Cleveland Older Homes Advice

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I recently started investing in Cle and looking to add more. I've narrowed down the neighborhood/zip codes but as you are aware most of the housing stock is old. My SFH are post 1950s but some of the multi fam I am interested in are built in the early 1900s (over 100 years old). While my preference would be to find something past 1950s or so, I know many of you invest in older homes. Any advice/feedback on what to look for in older homes? I would def be getting a home inspection but curious about your strategy. Or do you just walk away from homes built before a certain period no matter how appealing the numbers are? Appreciate it!

Originally posted by @Amit Raghavan :

I recently started investing in Cle and looking to add more. I've narrowed down the neighborhood/zip codes but as you are aware most of the housing stock is old. My SFH are post 1950s but some of the multi fam I am interested in are built in the early 1900s (over 100 years old). While my preference would be to find something past 1950s or so, I know many of you invest in older homes. Any advice/feedback on what to look for in older homes? I would def be getting a home inspection but curious about your strategy. Or do you just walk away from homes built before a certain period no matter how appealing the numbers are? Appreciate it!

Biggest thing you may encounter with the century homes that you won't encounter with post 1950's is galvanized drain piping in the walls as well as knob and tube wiring. If the galvanized piping breaks or start leaking you'll spend a few grand replacing them. Gotta watch our for your crew with those massive pipes. I've seen guys open up walls and have a big old broken galvanized sewage pipe fall down and hit them or cut them open, not fun lol. As for the knob and tube you are not permitted to install it in new construction or anything but per code you do not need to go into the walls to replace it. I'd say 95%+ of Cleveland housing stock has got some knob and tube in the walls.