Doing the work yourself after insurance claim?

6 Replies

So a big hail storm just came through town and shred a large part of the ciy with tennis to baseball size hail and 70+ mph winds. This storm took out two windows, a couple of pickets, a window on the shed and hammered the roof. My question is on a claim that is asking for receipts to prove the work was done, do I actually have to hire someone to install the windows or replacing the roof if I am fully capable? The insurance company wants estimates for the work prior to doing so as expected which isn't a problem, however is there anything problematic about doing the work myself? I am sending before photos to the company and about to go get some estimates, but I thought I'd ask to see if anyone else has come across this before? TIA for all your replies!

The insurance company will not let you profit from a loss, so doing the work yourself could appear that way.

They won't prohibit you from doing the work, but All they would probably pay you for is the supplies and not labor if you do yourself.

Are you looking to get your labor included the loss settlement?

No not necessarily, I was just curious as to if I put in a claim today (mainly on the broken windows aspect) to go ahead and get them taken care of instead of leaving a tarp on them until they can get me the money. i.e. go buy a new window and replace it and then have them refund me for costs, time, and labor or if they restrictions on that. The roof can obviously wait but its been storming here and we've gotten a lot of unexpected rain and I'm not sure as to if there is more to come. I have tarped the exposed one but with winds and downpour...there is only so much that tarp can handle

Each insurance company has different rules and must say that you need to get three bids from license businesses, and if you do the repairs yourself; it must be in line with others on the price and labor cost.


Joe Gore

You should always have a contractor do the work for you. Unrepaired damage or damage that was done by a unlicensed individual could possibly be excluded in future claims, depending on what compnay you insure with. Also you will want to check your policy for;
1. A wind and hail exclusion. Most insurance companies in areas with a lot of wind and hail claims exclude the coverage from the policy.
2. A wind and hail deductible. In areas where wind/hail claims are less prevalent but still higher than average will include a deductible of around 1 - 2% of your coverage A limit.

If you have the exclusion or the deductivble and the amount is higher that it cost for you to do it yourself don't raise your rates by fililng a claim.

Ronnie is right. I would have a licensed contractor due the work. Some insurance carriers will guarantee the work for a period of time, if done by their preferred contractors.

I am in the industry and have worked for 4 different companies. Each one has different rules on how they adjust claims. Depending on the skill of the adjustor, they may only take one contractor estimate if it looks reasonable. This has been my experience.

Thinking through the deductible is important. Because of the large amount of wind/hail in the middle part of the country, separate deductibles for these types of losses are common, and percentage deductibles can be confusing.

For example, if you have a 1% on a dwelling covered at 100K. Then the deductible will be $1000. Many consumers think the % applies to the amount of the loss.

As the owner, you are doing the right thing and preventing more damage.

Thanks for the help guys and the experience. Just one of the many reasons I love this site. I'm just trying to make the best of this storm stuff and not have the 3% deductible cost me so much out of pocket on the 100k so figured if I wrote in my labor for putting in new windows that would alleviate some of the bulk if I could charge a little labor

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