Driveway

10 posts by 7 users

Medium 1399546834 avatar bit1232 Shanequa J.
Investor from Houston, TX
631 Posts
145 Votes
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Shanequa J.

Investor from Houston, Texas

Nov 20 '12, 12:15 PM


House is a rental. The neighborhood has a mix of concrete and dirt driveways. The driveway I have is two 7 ft slabs. 1 slab is newer and the other slab is the old stuff with huge rocks in it. The driveway doesn't extend all the way to the street either; it's missing another slab. I plan on ripping out the driveway. Should I redo in concrete or asphalt? If concrete I was thinking about doing the ribbon driveway; 2 strips of concrete with grass in the middle. Comments.



Medium 1399315588 avatar jonk Jon Klaus
Investor from Garland, TX
8543 Posts
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Jon Klaus Verified Moderator Donor

Investor from Garland, Texas

Nov 20 '12, 12:24 PM


The 2 strip concrete drive is "green" and makes a statement in more "hip and socially conscious" areas.

Why? Less impervious space, less rain water run off.

Oh, and its a lot less concrete to buy.



Jon Klaus, SellPropertyFast
E-Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: 214-929-6545


Medium 1412209793 avatar brighterdays Karen Margrave
Brokers-Developers-Licensed G.C. from Orange County, CA
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Karen Margrave Moderator

Brokers-Developers-Licensed G.C. from Orange County, California

Nov 20 '12, 12:46 PM


@Shanequa J. I agree. In fact on the new house we are finishing up, we are doing concrete strips with some type of groundcover in between. Depending on the style of house, you can also use large concrete tiles and do a grid pattern. Good luck.



Medium tmg  1 Karen Margrave, The Margrave Group #00636992
E-Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: 949-933-3955


Medium 1448388825 avatar stevebabiak Steve Babiak
Real Estate Investor from Audubon, PA
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Steve Babiak Verified

Real Estate Investor from Audubon, Pennsylvania

Nov 20 '12, 02:51 PM


The above suggestions are probably OK as long as there is no SNOW to remove ... If you have to deal with snow in the above suggestions, clearing snow off grass might have to happen.



Shanequa J.

Investor from Houston, Texas

Nov 20 '12, 03:32 PM


I spoke to an inspection for the area and he said Fayetteville doesn't want that kind of driveway. I'll go downtown and find out what I can do when I pull the permit.

Yes, the strips are cheaper; that's why I want it. Plus, I think it looks cool. Concrete is $120 a cubic yard here.



Medium 1434819274 avatar ilikemoney Rob K.
Investor from Southeast, MI
2289 Posts
1398 Votes
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Rob K.

Investor from Southeast, Michigan

Nov 20 '12, 03:38 PM


In my area, driveways are usually $4 per square foot to rip out and replace. That is materials and labor. Also, one cubic yard of concrete will give you 81 square feet of driveway.



No avatar medium Eric Blackford
Property Manager from Kissimmee, FL
68 Posts
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Eric Blackford

Property Manager from Kissimmee, Florida

Nov 21 '12, 01:58 PM


I personally think that concrete is a better surface. It'll last longer and hold up / look better over time. Personally, I'm not a big fan of the concrete strips and, yes, I'd be impressed if a municipality allowed you to put it in. Now, that being said, I know that where I live, concrete flatwork does not require a municipal permit. I literally doubled the size of my concrete driveway without any permit.



Medium 1399549246 avatar geojames James H.
Investor from Fort Worth, TX
1494 Posts
411 Votes
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James H.

Investor from Fort Worth, Texas

Nov 21 '12, 02:09 PM


Does the street have a curb? You'll probably need a permit to join the street - probably should call the permitting department and find out what the requirements are on that. My rental just has a dirt driveway. Is the existing driveway functional or is it all cracked up and deterioated? Even if it doesn't have the same finish slab to slab, I'd leave it alone if it was still structurally sound just to save the money. Its doubtful you will get more rent for the driveway and it doesn't do much in regards to maintenance expenses, if anything.

But to answer the question you asked: Concrete all the way. Asphalt is glorified dirt in my opinion (insofar as being used in slow traffic areas). It will not have near the life that concrete will have. I also wouldn't bother with the strips as I personally don't like that kind of driveway. There are better ways to make a "green" driveway. The problem with "green" pavement is that is main function is to allow moisture to drain into the subgrade. Saturation of subgrade soils is the number one enemey of all pavements. Ironically, a lot of architects like to design green pavement sections and then the engineers make them put plastic underneath...



Shanequa J.

Investor from Houston, Texas

Nov 22 '12, 09:09 AM


Brian Hoyt Yes, I will have to get a permit. It's functional, but it's an eyesore. Everything else is getting rehabbed. Why stop at the driveway?



James H.

Investor from Fort Worth, Texas

Nov 22 '12, 10:53 AM
1 vote


I might consider painting it rather than ripping it out. Or just ripping out the section that shows the larger aggregate. Hard to have a solid opinion about what to do without a picture.



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