People are fleeing California, are you?

311 Replies

  • Do you live in California? Yes
  • Have you lived in California in the past 5 years? Yes, 48 years total
  • If so, where? Lancaster, Costa Mesa, Santa Maria (3x's), Fontana, Lompoc
  • Will you be staying or leaving? Staying
  • Why? Family, Job, beautiful place to live
  • What is your full-time income producing job? Pastor

Here is what I gleaned and I have been reading this forum since it got started and keeping updates:

a) Everyone agree CA has lots going for it like tech industry, nice weather and great RE appreciation

b) The ones who are optimistic think things can only get better or keep growing at same rate due to the fact that the people who are moving here are smart and highly qualified (at expense of the "weak" who are the ones leaving or not coping)

c) The pessimistic ones think it is almost impossible to live here and that they are hanging on because they have a job or were lucky to have bought 10+ years ago. They still enjoy the weather but they find that it may be getting dicier

d) Most people agree the regulation and taxes are nuts but the optimistic ones call it the price to pay for paradise

e) Most people dislike the overcrowding and traffic but again glass half full says it is the price to ay since everyone wants to be here

f) Also, not all of CA is like SF or LA, so there may be other areas that tradeoff a longer /hellish commute for some degree of affordability

g) The one thing I heard which is new is so-called rise in crime due to bums and lax police enforcement and a more general liberal mind-set. If so, is SF becoming like NY in the 80s. Except that there is no Rudy Giuliani as Mayor on the horizon

In conclusion, it seems the Ayes have it by a slim margin due to a booming economy - CA is a great place to be and hoping it will keep going up.

For me it will be interesting to see how long the tech boom lasts. for example, lots of money being invested in self-driving start ups but not everybody is clamoring for self-driving cars. Obviously it seems it would be very useful in CA traffic. But then maybe it will be like Y2k again. The bubble will burst but the next Amazon and Google will be born from the ashes ....

  • Do you live in California?
    • Not currently
  • Have you lived in California in the past 5 years?
    • Yes, between 2003-2014
  • If so, where?
    • Los Angeles - Westside (Santa Monica, Culver City, Mar Vista)
  • Will you be staying or leaving?
    • I left in Dec 2014
  • Why?
    • I was crushing it in real estate and I loved living there. Ultimately though, after having our first child, my wife and I felt LA was not the best place to raise kids (we planned on having more..and did) - quite dangerous, dirty, etc. There were 3 murders within 6 blocks of my house in the last 1.5 years I lived there, and I was in a nice area (Mar Vista). Traffic is beyond atrocious too. So, we moved back to my hometown of Indianapolis to give them a proper midwest upbringing.
  • What is your full time income producing job? 
    • Real estate broker

I can't tell you how many folks from California are moving (permanently) to Nashville. 

The last couple of houses I have sold have all been to folks moving from California.

I've spoken to a number of BP'ers from Cal saying they are also planning their move down to Nashville. 

The number one reason they had (besides that Nashville is the best city in America) was that they want to be able to keep some of the money they earn. TN has no state tax, cost of living is dirt cheap compared to Cal.

So...I was born and raised In California. I was born at Stanford Hospital, I went to school in Southern California and came back to the Bay Area post grad. I definitely lived in my parents home when I went back. I had a degree in Urban and Regional Planning with a Minor in GIS (Geographic Information Systems). I kept getting recruited by recruiters working for Apple and Google. The problem was I was more focused on the Urban Planning aspect of GIS. I did not have the coding. Although I loved GIS I did not intend on that being my main focus. I had always had a love for real estate from a very young age. I love architecture and the economic factors involved in it. I naturally got my real estate license when an opportunity came to move out of state and help an investor acquire properties out of state. With my background in Urban Planning I was thrilled to do the research to find the perfect place to invest in. This journey took me to Dallas, Texas. I got my real estate license in Texas and have continued to maintain my California license active. My primary place of residence is now Houston, Texas. I still go back and visit but the standard of living in the Bay Area versus Texas is astronomical. I can do so much more here in Texas than I can in California. I can go back and visit but everything has changed there. Those that are able to keep up with the standard of living there should definitely stay there and enjoy California. However, if you are young and struggling there are better places to grow as a young adult and find success and that's just a hard truth. I am not saying give up but weigh your options do your research and put yourself in a place where you will succeed. Some are doing just fine but have no money invested in real estate and now way to enter the California market. Don't give up on the dream of investing in real estate. You can invest in out of state properties in areas such as Texas. If you need help I am starting a networking group out of the Bay Area for anyone looking to invest in real estate in Texas. I strongly believe that if you invest in out of state properties they can help fund your lifestyle in California and maybe you won't have to leave California. I came to Texas and loved it. 

@Luka Milicevic my daughter and her family want to move to Tennessee in a few years when their youngest is out of high school.  I think they're looking at the Knoxville area. I've only been to Nashville once, but it was so beautiful around there, all the farms and ranches. 

In reading these posts, it seems Texas is a huge draw for a lot of those leaving CA, but I know I've met many Californians here in Oregon too. 

As much as I hate to see the downward spiral in many segments of the population, if I found a project in Orange County that I could afford to do, I'd do it in a heartbeat. O.C. is the crown jewel of so cal in my book, and I love those cities, and they're very low crime. I'n hoping against hope that there will be changes made in CA leadership to bring some more middle of the road policies back, and get out of the race to always be the most regulatory stringent state, as they're just adding more costs to housing. 

I went to Orange County for a wedding - first time in SoCal ever. I have to say that prior to that, from everything I'd heard, I was a believer that California was a poorly run state with terrible people, ridiculously overpriced, but that the weather was pretty good.

Boy was I wrong. 

California is one of the most wonderful places on the planet. It really DOES have PERFECT weather. Near the coast in Orange County the weather is perfect - cool nights, warm days -- there's even a constant pleasant breeze coming in from the ocean, a breeze that blows nearly all insects and pests inland, leaving the coastal area nearly free of airborne bugs. I had an uber driver there who said he hadn't turned on either his AC or his heat in 16 years (!?) (perhaps they didn't work :) ). 

For all the talk about the terrible people in California, everyone I met was wonderful, pleasant, and nice. Certainly the strangers that I bumped into seemed friendly and reasonable, as much so as anywhere I've ever been.

And the food. Wow! I ordered a pizza. It was $18 for a large. That's much more expensive than a good pizza in Denver. But it was up there with some of the best pizza I've ever had. I paid $8 for a bagel with steak and cheese one morning. One of the best bagels I've ever had. I suspect that with the high prices of everything, there is simply little room in Orange County, LA, and San Diego for lousy experiences in the marketplace.

I could go on and on. There is a reason people move to and stay in CA if they can afford it. And affording it seems to be a matter of making a smart housing decision and being reasonable with your overall spending.

I wonder if there is a political bent to some arguments from folks who say how lousy CA is and how it is going to implode -- particularly if they've never visited or been there with an open mind (or at all!). I saw a well-run town that was clean, with healthy people and a place where I wouldn't mind spending a few years of my life at some point.

Of course, I don't think that I will be investing in real estate there from out of state. I'll build my portfolio and wealth elsewhere and give myself the option to afford a lifestyle there if I wish at some point. 

I don't really understand the haters. Particularly those who don't even live there. Maybe try visiting and keep an open mind? 

I mentioned that shoplifting was spreading like wildfire here in San Francisco and how I get bumped by fleeing shoplifters.  Now, the result is death.

An 85-year-old man died over the weekend after a shoplifting suspect ran into him while fleeing with stolen goods from a store in San Francisco, authorities said Monday.

https://www.sfgate.com/crime/article/Fleeing-SF-shoplifter-accused-of-murder-after-12985386.php

@Scott Trench I love hearing posts like yours about SoCal. I've lived here my whole life and I've loved every second. There's always been this stereotype of people being stuck up (especially in Santa Monica, where I live). I've never experienced this. In fact, I was having an interesting conversation with another BP member at a meet up recently and he was saying he thinks that the people who give this reputation are often people who moved here from another state. From my experience, I think he may be right!

I'm glad to hear you had a good time while you were here, let me know next time you're in the area!

Does it count if I left in 97? I moved out there after college and worked two jobs and couldn’t afford living in Sacramento. I loved California but couldn’t find a decent paying job with a Liberal Arts degree. I went back to Minnesota and found employment and went back to school to get my computer science degree which has paid off quite well.

  • Do you live in California?
    • Yes and have my whole life. It's a gorgeous state, and it's full of opportunity, but admittedly it is pricey. The fact that some people are buying 900 sq ft 2/1 in Sacramento of all places is a sign of the times.
  • Have you lived in California in the past 5 years?
  • If so, where?
    • I've lived in San Francisco for the past 7 years and Roseville (north of Sacramento) for the 12 years prior to that.
  • Will you be staying or leaving?
    • Leaving San Francisco, staying in CA. With a new addition to the family en route, spending $2,500 a month on a 1-bedroom apartment isn't sustainable. 
  • What is your full time income producing job? 
    • Direct Lender/Mortgage Broker for real estate investors. 

I miss my homeland something fierce!  I was born and raised in Santa Barbara County, but have been in the midwest for the past 7 years. Being out here has afforded me the opportunity to buy a home, raise a family, and still have money left over for travel, investing, etc. I always felt like I'd be working solely to pay a mortgage in California and that was a scary thought to me.

Admittedly, part of the long term goal of real estate investing is to be able to create enough passive income to consider buying back home. 

For now, I enjoy the frequent visits to the family and buy scented beach candles that don't come close to comparing to the real thing.

Originally posted by @Scott Trench :

I went to Orange County for a wedding - first time in SoCal ever. I have to say that prior to that, from everything I'd heard, I was a believer that California was a poorly run state with terrible people, ridiculously overpriced, but that the weather was pretty good.

Boy was I wrong. 

California is one of the most wonderful places on the planet. It really DOES have PERFECT weather. Near the coast in Orange County the weather is perfect - cool nights, warm days -- there's even a constant pleasant breeze coming in from the ocean, a breeze that blows nearly all insects and pests inland, leaving the coastal area nearly free of airborne bugs. I had an uber driver there who said he hadn't turned on either his AC or his heat in 16 years (!?) (perhaps they didn't work :) ). 

For all the talk about the terrible people in California, everyone I met was wonderful, pleasant, and nice. Certainly the strangers that I bumped into seemed friendly and reasonable, as much so as anywhere I've ever been.

And the food. Wow! I ordered a pizza. It was $18 for a large. That's much more expensive than a good pizza in Denver. But it was up there with some of the best pizza I've ever had. I paid $8 for a bagel with steak and cheese one morning. One of the best bagels I've ever had. I suspect that with the high prices of everything, there is simply little room in Orange County, LA, and San Diego for lousy experiences in the marketplace.

I could go on and on. There is a reason people move to and stay in CA if they can afford it. And affording it seems to be a matter of making a smart housing decision and being reasonable with your overall spending.

I wonder if there is a political bent to some arguments from folks who say how lousy CA is and how it is going to implode -- particularly if they've never visited or been there with an open mind (or at all!). I saw a well-run town that was clean, with healthy people and a place where I wouldn't mind spending a few years of my life at some point.

Of course, I don't think that I will be investing in real estate there from out of state. I'll build my portfolio and wealth elsewhere and give myself the option to afford a lifestyle there if I wish at some point. 

I don't really understand the haters. Particularly those who don't even live there. Maybe try visiting and keep an open mind? 

 Hi Scott,

Thank you for the wonderful words. I'm so pleased to hear of your positive experience here in CA.  On a related note, we took at weekend trip to Denver a few years back because we enjoy visiting other cities whenever we get a chance. The folks there were extremely  courteous and were always so happy to hear that we were from out of town just visiting and enjoying the beautiful scenery here. You can feel the warmth of the people in Denver not only in the face to face interactions but also when driving. 

I have lived in California for the majority of my life. My wife and I plan on leaving in the next 3-5 yrs. We both have jobs that are diverse. She is an RN and I am a Lineman. We expect in the next few years we can make the leap. We are leaving not because we don’t like California, but we are leaving to see and experience this great nation. It’s the millennial in me.

  • Do you live in California? Yes, all my life. 
  • Have you lived in California in the past 5 years? Yes. 
  • If so, where? Raised in Sacramento, lived in OC- Irvine for last 14 years
  • Will you be staying or leaving? Staying!!
  • Why? The weather is amazing. The area is nice and safe. The schools are great. 
  • What is your full time income producing job? Real Estate Agent and Investor

I think people live where they live and they don't live there (or leave that place) purely for financial reasons. For example I used to travel to a Midwest city for work few years back and was amazed and how people lived there in tight communities and across generations and they just could not be lured to move anywhere else. That Midwest city had very little to offer in terms of job growth or scenic beauty, or nightlife or restaurants or outdoor activities but hey the locals loved it. Weather was darn harsh, hot summers and sub zero cold winters.

In fact, after becoming friends with the locals, they as ked me why I was not thinking of moving from San Francisco to that city. When I asked them why they would not move to SF, they said, they could not bear the "cold summers" and how it was hard to pin down on proper seasons. That they said was absolutely non negotiable for them.

In the end it was clear they wont move, their roots were so deep and they had the most important factors to live where they lived which was family.

 I would say the same for CA or any other place. If you have your life set in a place, have family around, friends that you like, every place becomes special. For many of us, the natural beauty, the job opportunities, the weather, the diversity, the liberal mindset of people etc. are an icing on the cake and trust me that icing is awesome even if it costs an extra dime or two.

I do feel for people at the lower end of the economic ladder but i cant speak for everyone. Its for sure not easy. But there are other examples. For instance, I know the lady who used to clear our home 3 years back used to live in a garage with 3 kids. Today she employs 8 people, cleans large homes in affluent areas like Saratoga, Cupertino, Los Altos and also gets subcontracted work at tech companies. The lady has long since moved out of the garage and into a 2 bedroom place which she rents. Just an example of how life is like for some of those starting at the very bottom of the ladder. I bet she feels glad she did not rent the uhual to escape.

  • Do you live in California? Yes 
  • Have you lived in California in the past 5 years? Born and raised in San Diego, CA
  • If so, where? San Diego
  • Will you be staying or leaving? Not even a question California is the place to be. Staying.
  • Why? Great weather, culturally diverse, strong economy, lots of opportunity. 
  • What is your full time income producing job? Digital Marketing.

This post has been removed.

  • Do you live in California? Yes
  • Have you lived in California in the past 5 years? Yes
  • If so, where?  Just outside San Francisco
  • Will you be staying or leaving? Staying in California but relocating to San Diego
  • Why? Better commutes, better school district, cheaper all around
  • What is your full time income producing job? Business Owner, RE investor

I just moved from California about 2 years ago.
Used to live in Berkeley, then Alameda.
I don’t plan on moving back anytime soon.
I moved to Michigan, get paid 50% more and can actually have a quality of life I enjoy. Yes, the weather is something I miss everyday, but to pay what I think is fair for housing and living expenses more than makes up for it.
I am the president and chef of a bakery start-up.

@Karla Talancon I am so glad I stumbled upon your response. I wasn't born in the SF Bay Area, but I have been here for almost 18 years. I studied finance, statistics, psychology, and computer science and I have had a great run in the tech industry. I love houses since I was very young, and I am also into demography and economics. I remember building houses with LEGO was the only toy I played growing up. I worked at Google, Yahoo, and a whole bunch of startups in the valley as well as my own tech non-profit in Chile. I have recently left my last project and am looking to invest out of state. I am fortunate that I bought my condo in Berkeley area 9 years ago that allows me to live cheaper and saved up. But the high cost of living here won't allow me to live comfortably without another tech job. I have been thinking about moving but my support network is here. Anyways, it is true that many of us (Californians) are inclined to move elsewhere. I have visited Austin and Dallas in the past and liked them both. "I strongly believe that if you invest in out of state properties they can help fund your lifestyle in California and maybe you won't have to leave California." This is exactly what I am trying to accomplish. I bought a foreclosed condo in Chicago for dirt cheap and now its value has increased lots. Me and other owners in the building decided to sell as and we are already in contract. So, it's time for me to look for better and bigger opportunities.

  • Do you live in California?
    • Yep
  • Have you lived in California in the past 5 years?
    • Yes, since 2014
  • If so, where?
    • Bay Area, first SF, since two years ago Oakland
  • Will you be staying or leaving?
    • Stay for a while, definitely leave at some point
  • Why?
    • because of taxes, because of real estate prices (will probably never buy a house/condo/anything), because of superficiality everywhere in the air (even though its not LA)
  • What is your full time income producing job?
    • Software engineer
Originally posted by @Joseph M. :

@Lee S. what is flyover country in 2018? Many cities have grown and changed.  Texas for example has 3 cities in the Top 10 in the nation by population . Houston (4th largest city in America) is the most diverse city in America today. 

http://www.latimes.com/nation/la-na-houston-divers...

bit cities are IMO pretty comparable as far as culture, politics etc in most places in the country.  My comment referring to "fly over country" was tongue in cheek, I was taking the opposite political bias of some of the posters in the thread to make a point.

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