How to fix this window?

23 Replies

One of the panes (left side, middle) has a BB gun hole through it.

How does fix this on this style window??

Debating whether I should replace the whole window or not.  Plannign for it to be a rental, but want to make it nice.

Is the window currently a double-pane window or is it very old?  If it's an old window, consider just replacing it with a double-pane vinyl energy efficient window.  If you do a nice picture window, you'll have more visibility to the outside versus all those smaller panes.  It will really open the room.

Even if it's "just a rental" you want the property to appeal to quality tenants, and keep in mind an exit strategy in the future -- resale value.

Hi Dawn,

I aim for my rentals to all be very nice.  I don't mean to imply "just a rental".

I just don't know if there is a good way to fix the single pain.  I think overall, they are already double-pane and seem to be in decent shape.  I just don't know how to do this one myself.  

I figure if I call a window company, they'll just want to put in replacements.

Can you not contact a glass & mirror company to come and replace piece of glass?

Thanks i wasn't sure who to contact. I will check with a glass and mirror company. 

If it were me, I'd take the measurements, go to Lowes, get a piece of plexiglass cut, take the old glass out using a heat gun to soften the caulk holding the glass in and replace it with plexiglass.


Gail

@Dan D.   if you measure the glass you can buy for cheap at Lowes/Home Depot or a glass place.  Not hard to replace, especially with smaller pieces - just glue it in with clear door/window caulking. 

Replace the glass either doing it yourself or call a glass/mirror repair guy. Replacement of the whole window will be expensive.

Thanks for the feedback.  I appreciate it.

This might be a dumb question, but if it is double-pane, is it one "piece" of glass manufactured with the two panes, or does the window itself actually have two separate panes sandwiched together.  (where I am replacing two sheets of glass instead of one combined/manufactured double pane).

I feel dumb asking because normally I'm pretty handy, I just haven't done windows before.  (About the only thing I haven't done).

This post has been removed.

Originally posted by @Dan D. :

Thanks for the feedback.  I appreciate it.

This might be a dumb question, but if it is double-pane, is it one "piece" of glass manufactured with the two panes, or does the window itself actually have two separate panes sandwiched together.  (where I am replacing two sheets of glass instead of one combined/manufactured double pane).

I feel dumb asking because normally I'm pretty handy, I just haven't done windows before.  (About the only thing I haven't done).

 Double pane windows are typically two individuals panes with some type of gas, which acts as an insulating factor, between them.  Once one of the panes is busted, the gas escapes and that pane loses its energy efficiency.  Does that mean that the individual pane can't be replaced?  No, often times they can but it will depend on your frame whether you can replace it easily or not.  Some frames are formed around the glass and the labor involved in replacing the pane is darn near as much as replacing the entire window.  

@Dan D.  - our last house was older and had a few broken windows when we bought the place.  It took me FOREVER to try to find somebody that would come out and replace them (it's Long Island - so that probably counts for something here).  Literally every glass/window company we called was only interested in replacing the entire window and every other window in our house.  Finally I started calling individuals and companies marketed specifically as "Glaziers" and after a couple of calls finally got somebody out to the house to individually replace the window panes.  Best of Luck!

@Dan D.    I think @Dawn Anastasi  gave the best advice. That looks like a home-made window. You could also reframe the opening for something dfferent (e.g. a triple unit). It would be worth it to have an attractive, leak-proof, air tight window.  

What is that hanging down over the window?  


We took the piece out of the window (just the top half) that was broken and took it down to a glass shop and they replaced it. We also were able to order a double pane insert to replace a solid side panel and then insert it but it was the only window there was nothing to match.  Call a local window shop  and see how long will it take to get it done.  You could need to have someone come out but in that case I would likely replace the unit. Of course I like windows that open and these don't seem to.

Another option if you are replacing the window is to modify to another window type. We just took out a bunch of single panes like this (same set up but  all awnings that open) and put in a slider in one location and set of double hungs in a another. It depends on the style of the rest of the windows in the house and whether you will replace them.  If you go with a dead light or fixed pane and it under a certain size you will possibly find it cheaper and easier to replace the whole window, all 9 panes. If this is a living room there are lots of nice options depending on the house style including a middle dead light and side opening windows.

Originally posted by @Gail K. :

If it were me, I'd take the measurements, go to Lowes, get a piece of plexiglass cut, take the old glass out using a heat gun to soften the caulk holding the glass in and replace it with plexiglass.


Gail

 that's all we do & it works very well but it is very sharp so handle with leather gloves!!!

The last similar 'glass' pane we replaced through a glass company here cost the tenants $108 as they broke it with a step ladder. 

Originally posted by @Account Closed :

@Dan D.   I think @Dawn Anastasi  gave the best advice. That looks like a home-made window. You could also reframe the opening for something dfferent (e.g. a triple unit). It would be worth it to have an attractive, leak-proof, air tight window.  

What is that hanging down over the window?  


 On the outside, that is a very attractive (NOT) metal awning.  Last weekend the metal awning came down.  If you'd like to purchase a slightly rusted, repainted, brown awning, I'd gladly post an add over in the marketplace where we can discuss making a fair deal on it.  ;-)

I think I'll be able to pop one of the panes out for replacement.  I've debated replacing the whole thing, but I kind of like the look of it so I'm still debating.  Depends on what my replacement glass cost would be and how difficult that proves to be.

I just closed on this house end of December and it needs a bit of everything.

Just got a furnace into it.  Want to see if I get get the well to work next.  (Not on city water or sewer, but might be able to move it on to it).  Sorry getting off topic.

Originally posted by @Pat L. :
Originally posted by @Gail Kaitschuck:

If it were me, I'd take the measurements, go to Lowes, get a piece of plexiglass cut, take the old glass out using a heat gun to soften the caulk holding the glass in and replace it with plexiglass.


Gail

 that's all we do & it works very well but it is very sharp so handle with leather gloves!!!

The last similar 'glass' pane we replaced through a glass company here cost the tenants $108 as they broke it with a step ladder. 

 Doesn't a plexiglass window look cheap and out of place?

I'm trying to attract A-level tennants.  I would think they could "see through" my cost cutting ways with plexiglass and think it's a cheap rental with a lower level of care by the landlord.

Sometimes plexiglass is more expensive than glass, but it's easier to work with.


 Doesn't a plexiglass window look cheap and out of place?

I'm trying to attract A-level tennants.  I would think they could "see through" my cost cutting ways with plexiglass and think it's a cheap rental with a lower level of care by the landlord.

The aged design of your window doesn't strike me as being conducive to a high end rental. I prefer to replace all the 'old' windows on our properties regardless of tenant 'alphabet'. But rather than pay prohibitive 'special order' pricing we 'lexan' the panes of older difficult to replace window sizes (set in stone walls). 

Yet on a recent acquisition I replaced a similar 'dated look' 107"x54" window with a vinyl $993 Pella contractor 'special order' return for $199 including FREE delivery from Lowes. The tenant then complained that the old very drafty window was more appealing because it was wood, (though cracked & dry rotted) ??

Originally posted by @Dan D. :
Originally posted by @Pat L.:
Originally posted by @Gail Kaitschuck:

If it were me, I'd take the measurements, go to Lowes, get a piece of plexiglass cut, take the old glass out using a heat gun to soften the caulk holding the glass in and replace it with plexiglass.


Gail

 that's all we do & it works very well but it is very sharp so handle with leather gloves!!!

The last similar 'glass' pane we replaced through a glass company here cost the tenants $108 as they broke it with a step ladder. 

 Doesn't a plexiglass window look cheap and out of place?

I'm trying to attract A-level tennants.  I would think they could "see through" my cost cutting ways with plexiglass and think it's a cheap rental with a lower level of care by the landlord.

 At a first glance, it's hard to tell the difference. Plexi does reflect light slightly differently but as Pat L. mentioned, I think that minor detail is the least of your issues considering the window frame that's there.  Just know that over time, if the window is in direct sunlight, it will start to yellow whereas glass won't.  

Take the whole window out , reframe and replace with some double hung windows . Trim around the opening . If its a higher end rental , remove the window and awning , reframe and make a plant window .  This is building a box about  12 to 18 inches out then installing the new windows in that . It will make the room seem much larger .

Originally posted by @Matthew Paul :

Take the whole window out , reframe and replace with some double hung windows . Trim around the opening . If its a higher end rental , remove the window and awning , reframe and make a plant window .  This is building a box about  12 to 18 inches out then installing the new windows in that . It will make the room seem much larger .

 (Awning is gone already)

Are you suggesting putting in a bay window?  When I googled plant window I was able to come across somethign like this.

I was out at the house today and I started taking some of the trim off.  I'm thinking replacing the hole unit is the way to go.

This house needs everything, and I'll post a diary when I'm closer to done.  (This is a nine month project for reasons I'll go into later).

That would work , they arent cheap , But they really open a room up . Sometimes if you go to a window distributor they have windows that were measured wrong and sell them for cheap .

Hi Dan,

I can understand the reason why you might want to install a totally new window and I am with you if the one you have is really bad. Depending on where the house is and rental prices in a given area, I might or might not put the money into the house.

where is the how and what is the ARV?

If you are still in the need of the window, IM me and I can get you some local contacts to either buy a window to install yourself, or to have someone come out to install it for you.

Dave

St Paul, Mn

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