Home built in 1900!?

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I'm looking at purchasing a house that was built in 1900, remodeled in 2008. Not being especially savvy about the internal workings of a home and how to fix them, I'm looking for insights as to whether it's overall a good idea to venture into these waters? Is it inevitable a home that is almost 120 years old will have more issues than a newer home, or does it depend on maintenance over the years? What about plumbing?

Any insights are appreciated and welcome! Thanks-

Originally posted by @Henley H. :

I'm looking at purchasing a house that was built in 1900, remodeled in 2008. Not being especially savvy about the internal workings of a home and how to fix them, I'm looking for insights as to whether it's overall a good idea to venture into these waters? Is it inevitable a home that is almost 120 years old will have more issues than a newer home, or does it depend on maintenance over the years? What about plumbing?

Any insights are appreciated and welcome! Thanks-

 I've done several homes that were built between 1900 & 1920. Depending on what the "remodel" was in 2008, and if it was done by permit and inspected, you could find almost anything. Basically take a marble and roll it at various angles across the floors. if the floors are level and you don't see any obvious problems, that is a good start. Fixing an un-level house is difficult. Look at the windows and see if they are single pane or double pane. It can really affect the heating & cooling if it is still single pane. Look at the valves under the sinks and in the bathroom. If they are original, then the plumbing probably is too. If the plumbing is old it is probably galvanized and over time will clog. If there is good water pressure it probably isn't a problem. Fixing plumbing is expensive. Look in the attic for insulation and if there isn't any, put some in. While you are up there, look and see if the wiring is knob & tube, aluminum or romex. If it is knob and tube, then it isn't grounded and with today's electronics, you really need a ground. To be compliant in bathrooms and kitchens you need GFI circuits and those have to be grounded. Look at the heating unit. Generally they have a life of about 15 years and it should have been replaced long ago. If the old "octopus" heater is still there or a coal burner, it makes for interesting conversation when someone comes over but is very inefficient. Shine a light into the chimney and see what the condition of the mortar is. Look at the roof and siding and see if they are showing wear & tear. If there are cracked or missing shingles those need to be dealt with. If it is on septic, have it pumped and inspected. If it is on city sewer have a plumber run a camera down the line and tell you if there are any roots or broken pipes. I like the character of old houses and they can be successfully modernized yet keep their original appearance. Just be prepared for surprises. Depending on the sales price, it might be worth having a property inspector go through and make a report you can work off of.

@Account Closed Gave you great advice. Lots of good things to check. I do disagree with the marble test as pretty much every 100 year old home has shifted and common and shouldn’t affect value or rent much. Unless fail brick walls or other major things obviously. (But each to their own) For the most part everything is “easy” to fix except the electrical. Primarily look for knob and tube. Ask your inspector specifically to pull light switch and outlet covers and check for it. It’s very common for homes that age to have it. It’s super expensive to fix in two story homes. So lots of times you just have to live with it.

Not saying don’t do it as most of my personal rental are that old. Just know what you are getting into.

Good luck.