Latest Project Before and Afters

13 Replies

Well, it's about a rap with my latest two year "live in" flip. Did 100% of the work myself. She will be going on the market in a couple weeks. Here's the before and afters!

Purchase Price: $102,000
Repairs: $20,000
Asking Price: $169,000
















The kitchen had to to be added onto about two feet into the garage otherwise you couldn't get by the fridge to go out to the garage...

















































Wow @Brady Lucero this is incredible! Thanks for putting this together for us. You've done a terrific job! How long did it take? What's the market like in your area (how long to you expect it to be on the market?)

Great job!

That look great Brady! Thank you for sharing with us on BP!

Tina

Originally posted by Brandon Turner:
Wow Brady Lucero this is incredible! Thanks for putting this together for us. You've done a terrific job! How long did it take? What's the market like in your area (how long to you expect it to be on the market?)

Great job!

Thanks Brandon!
Our market is stable and my wife/Realtor expects 60-90 days.
I had to juggle a full-time job but about 90% of the project took 2-1/2 months of 3-4 hour week days and 8+ hour weekends. The last 10% I've been working on the last two years.

This week I'm building a stained concrete patio with a black stained pergola out back...last project

Can't wait to do it all over again soon!
I must be crazy...

Thanks David and Tina!

I'll have extensive before and afters of every project.
Fun to do.

Looks great! I assume the $20K repair number is not factoring in you/wifes time. How many hours total do you estimate you spent on this rehab repair wise?

@Brady Lucero this looks great, mind walking me through what you did for the concrete floors? that finish looks amazing. Whats in the bugsprayer?

I might not be brave enough to try that for a flip, but I would love to do that for my personal residence.

Since it is your primary residence you wont pay any taxes. This is a great way to go.

Originally posted by Keith J.:
Looks great! I assume the $20K repair number is not factoring in you/wifes time. How many hours total do you estimate you spent on this rehab repair wise?

Thanks Keith,
I never count my personal time put into my projects as repair costs. I figure this time is worth its weight in gold and also to be my most important key to success.

My best estimate is around 340 total hours for repairs.

Brady,

Not sure what your long term goals are.

I agree that your time is worth it's weight in gold. My personal opinion is that you are spending too much of your own time rehabbing your properties yourself. You are really good at what you do.

If you just did this work full time as a contractor on other people's properties I think you could make way more then the $40 profit in 2 years (+ free living while you do it).

Or continue to do flips but oversee the work on yours and several properties at once and leverage that skill into more profit.

Just food for thought as to how you can take that passion and skill that you have and make it work for you even more.

Originally posted by John Espinosa:
Brady Lucero this looks great, mind walking me through what you did for the concrete floors? that finish looks amazing. Whats in the bugsprayer?

I might not be brave enough to try that for a flip, but I would love to do that for my personal residence.

It's a great looking floor but high maintenance. It needs to be re-top coated every two years if traffic is high.

I'll give ya a quick rundown of the steps:

Step 1:
You'll need to purchase your concrete overlay product. ( many out there ) My brand was bella vernichi. I also had to purchase fiberglass tape, serico and HardiBacker since I was installing over plywood subfloor. Also had to purchase reinforcer for mixing, primer for bonding the concrete to the backer, the color stain I wanted, a sprayer and a suitable top coat.

Step 2: (Only for wood subfloor)
Install HardiBacker, tape seems with fiberglass tape, serico all seams. 3 coats and sand.

Step 3:
Paint a coat of primer over everything and when tacky to the touch:
Mix concrete with reinforcer and trowel on roughly an 1/8" thick everywhere. I was very inconstant with my trowel pattern to give a rock look.

Step 4:
After drying overnight
-Hydrate-use sprayer and soak everything with water then
Immediately after
-Stain-use sprayer
Repeat if darker tone is desired

Step 5:
After drying overnight
Apply top coat with a paint roller
15 minuets in between coats
3 coats
Let dry over night (BAD FUMES so don't stay in house long)

The whole project wasn't that bad...even a little fun. The only part that sucked was having to put 60 big screwes or so in every single piece of hardibacker.

Your Done! Until 2 years....
These floors are also very easy to repair if damaged.

If you decide to try it I can help you with any questions you might have.

Originally posted by Keith J.:
Brady,

Not sure what your long term goals are.

I agree that your time is worth it's weight in gold. My personal opinion is that you are spending too much of your own time rehabbing your properties yourself. You are really good at what you do.

If you just did this work full time as a contractor on other people's properties I think you could make way more then the $40 profit in 2 years (+ free living while you do it).

Or continue to do flips but oversee the work on yours and several properties at once and leverage that skill into more profit.

Just food for thought as to how you can take that passion and skill that you have and make it work for you even more.

Very interesting...
Never thought of overseeing others projects for extra income.
That's a great idea.
I have a decent resume to pitch.
Would need to find the proper people to pitch it to and figure out how to pitch it...

As of now my plan of attack is to build up a sufficient savings to quit my current job as a Carpenter and support multiple flips/year. I'll be able to afford doing two projects at a time from here on out so my final day working for the man is coming.....

I like to imagine my potential when I can utilize the 2000 hours/year I give to the man (for JACK) and invest them into my personal business.

I will consider your advise and possibly make amendments to my business plan.

Thanks Keith

Cool. I like to use sweat equity, too. One thing I noticed that I would change is the window trim. The vertical pieces should extend all the way the bottom and the bottom piece sitting between the two vertical pieces. This allows an egress for the water to drain out of that could seep into the cornice work after the caulking starts to crack. to drain out (in theory).

Free eBook from BiggerPockets!

Ultimate Beginner's Guide Book Cover

Join BiggerPockets and get The Ultimate Beginner's Guide to Real Estate Investing for FREE - read by more than 100,000 people - AND get exclusive real estate investing tips, tricks and techniques delivered straight to your inbox twice weekly!

  • Actionable advice for getting started,
  • Discover the 10 Most Lucrative Real Estate Niches,
  • Learn how to get started with or without money,
  • Explore Real-Life Strategies for Building Wealth,
  • And a LOT more.

We hate spam just as much as you

Create Lasting Wealth Through Real Estate

Join the millions of people achieving financial freedom through the power of real estate investing

Start here