Has anyone used "Flood Guard" for basement drains?

3 Replies

We recently had massive flooding in our area due to an ancient infrastructure combined with massive rain. Thousands of basements were flooded. I recently heard about this product and purchased a few. I'm curious if anyone has ever used it and knows if it works?

You drop it in your basement floor drain and turn the four screws. The rubber ring gets compressed and forms a seal inside your drain pipe. Water can go down, but if sewage starts to back up, the hanging rubber ball rises and forms a seal to prevent sewage from coming into the basement.

It sounds good in theory. Any feedback would be appreciated.

Giving a bump to this one...

Never heard of it, so I did some online reading because I'd quite interested if it worked.  Seems like there is some high praise for it in general.  However my question is this:  OK, so say it successfully keeps the water from coming up out of the floor drains in a basement.  That's great and may solve many otherwise problematic situations.  But, as water seeks its own level, aren't the basement fixtures (if any) -- toilets and sinks -- at risk next in significant backups? 

Originally posted by @Kurt F.:

Giving a bump to this one...

Never heard of it, so I did some online reading because I'd quite interested if it worked.  Seems like there is some high praise for it in general.  However my question is this:  OK, so say it successfully keeps the water from coming up out of the floor drains in a basement.  That's great and may solve many otherwise problematic situations.  But, as water seeks its own level, aren't the basement fixtures (if any) -- toilets and sinks -- at risk next in significant backups? 

I thought about that. You are correct, but it would have to get that high. For example, if the top of your laundry tub is three feet high, your neighbor's basements would all have three feet of human sewage before you got any. I had four basements flood during the storm and three of them were between 1.5 and 3 feet.

One of my houses got 5.5 feet during the flood. I installed these in both floor drains. I told the tenant that if we ever get a massive storm like that again to put the plug in the laundry room drain and put some bricks on top of it to hold it down. Water will take the path of least resistance, so whoever doesn't protect their floor drains will get hit first.

In many areas you shouldn't be sending rain water into the sewer systems.  A basement drainage system should be completely separate and either pumped outside with a sump pump, or pitched directly outside if its a walkout.

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