Towns similar to Newburg but with less crime ?

18 Replies

Any recommendations on upstate /westchester towns that are along Hudson , low cost to buy with hopes /potential of the market rises over the next few years. Somewhere that’s a little better than Newburg ?

Port Jervis and Middletown have cheap properties and less crime not quite along the Hudson though. Beacon is an upcoming town on the Hudson in Dutchess County, also take a look at Poughkeepsie. 

city Poughkeepsie 

How far north are you willing to go? Kingston is trying hard to revitalize, Catskill has great returns on c grade properties, liberty has really great rental returns and climbing with the employment jump from the Monticello casino. Don't bank on that lasting though. If you are into vacation rentals instead, with a bit more risk and much higher returns the Catskills are littered with cheap houses for rehab that can bring 25k+ a year in income. All depends on your goals and willingness to head a touch further north.

@Domion Pontrelli if you could please keep usupdated on your choice.

I spent a bit of time on this subject from 2008-2017. Hours of research on line and a few hundred days spent in the cities you mentioned and more.

I bought a 3 family in bed stuy in 06/07, I was jumping up and down screaming buy here til about 2012.

I always looked in Brooklyn but money was too tight for me to get the down payment for another 6 or 7 figure house.

I looked at the Bronx many, many times. But I just never got that excited. I still like port Morris. But never bought.

So on to your question. Little background......I work full time. In my job I have a lot of flexibility. I only need to do 40 hours a week and I can do them whenever. Overnight weekends Holidays etc. I can do 9,15, 24 hours at a time. So I can spend 2-3 weekdays in real estate. And I did. Many, many days I would wake up and hit the road for real estate work. 8-10 hours spent talking to agents, sellers, landlords, cops and firemen. Researching the best town to invest.

I researched in Newburgh, Kingston, Poughkeepsie, hudson(that’s one I should have jumped on) Beacon(there’s another) new haven, Bridgeport, Waterbury, Hartford and a few days here and there in Ossining, Peekskill and assorted towns throughout Connecticut. I also briefly looked at Liberty.

New haven and Kingston were Newburgh’s biggest competition. New haven was a bit too pricey...I had missed the boat I think. Kingston was twice the distance from my house. I would pass newburgh and drive another 40-50 minutes.

Newburgh was my #1.

As for crime look up @Sarah Hooff or @Rebecca Devlin I see them walking all over newburgh and they don’t seem too scared.

Originally posted by @Jeremy Booth :

Port Jervis and Middletown have cheap properties and less crime not quite along the Hudson though. Beacon is an upcoming town on the Hudson in Dutchess County, also take a look at Poughkeepsie. 

 I've never worked in Port Jervis, but from what I hear it's not as thriving as Middletown. Harder to find tenants there as well. 

I agree on Poughkeepsie. I have a couple properties there, and I'm looking for more. 

@john hickey  ThankU so much John. I will Definitely keep you updated. I jave Only heard and read about Newburg. I’m looking to visit hopefully by the end of the month.  I work A full time job as well but within this next year or so looking to pull the trigger on something.  Ny tri state area is too expensive for me. I owned A few houses out in orange nj is a rough part of town so I have an idea of what could possibility come with the territory with investing in Newburg. Thank u for your feedback I’ll let you know I soend some time there.  

Originally posted by @David MacClintock :

How far north are you willing to go? Kingston is trying hard to revitalize, Catskill has great returns on c grade properties, liberty has really great rental returns and climbing with the employment jump from the Monticello casino. Don't bank on that lasting though. If you are into vacation rentals instead, with a bit more risk and much higher returns the Catskills are littered with cheap houses for rehab that can bring 25k+ a year in income. All depends on your goals and willingness to head a touch further north.

@david maclintock thank u for your feedback. I have no limit on how far up I would go upstate as long as I could Form a good relationship with property managers in the area.  Yeah those vacation towns Def have cheap properties and nice layouts. Not sure I have the stomach for vacation rentals tho 

@John Hickey , thanks for highlighting  this thread for me. @Domion Pontrelli , you pose an interesting question!

Without getting too heavy into the history, Newburgh is a very interesting case, and one that deserves special consideration beyond the ticker tape of contemporary news stories. The city was designed to fail in a very particular way that promoted crime, slumlording, dependence on social housing subsidies, and the poverty industry. Many current reports about crime and danger in Newburgh are thinly veiled racial slurs, and the entire history of Urban Renewal (when the main section of downtown Newburgh was raised to the ground in the 60s) was designed to 'reinvigorate' the areas of town where people of color lived. There is a good history-in-review here: http://newburghrestoration.com/blog/2018/01/17/los...
A huge community lost its housing, economic base, and sense of place, and desperation, crime, corruption, and insular thinking certainly filled in the gaps that were opened wide. 


I live in downtown Newburgh and there isn't a street I won't walk down. I'm a real estate agent focused exclusively on the City of Newburgh, and my advice to clients buying in the city: don't join a gang, and if you're buying drugs, pay your dealer. But I figure this is sound advice in most situations. 

My feeling about living in the city is that crime certainly does happen, usually out of economic necessity and/or a real addiction, mostly among people who know each other. In a very few tragic cases, a person is in the wrong place at the wrong time. However, 99.9% of crime is not random; I've never heard of anyone getting randomly mugged in Newburgh, for example. I feel like you'd just see them again the next day down the block! It's a small town at the end of the day, and there are LOTS of quality eyes on the street holding down the block. 
The police force has good leadership and picks their battles; they don't bother with low-violence offenders like the corner weed dealer and don't bother slapping misdemeanors on people drinking or smoking on their porch on a Sunday afternoon, but they do go after violent gangs and groups aggressively and have made progress over the last couple of years. I'm a big fan of urban life in Newburgh for myself and my family. Let me know when you're up and I'll be happy to grab a coffee! 

Wow. Lots of good insight here. I'm following this for the next few years.

Originally posted by @Sarah Hooff :

@John Hickey , thanks for highlighting  this thread for me. @Domion Pontrelli, you pose an interesting question!

Without getting too heavy into the history, Newburgh is a very interesting case, and one that deserves special consideration beyond the ticker tape of contemporary news stories. The city was designed to fail in a very particular way that promoted crime, slumlording, dependence on social housing subsidies, and the poverty industry. Many current reports about crime and danger in Newburgh are thinly veiled racial slurs, and the entire history of Urban Renewal (when the main section of downtown Newburgh was raised to the ground in the 60s) was designed to 'reinvigorate' the areas of town where people of color lived. There is a good history-in-review here: http://newburghrestoration.com/blog/2018/01/17/los...
A huge community lost its housing, economic base, and sense of place, and desperation, crime, corruption, and insular thinking certainly filled in the gaps that were opened wide. 


I live in downtown Newburgh and there isn't a street I won't walk down. I'm a real estate agent focused exclusively on the City of Newburgh, and my advice to clients buying in the city: don't join a gang, and if you're buying drugs, pay your dealer. But I figure this is sound advice in most situations. 

My feeling about living in the city is that crime certainly does happen, usually out of economic necessity and/or a real addiction, mostly among people who know each other. In a very few tragic cases, a person is in the wrong place at the wrong time. However, 99.9% of crime is not random; I've never heard of anyone getting randomly mugged in Newburgh, for example. I feel like you'd just see them again the next day down the block! It's a small town at the end of the day, and there are LOTS of quality eyes on the street holding down the block. 
The police force has good leadership and picks their battles; they don't bother with low-violence offenders like the corner weed dealer and don't bother slapping misdemeanors on people drinking or smoking on their porch on a Sunday afternoon, but they do go after violent gangs and groups aggressively and have made progress over the last couple of years. I'm a big fan of urban life in Newburgh for myself and my family. Let me know when you're up and I'll be happy to grab a coffee! 

 @sarah hoof

This is fantastic background and point of few. thank you Sarah. This is refreshing to hear and I wanted to hear this side coin.  thank you so much . No doubt about it , I'll let you know I'm headed out there for a tour. 

And thank you again @john hickey

@Domion Pontrelli I bought two properties in Newburgh last year and every day I am looking to buy more. I owe this all to my friend @Nadene Grey who bought several about five years ago and just another last year. We have homes across the street from each other and do not plan on going anywhere. Mind you, we both worked in some of NYC's prestigious neighborhoods and Newburgh is a breath of fresh air for us. We run though the city when the weather permits; we never feel unsafe. Sure, there are shady parts but no more than one would find in pockets of Manhattan. Everyone makes eye contact and says hello. Despite much of the bad rap that Newburgh has been given in previous decades, never have I had an encounter that has made me prefer Soho or the god forsaken Meatpacking District and the $25 martini's they offer. 

Investors, home buyers, transplants and alike do not just look at the crime and drugs; which are on a fierce trajectory of decline but the rising potential and rehabilitation in addition to the charm and history that Newburgh offers. 

There is a built in network and support of homeowners, agents and investors @John Hickey @Paul Tarsney @Sarah Hooff @Michael Robinson and many others that I am forgetting to mention, all of whom are there to nudge anyone and each other in the right direction and are a plethora of knowledge. Then there is @Michael Haberman who offers HML when funds are needed for acquisitions and/or rehabbing.

Not a week goes by when I am in NYC; I still work in Soho, when I do not hear chatter about another person moving to Newburgh or investing in the city. The word is getting out. 


I went into contract on this one yesterday for 69k 2 family on Renwick.  

It was a Fannie Mae that came out of first look.  Cash thanks to @Michael Haberman

Originally posted by @Rebecca Devlin :

@Domion Pontrelli I bought two properties in Newburgh last year and every day I am looking to buy more. I owe this all to my friend @Nadene Grey who bought several about five years ago and just another last year. We have homes across the street from each other and do not plan on going anywhere. Mind you, we both worked in some of NYC's prestigious neighborhoods and Newburgh is a breath of fresh air for us. We run though the city when the weather permits; we never feel unsafe. Sure, there are shady parts but no more than one would find in pockets of Manhattan. Everyone makes eye contact and says hello. Despite much of the bad rap that Newburgh has been given in previous decades, never have I had an encounter that has made me prefer Soho or the god forsaken Meatpacking District and the $25 martini's they offer. 

Investors, home buyers, transplants and alike do not just look at the crime and drugs; which are on a fierce trajectory of decline but the rising potential and rehabilitation in addition to the charm and history that Newburgh offers. 

There is a built in network and support of homeowners, agents and investors @John Hickey @Paul Tarsney @Sarah Hooff @Michael Robinson and many others that I am forgetting to mention, all of whom are there to nudge anyone and each other in the right direction and are a plethora of knowledge. Then there is @Michael Haberman who offers HML when funds are needed for acquisitions and/or rehabbing.

Not a week goes by when I am in NYC; I still work in Soho, when I do not hear chatter about another person moving to Newburgh or investing in the city. The word is getting out. 


 This is refreshing to hear this. To hear everyone on this thread. Granted I’m in Brooklyn and hear only the bad things about Newburg. I’m glad i made getting this info from the source.  I can’t wait to visit.   I live In Brooklyn but have had properties in east orange and whole sale a few in Newark. Thank u @Rebecca Devlin

@Domion Pontrelli need to get in the car!

https://www.facebook.com/nancylaynephotography/posts/258317331376528

Sorry it won’t link....

https://www.facebook.com/nancylaynephotography/posts/258317331376528

Ah here it is. I’ve been hearing this for months but now it’s reallg getting crazy.  Seems like every block has 2-3 projects.  

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