing Business

Is Now the Right Time to Buy and Hold?

You may be wondering if now is the right time to buy.

thinking-purpose

I’ve bought and sold properties through good and bad times. I believe NOW is always the right time to buy, as long as the fundamentals of the purchase are sound. By that I mean:

  1. It cash flows.
  2. It is a good product in a decent location.
  3. You’re not over-leveraged.

Generally, if you’re worried about real estate cycles, don’t be.

There are cycles, yes. But over the long-run, values always go up.

I purchased a single-family rental in Phoenix in 2003. The value went up dramatically prior to 2008, and then it went down.

Because it was a nice property in a good location, it was always rented during the downturn, and it broke even on cash flow. I held it until the market came back up, and sold it again in 2014.

Had I held it longer, it would be worth much more today.

The Bottom Line

There are a lot of different ways to make money in real estate. Everyone’s path is different.

You don’t necessarily have to work in real estate to invest in real estate. Many people keep their day job and invest in real estate on the side.

Whatever you do for a living, if you want to make real, life-changing money in real estate, buy and hold as many properties as you can. And if you do sell, do a 1031 exchange into another property or properties to keep the assets working for you.

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Questions? Comments?

Join the discussion here.

Brad Uhlig is a real estate broker and property investor in the Denver Metro Area. He has been investing in real estate for over 20 years—currently specializing in buying and holding—and has been a...
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    Barry H. Investor from Scottsdale, AZ
    Replied about 2 months ago
    BRAD - Your article is timely in a market of uncertainty - but you have driven the point home. You state "...NOW is always the right time to buy as long as the fundamentals of the purchase are sound..." Your story at the end of the article is EXACTLY the same as my story - started in 2004 (not 2003), had 7 doors and they all TANKED to approximately 50% of the value of what they were when I bought them in 2008-2011 (also in PHX by the way!!). Like everyone else, I freaked out, then I asked myself if it really mattered that the "values" had dropped 50% when the cash flow was the same....Answer = No. Besides, I did not buy those doors to flip them. I was trying to quit my day job - and I did, at age 50, by then having moved from rentals to mostly lending. Because Buy/Hold/Rental ROI margins vanished in AZ, I moved the model over to Kansas City MO where I now "work" as a Turn Key Remodel Seller who puts tenants into a fully remodeled property (SFH) and then I sell to investors . To your point in this article "....NOW is always the right time to buy as long as the fundamentals of the purchase are sound..." The numbers remain sound for me, my Borrower/Buyers, my model and my market. Again, Brad, great summary of what should be obvious, but is sometimes lost in the panic of the day.
    Brad Uhlig Real Estate Agent from Denver, CO
    Replied about 2 months ago
    Thanks for the note Barry, Sounds like we've both been through a cycle or two. Nice job moving to a stable market like KC.
    Scott Trench President of BiggerPockets from Denver, CO
    Replied about 2 months ago
    Exactly. Brad - After all this is over I'd love to meet you for a coffee or beer sometime. This is exactly how I approach my investing, also in Denver. I am not a real estate business owner. I am a real estate investor. I do not wait to buy real estate. I buy real estate and wait. I buy and capitalize my real estate, reviewing my expected return on equity, cash flow, and capitalization such that I have strong projected returns, but will NEVER have to commit more capital to the existing portfolio. I invest for the long-term appreciation and cash flow I believe I am likely to realize here in Colorado.
    Brad Uhlig Real Estate Agent from Denver, CO
    Replied about 2 months ago
    Thanks Scott, I'd love to meet up when we all get let free. I like your long term approach and i'm sure it's working well for you.
    Pramod P. New to Real Estate from Parsippany
    Replied about 2 months ago
    Nice Article Brad.
    Brad Uhlig Real Estate Agent from Denver, CO
    Replied about 2 months ago
    Thanks Pramod
    Stephen Brown New to Real Estate from Perrysburg, Ohio
    Replied about 2 months ago
    Thank you for posting. I keep over-stressing on getting started and if I am wasting time... and some nights I can't sleep from it; however, this is a long term wealth building game. I just need to get started and everything will go from there!
    Brad Uhlig Real Estate Agent from Denver, CO
    Replied about 2 months ago
    Could be some good buy opportunities coming up Stephen. Go for it.
    Dave Rav from Summerville, SC
    Replied about 2 months ago
    Agreed with the investor vs RE worker mindset and approach. The argument for keeping rentals in your portfolio is a good one as well. But, I have different beliefs though on holding onto "every piece of RE" I ever bought. For instance, some deals were *specifically* entered into for a flip. They would not cashflow to a significant degree then, and even now if I held them, would not be "home runs" when compared to the deals I entered into PURPOSEFULLY for buy and hold. I do what deals make sense for the particular exit strategy. It sounds like appreciation was very good to you, which may have impacted your results. However, there are parts of America (midwest especially) where appreciation is a bit more reasonable (if not down right lagging). Not everyone has the luxe of 20% YOY appreciation. And, actually, nor are those appreciation increases sustainable or healthy for the market. I'm not going any further onto this tangent, so I'll end it here - eventually there is a ceiling effect on this kind of lop-sided appreciation.
    Brad Uhlig Real Estate Agent from Denver, CO
    Replied about 2 months ago
    Good points Dave. Every deal is different and I have flipped for the purpose of making money so I can buy something I want to hold. My regrets are when I just sold and didn't roll the money into a bigger and better investment. Appreciation is a big bonus. I buy based on a cash on a cash return analysis assuming nothing for appreciation. However, if it's in a place where people want to live and is a property people want to live in, then chances are the appreciation and rent growth will come. Even in midwest markets there are sub-markets that have experienced better rent growth and appreciation than others. Certain areas of Kansas City, for example, have done very well over the last few years and other areas (sometimes just across the street) have not.
    Ruth Lyons Realtor from Highland, MD
    Replied about 2 months ago
    Agreed and thanks for the article. Prior to the effect of the virus, it was a seller's market where I live in the Balt/DC area. That seems to be quickly flipping to a buyer's market. Have courage and move forward. It is always the right time to buy for the right deal. I'm closing on a buy and hold on Monday, and looking for more deals.
    Brooke Booth Rental Property Investor from OR
    Replied about 2 months ago
    Thank you for this reminder! We have two rentals that we have rehabbed and are now looking to get tenants in them. Some have said this is not a good time to get tenants, but, I’m thinking the same rule above applies. Time. Well, at least, I’m hoping that’s the case. 😂
    Brad Uhlig Real Estate Agent from Denver, CO
    Replied about 2 months ago
    Brooke, Every market is different but I just easily filled one of my vacant units with a very good tenant. People still need a place to stay and the good tenants can still pay.
    Michelle Fenn Real Estate Agent from Brecksville, Ohio
    Replied about 2 months ago
    Great points Brad, I too am I buy and hold investor, not by planning but by necessity. My husband died in 2009 and left me a life insurance policy that I could not put in the tanking stock market. This was the best misfortune of my life. Buying, renovating and renting in good areas allowed me to sell multiple properties in 1031 Swaps over the past year. I now own properties in even better neighborhoods. Advantages stable rents, appreciation and ability to sell quickly at a profit.
    Brad Uhlig Real Estate Agent from Denver, CO
    Replied about 2 months ago
    Nice job of doing the right thing with that money Michelle. Sounds like you have a knack for it!
    Collin Radake
    Replied about 2 months ago
    Brad, I love your story as well, but as a female buy hold realtor investor, the bills are overwhelming. Utilities have risen, and sometimes you can not control your spending when things happen that are out of your control. In an ever changing world, how do you manage your money, and keep from going under when you have so many homes to account for. I bought multi families and I used to think more return, but with utilities its hard to split them up. Insurance and holding fees are expensive when you have so much brick as I say. What is your advice to someone that feels buried in debt with these properties and its like its always one that is giving your problems. Maybe I don't manage them properly, but I pay for all repairs and I do not do work on them, I sell real estate to compensate for bad months. Also, it seems harder and harder to get good help, especially if you're a female.
    Brad Uhlig Real Estate Agent from Denver, CO
    Replied about 2 months ago
    Collin, What market are your properties located in? There are a few other questions I would have before I could really give you good advice but one thing I see fairly often with some of my investor clients is that they get stuck in a bad cycle with their properties. i.e. they don't or aren't able to keep up with maintenance so they don't get good tenants, they have high and costly tenant turnover, and the tenants are at below market rents, so they can't afford to maintain the property, so they don't get good tenants, etc. One of the fundamentals I spoke about in my article is not being over leveraged. When you owe too much you can't weather storms or take care of unexpected maintenance items. The trick is to keep the property nice so you get good tenants at full market rent that want to stay, then you can afford to keep the property nice so you can get good tenants, at full market rents, that want to stay, etc. That's the cycle you want to be on. As I mentioned this is not passive income, there is work to do. It's hard for everyone to find good help. You need to work hard to find good contractors to help you out and this is ongoing work because contractors come and go. To control expenses, skip the middle man. For example, find a good painter that does the work himself and doesn't hire a crew to do it. He will be much less than a company with painting crews. Same goes for plumbers, electricians, etc. Find a good handyman that is reasonable that can do basic plumbing and electrical and small jobs. He will charge much less than a plumber if all he's doing is fixing a leak or installing a new sink. My handyman also installs water heaters for much less than a plumber. Build a network of other owners and people in the business to share references to these types of people. We are always helping our clients by referring these types of service providers to them. You don't have to do the work but if you want to save money you have to manage the project yourself or hire a good property manager that will manage things for you. Also, hold tenants responsible for the damage they cause and charge them back. Find a way to fairly charge them back for utilities. Make sure they understand the expectations and hold them to it. It's important that you maximize your income so you can stay on the right cycle.
    Deanna Opgenort Rental Property Investor from San Diego, CA
    Replied about 2 months ago
    Hi Collin, Your gender only matters in RE if you LET it matter. The math is the math. Utility costs aren't based on the gender of the landlord, and increasing costs is why rent needs to go up periodically. As far as repairs, if you don't do the research on how much a project should cost you risk getting ripped off no matter which gender you are. One silver lining of this whole pandemic is that the labor market will be flooded with a lot of very good workers at reasonable rates. You will still need to do your due diligence in figuring out whose going to do a good job vs who's going to just flap their gums about how good they are, but if when you find good people you treat them professionally and pay them fairly you could end up with a solid, loyal crew long term.
    Sonja Sevcik
    Replied about 2 months ago
    Yep - My 1st investment was in 2006 for all the wrong reasons. We thought we would short-term lease a property in my home town and be able to enjoy it ourselves occasionally. Short-term doesn't work out too well during poor economic times. It tanked in 2007 but I put in a long-term tenant and held on. We paid the cash flow short-fall for several years out of pocket with our day jobs. The property accrued losses and we invested from 2010-2019. All of those properties followed the rules to buy and hold - beginning with cash flow day 1 and ending with low leverage. The losses offset income while we invested in better opportunities. This recipe appears to be working - knock on wood and fingers crossed. I would not buy anything for the next six months, unless you find someone desperate (think at least a 20% discount from the March market). Just like the stock market - real estate will correct but it takes a bit more time. Follow the market, save your money, and get ready.
    Timur Abdullin
    Replied about 2 months ago
    Sonja, where do you invest that you anticipate to get a 20% wedge deal? Also, any ideas on how long to wait until after the virus has struck us and after the stock market began to collapse to start seeing considerable discounts? I operate in the hot market that the eastern NJ state is due to its proximity to the metropolitan NY state. It is the unofficial suburb to Manhattan. Also, I was hoping for more 3-4 MFHs to enter the market with the panic that's permeating every fabric of the finance world. But, nothing so far. Houses are getting multiple offers and get bought, still, at above the asking price in every case. Finally, how far behind does MFH RE market lag after the stock market?
    Brad Uhlig Real Estate Agent from Denver, CO
    Replied about 2 months ago
    Timur, Too early to tell how this will shake out. I was just looking at the data in my local market but the only data we have is from March so nothing changed. After 911 in 2001 People pulled their money out of the market and put it in real estate. Real estate values rose from 2001 to 2008. So there's no guaranty that values will fall. I'm brokering 2 transactions right now where the buyer is getting what I call the Covid-19 discount because the tenants have lost their jobs and are temporarily unable to pay full rent. The buyer's used this to negotiate a better deal. 6 months from now if everyone is back to work that discount may disappear. There could be distressed sellers out there in a few months but it could also be very competitive for those deals.
    Brian Garlington Realtor from Oakland CA investing in Cleveland OH and the Oakland, CA East Bay Market
    Replied about 2 months ago
    Brad, Outstanding article! Here in the San Francisco - Oakland Bay Area I have been telling people for years to buy and hold. Even if they don't have the income to afford it here. Buy and hold somewhere else out of state because 75% of that gross rental income from that out of state property can help you better qualify incomewise to accelerate your ability to buy here in the Bay Area. I've even coached people to consider tenants with a Section 8 Voucher to be the people they place in their buy and holds because the money is guaranteed for the most part by the government and with proper screening your buy and hold tenants can be your perfect hedge against inflation and a recession.
    Brad Uhlig Real Estate Agent from Denver, CO
    Replied about 2 months ago
    I love it Brian! 90% of my tenants are Section 8 and I am experiencing very little impact by what's happening right now. I provide very nice places for them to live and they love me for it. I have extremely low turnover because they stay forever. i screen them just like any other tenant and take my time selecting a tenant when I have a vacancy. I've had a few problem children but most are very good tenants.
    Neil Aggarwal Lender from Richardson, TX
    Replied about 2 months ago
    In Dallas, it's hard to find cash flowing deals. I hope that changes soon.
    Brad Uhlig Real Estate Agent from Denver, CO
    Replied about 2 months ago
    Taxes in Texas are like paying HOA fees. They ruin the numbers. Buy elsewhere if you can.
    Randall Prosise Rental Property Investor from Scottsdale, AZ
    Replied about 2 months ago
    I like your term "ongoing income" as it relates to your investments (and mine). I would rather have ongoing income over passive anyway. I enjoy working with my investments and keeping track of every detail. Cheers!
    Brad Uhlig Real Estate Agent from Denver, CO
    Replied about 2 months ago
    Thanks Randall, Me too!
    Scott J Sawyer Investor from Fountain Inn, SC
    Replied about 2 months ago
    Agree - NOW is always the right time to buy, as long as the fundamentals of the purchase are sound. lOVE IT! ..... My go-to is .... "It's always a good time to buy real estate, just depends on your strategy and desired outcome,"
    Brad Uhlig Real Estate Agent from Denver, CO
    Replied about 2 months ago
    Thanks Scott
    Cynthia DeLuca
    Replied about 2 months ago
    I could have written this article because every word of it is how I have felt for years. Great article! I buy and hold and currently am so thankful that I’m these trying times of COVID-19, where I’ve lost all my income from my “real job”, I still have a tremendous amount of income from my rental portfolio. Buy and hold! Good luck in your journeys.
    Peter Vander Ploeg Financial Advisor from Denver
    Replied about 2 months ago
    Thanks for your article, Brad! That's some sage advice for the real estate investor. I have been to a few of your local events, but have not had a chance to meet you in person. I look forward to meeting you when we get a chance. Until then, keep writing!
    Brad Uhlig Real Estate Agent from Denver, CO
    Replied about 2 months ago
    Thanks Peter, I look forward to meeting you as well.
    Jenny Li Rental Property Investor from Raleigh, NC
    Replied about 2 months ago
    Thanks for the article. From my experience, some market tanked and it hasn’t come back up. I bought my home in CT in 2005 at high when the market was booming. Market tanked shortly after that. For all these times, 14 years or so, I still have a 15% loss in equity. So whether NOW is a good time to buy is a tough decision. I guess it depends on your strategy.
    Alfred Johnson from Rocky Mount, NC
    Replied about 2 months ago
    great read Dave I really appreciate your insights and the timeliness of your article I'm just getting warmed up in the industry still working at daytime job but after that real estate thing I'm after it!
    Boris Harhaji Investor from Washington, DC
    Replied about 2 months ago
    I've just bought my 2nd and 3rd property (talking about a "bad timing") However, one just obtained a solid tenant and 3rd still in process. That being said, my goal is 10 houses in 2 years, and I just could not wait forever to buy at the bottom (not cause I can'twaot, but I can'tpredict it). My strategy was start getting feet wet and yes, save some when the market turns so you can reap the benefits. So now I have my "OK" timing on first from few years ago, "potentially bad" on the 2/3, and 7 or so more to get over the next few years, perhaps with even better results. Can't wait to time everything perfectly. As long as the cashflow is sound and overleveraged is not the issue (you have plan B and plan C), I think this market can work too. I did the same with my stock portfolio, 12/2019, moved 1/2 into money market, and now dollar cost leveraging it slowly as the specific price points are reached.
    Brad Uhlig Real Estate Agent from Denver, CO
    Replied about 2 months ago
    Keep going Boris, hopefully some good buy opportunities coming up.
    Katy Skjerping
    Replied about 2 months ago
    Hi Brad, I'm a newb. Your article spoke to me because I too grew up with parents who had properties, so we spent weekends going to the janitor supply store to clean out the office bathrooms etc. I too work/ed in an entirely different industry but now that I have a young child at home the real estate pivot made more sense. Although it took us some time to save the funds and find just the right property, we've only been actual landlords for a few months and of course this time of chaos has us bracing. Then I read this and asked myself: • Does it cash flow? Check. • Is it a good product in a decent location? Check.•You’re not over-leveraged? Check! Thank you for the simple triangle of good sense, in fact it can be my mantra moving forward. Hope this community is safe at home with tenants who are safe at home too. Sending thoughts and prayers to those who may be suffering great losses right now.
    Brad Uhlig Real Estate Agent from Denver, CO
    Replied about 2 months ago
    Katy, Thanks for this really nice reply. Best wishes on this investment and I echo your thought for those in this community to stay safe.
    Anne Nguyen Investor
    Replied about 2 months ago
    Thank you Brad for the article. That’s my strategy too. I’m in the analysis process of SFH vs small multi family vs townHomes. I’m curious what metrics you guys have for cash on cash return or cash flow to consider it a good deal? Thank you
    Brad Uhlig Real Estate Agent from Denver, CO
    Replied about 2 months ago
    Hi Anne, Depends on your market. I would shy away from a townhome because HOA fees typically ruin the cash on cash return. Single family homes are great when they're full and suck when they're empty unless you own a bunch of them and the money from others will offset the loss in income from a vacancy. I like duplexes because they live like a single family home (have a yard, etc) and the income from one unit can help pay the bills if the other unit goes vacant. These appeal to a family so the tenants stay longer. In Denver we are looking for a 6% or better cap rate on current numbers and 8% or better cash on cash return on proforma numbers after rehab. That usually results in a 12% or better total return when you factor in debt reduction. In other markets you can achieve a higher return but you might not get the same rent growth and appreciation.
    Jay Mat
    Replied about 2 months ago
    I like your story Brad. Thanks
    Brad Uhlig Real Estate Agent from Denver, CO
    Replied about 2 months ago
    Thanks Jay
    Ryan Basye Investor from Omaha, NE
    Replied about 2 months ago
    Great article. Glad to know there are some who share my perspective. Too many people jumped on the BRRR method or FLIP/Wholesale. I started in Denver as well in 2003 and ended up moving back to Omaha in 2005 - selling everything before the drop (karma for moving close to mom). Since investing in Omaha, I have dozens of rentals with equity levels that will sustain any market. Along with CASH FLOW, true long term investors know the benefits of depreciation, write-offs, and low taxes on the actual income. There is always some work on your investments, but KNOW you are working for your bottom line! THANKS
    Al Richey Rental Property Investor from Oak Point, TX
    Replied about 2 months ago
    Great article, and I am 100% with you that I also wish I had held onto most of my earlier flips. Started out 4 years ago flipping here in North Texas, have learned a lot along the way with some lessons harder than others (but blessed that we never lost money on a deal). The doors I have held (one duplex and four single family) have all appreciated in value and have had little to no vacancy. Focus now is buy and hold with a preference for duplexes and quads, and an occasional flip if that is the best course for a specific deal. We are in uncharted territory with the impact of the virus and related economic impact, but it appears to be a buying opportunity as long as we are very-very diligent with the analysis and numbers, now more than ever.
    Brad Uhlig Real Estate Agent from Denver, CO
    Replied about 2 months ago
    Thanks Al, good perspective and i like the product you're focused on.
    Carlos Varum Jr from Providence, RI
    Replied about 2 months ago
    Hallelujah! Great Common Sense Article - You covered everything except I felt you didn't go into the BEST benefit in depth (Equity). You never have to sell, because you can always cashout refi or put a Line of Credit on the 70%-80% of the equity left in the property as it appreciates over the years! 3 years ago I gut renovated a 4 family and turned it into 4 luxury apartments with 2 Penthouses. It appraised for $950,000 back then. The Interest rates have dropped like crazy, so I just called my bank to refinance it. Since my rents went up rapidly, but my expenses only went up minimally and there are no comps (no one else in the area has built or sold a luxury 4 unit with 2 decked out penthouses in this area) the appraisers have to use CAP rate to figure out appraised value... and it came back at $1,400,000!!! I told the bank, GREAT... Let's refinance the existing balance of the mortgage ($655,000) at the lower rate (saves me $1000/month in cashflow) and give me a Line of Credit for the balance of the 70% of equity ($325,000). I now am saving (making) an extra $1000/month in cashflow AND have another $325,000 to pounce on the market with if it drops, find a deal of a lifetime or use if I am in a bind.. but I don't have to pay interest on it unless I use it. Thank you Rich Dad Poor Dad... keep assets, get rid of liabilities. Never sell a positive cashflowing property... its a Win (income), Win (tax advantages, and the biggest WIN (Equity)!
    Brad Uhlig Real Estate Agent from Denver, CO
    Replied about 2 months ago
    Nice Carlos! Good story
    Wes Salous Investor from Oklahoma city
    Replied about 2 months ago
    Good info Brad.. Thank you. Will be in touch for advises
    Brad Uhlig Real Estate Agent from Denver, CO
    Replied about 2 months ago
    Thanks Wes
    Cornelius Camp Real Estate Agent from Chicago, IL
    Replied about 2 months ago
    Great article!! I was thinking I should go the exact route and your article just confirmed it. I wish I was in Denver so we could meet up for coffee. Take care and again, great article.
    Brad Uhlig Real Estate Agent from Denver, CO
    Replied about 2 months ago
    Thanks Cornelius
    Adam Wallen Rental Property Investor from Grand Rapids, MI
    Replied about 2 months ago
    Great article, Brad. I completely agree that the "real" money in real estate is in buy & hold investing, as this allows you to capitalize on all of the wealth generation potential for the investment. However, I also think wholesaling or flipping can be a great way for new investors to accumulate capital to reinvest in long term buy & holds.
    Brad Uhlig Real Estate Agent from Denver, CO
    Replied about 2 months ago
    Agreed Adam. Hope you're doing well in MI