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Brandon Durant
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Thoughts on Waiving Inspections?

Brandon Durant
  • Rental Property Investor
  • Rhode Island
Posted Nov 18 2023, 07:25

Looking to purchase our first home... have been recommended to waive inspections if we're serious in having an offer accepted (finally)

My question: Would it make sense to waive inspection in this situation and have an experienced builder come out to look at the property at the next open house? Really don't want to get stuck with problems that I cant see with my naked eye for a first home. 

Thank you in advance!

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Dustin Calgaro
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Dustin Calgaro
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Replied Nov 20 2023, 05:08

@Brandon Durant

I agree with what most people are saying here- there isn’t as much competition as there once was and if you don’t have the experience to be confident in what you are doing you should hire an inspector to look at the property for you.

Over the past couple of highly competitive years I have foregone almost all inspections but I have my GC license, I have bought and sold many properties and I am confident in my ability to spot most of the big ticket issues… thus far I have no regrets.

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Crystal Smith
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Crystal Smith
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ModeratorReplied Nov 24 2023, 12:36
Quote from @Brandon Durant:

Looking to purchase our first home... have been recommended to waive inspections if we're serious in having an offer accepted (finally)

My question: Would it make sense to waive inspection in this situation and have an experienced builder come out to look at the property at the next open house? Really don't want to get stuck with problems that I cant see with my naked eye for a first home. 

Thank you in advance!


 I'm coming to this post late but hopefully can provide some useful input. My useful input is "It Depends on the other provisions in your contract" In our realtor state contracts that I use for listed properties there is a provision for an attorney review and inspection period. 


I can choose to waive the inspection without waiving the attorney review but still order an inspection.  The results of the inspection can't be used to cancel or modify the deal, but the attorney review period can still be used to kill the deal.  And we do not have to provide a reason why.  We had many clients who would waive the inspection, knowing that they were still protected because of the attorney review provision.  Check your contract.

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Brandon Durant
  • Rental Property Investor
  • Rhode Island
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Brandon Durant
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  • Rhode Island
Replied Nov 24 2023, 12:59
Quote from @Crystal Smith:
Quote from @Brandon Durant:

Looking to purchase our first home... have been recommended to waive inspections if we're serious in having an offer accepted (finally)

My question: Would it make sense to waive inspection in this situation and have an experienced builder come out to look at the property at the next open house? Really don't want to get stuck with problems that I cant see with my naked eye for a first home. 

Thank you in advance!


 I'm coming to this post late but hopefully can provide some useful input. My useful input is "It Depends on the other provisions in your contract" In our realtor state contracts that I use for listed properties there is a provision for an attorney review and inspection period. 


I can choose to waive the inspection without waiving the attorney review but still order an inspection.  The results of the inspection can't be used to cancel or modify the deal, but the attorney review period can still be used to kill the deal.  And we do not have to provide a reason why.  We had many clients who would waive the inspection, knowing that they were still protected because of the attorney review provision.  Check your contract.


 This is a great response. We did not end up getting the house despite bidding 10% over ask w/ inspection but we will look into this for next time! Thank you

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Pam Brown
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Pam Brown
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Replied Nov 28 2023, 08:29

Always get an inspection :-)

Rather miss out on a deal than get stuck with some major defects that can be missed by the naked eye.  Unless you have a really really good contractor that can essentially do an inspection for you so you feel comfortable waiving the contingency.  

I didn't get to read all of these responses but I did see someone mentioned getting a sewer scope---on an Indianapolis, IN property.  I second that motion because that could save you a lot of $$$$ if it's defective and needs to be replaced. It costs extra to add that to the inspection, but well worth it.

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Bruce Woodruff
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Bruce Woodruff
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Replied Nov 30 2023, 06:32
Quote from @Pam Brown:

Always get an inspection :-)

Rather miss out on a deal than get stuck with some major defects that can be missed by the naked eye.  Unless you have a really really good contractor that can essentially do an inspection for you so you feel comfortable waiving the contingency.  

I didn't get to read all of these responses but I did see someone mentioned getting a sewer scope---on an Indianapolis, IN property.  I second that motion because that could save you a lot of $$$$ if it's defective and needs to be replaced. It costs extra to add that to the inspection, but well worth it.


 Absolutely correct on the sewer scope! They only added additional $300 or so, but can save you $10,000 usually. I would get a sewer scope on every house, even newer ones abs lines....

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Jake Knight
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Jake Knight
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Replied Dec 6 2023, 09:10
Quote from @Greg Scott:
If you are willing to gamble your earnest money, then that is fine.  

Sellers get tired of minor things in the inspection report giving the buyer a chance to renegotiate  the price down.  So, waiving the inspection period, makes your offer stronger. 

That said, I would still do an inspection.  If you find a major flaw that will cost tens of thousands to fix, you want to know before you own it.  It may be worth losing the earnest money to not buy a dog.

 Agree completely, I have very few clients that don't get inspections.  The one client that doesn't always regrets it. You'll be able to make the most informed decision once the inspection report comes back on the health of the property.  Having a builder walk it helps for sure but should not take the place of a licensed inspector doing their thing.

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Darin Tripoli
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Darin Tripoli
  • Rhode Island
Replied Jan 16 2024, 09:41

I would honestly say it depends on your timing and how much time you have to secure your property. You should also get creative. I needed a long term residence recently and lost everything i even bat an eye at due to waived inspections. I got really picky moving forward and extended my finances to cover costs of say a roof / hot water heater etc. I also decided to go with a house with a family currently living in it to help mitigate the risk of having to waive the inspection and give them 90 days to find something, close on and move. My mindset was if its nice enough for this upper middle class family of 4 to live in comfortably I should be able to take the risk with my own inspection. I also took with me a skilled family member anytime they were available and would buy them lunch. I was under a significant time budget and had to act accordingly if i wanted to find something in Rhode Island. I do feel as the market cools and interest rates drop this will no longer be a thing. I highly suggest raising down payment if possible and not waiving inspection. I did not waive appraisal either. It was my understanding that the property had 20 bids on it from one day of open houses and everyone who made consideration waived something.  

TLDR:  I would never recommend this but circumstances at time of purchase are everything 

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Replied Jan 16 2024, 11:30
Quote from @Brandon Durant:

Looking to purchase our first home... have been recommended to waive inspections if we're serious in having an offer accepted (finally)

My question: Would it make sense to waive inspection in this situation and have an experienced builder come out to look at the property at the next open house? Really don't want to get stuck with problems that I cant see with my naked eye for a first home. 

Thank you in advance!

Just because something has been recommended doesn't mean it's good advice. If I recommended you drink 64 ounces of prune juice, is that good advice? Well, it won't kill you, but you will remember the experience for a long time.

What are they hiding that they don't want an inspection?