"Drilling locks" to enter property

8 Replies

If there is a water leak (intentional) from an upper unit into the lower unit, and upper unit tenant (being in the process of eviction) is not allowing property manager to enter it, is property manager within his rights to enter it by drilling locks ?  If he does not, is he being negligent ?

Why would the property manager need to drill out the locks?  Why not just provide notice and use the key to enter?

Apparently the tenant was "hostile" and property manager did not want to endanger himself or his staff...

How is drilling locks LESS hostile than simply using a key to enter?

That is what I am asking about - he DID NOT drill out locks and  as a result the lower unit sustained a major water damage

Originally posted by @Dawn Anastasi:

How is drilling locks LESS hostile than simply using a key to enter?

 lol.. 

Originally posted by @George Zatulovsky:

That is what I am asking about - he DID NOT drill out locks and  as a result the lower unit sustained a major water damage

 My point is that he didn't have to drill out locks, he just had to use a key to enter.  So if he didn't enter and take care of the problem, then yes, he's not doing his job.

lol @DawnAnastasi. I agree, I also thought most rental contracts generally have a clause, to allow entry for any emergencies. You are entitled to protect your property from damage.

In Texas a property owner/manager can contact the Sheriff's office to have a deputy escort them, if they need to enter a property under threat or fear of reprisal.  The Sheriff's office is the same authority here that enforces evictions.

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