Sold half of a lot, what do I do with the fence?

7 Replies

Bought a house and divided the lot in two. I am renovating and selling the house and selling off the divided lot separately to a builder. The property has a chain link fence spanning the whole frontage of the property and the lot is in contract. I know that the builder will want to put in a nicer fence but I don't have any room in my budget for a new fence on the side of property with the house on it. Now I have a new house with an old chain link fence which I don't think will look great once the project is finished and can cause problems when it comes to selling the property subject to half of the property being sold off. 

My Question is. 

A) Do I just take down the fence entirely? It is not a bad neighborhood but there is something that feels like you should have a fence to protect there. 

B) Do I paint half the fence black - This would mean that I have 2/5ths of the fence left.

C) Try and negotiate a new fence in the contract of the sale and with the builder as he will probably be building a new fence. 

Any help is greatly appreciated. 

You could leave the fence or try to negotiate with the builder to split the cost with you, I wouldn't take the fence down if it is in the backyard unless this is common in your area.

Have the fence removed on the front of the lot you're selling and have it reinstalled on the property line between your house and the lot. Then you have the same fence, contiguous, on your house all the way around. If you need it to look nicer, you could grow a vine on it, insert vinyl slats that make it solid-looking, or paint it. Chain link fence can easily be relocated; I've had it done on several properties. 

@JD Martin I am just now getting to this part of my build. Would you mind elaborating a little on how to relocate a chain link fence? I am fairly certain that the metal poles are all set in cement under the dirt, I pulled one of out and it was braced in with cement so I am guessing that the rest are as well. It could be a decent size project for a fence that will most likely be torn down once the split off lots starts being developed.

I am mostly concerned about a visually respectable way to show the division in the two lots. Do you think construction fencing will scare away buyers at all?

Thanks,

@Steven Denio Construction fencing may scare off buyers (nobody wants to live next to a construction site) even if you can't reuse the poles it just takes a few cuts with wire cutters to take down the main fence part at which point it can be rolled up and used elsewhere.

Originally posted by @Steven Denio :

JD Martin I am just now getting to this part of my build. Would you mind elaborating a little on how to relocate a chain link fence? I am fairly certain that the metal poles are all set in cement under the dirt, I pulled one of out and it was braced in with cement so I am guessing that the rest are as well. It could be a decent size project for a fence that will most likely be torn down once the split off lots starts being developed.

I am mostly concerned about a visually respectable way to show the division in the two lots. Do you think construction fencing will scare away buyers at all?

Thanks,

 Sure - it's pretty easy. Cut the ties that hold the chain link to the poles & framework and roll up the section that you want to move. Loosen the lock screws or clamps that hold the top (and bottom, if you have them) rails to the posts and take those down (you'll reuse those). Dig slightly around the poles so you are just slightly below grade and cut the poles off at that point with a reciprocating saw and recycle the metal. Now you sink new poles along the new line, reattach the rails that you saved, and reattach the rolled up chain link fencing to the skeleton. 

It's not all that expensive having someone else do it. I had about 100 feet of fence taken down and  about 40 feet reinstalled in a different location on the lot (tying in to the fence at the back of the property) for a few hundred bucks last year. Only material cost was link ties and new poles and a couple of bags of concrete, and labor was around $200-300. It took them about 3 or 4 hours. 

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