how to connect washer to 3/8 compression water line

12 Replies

How would you connect a washer to the 3/8 compression line ? the washer needs to be installed in the apartment – the only source of water is 3/8 compressin under the sink

I believe washer line is ¾”


http://www.homedepot.com/p/Watts-3-4-in-x-3-4-in-x-5-ft-Stainless-Steel-Washing-Machine-Hoses-2-Pack-2PBSPW60-1212/100038496

now I am looking for some kind of transition to go from ¾ to 3/8 compression.

Would it be better to pick up 3/8 compression to ½ FIP first – standard water line

http://www.homedepot.com/p/BrassCraft-3-8-in-Compression-x-1-2-in-FIP-x-16-in-Braided-Polymer-Faucet-Connector-B1-16A-F/100056596

and then go from ½ FIP to ¾ ? I appreciate any ideas. 

@Marcin G.  

should have something similar at HD

http://www.amazon.com/Eastman-41042-Stainless-Stee...

@Marcin G.  

http://www.homedepot.com/p/Watts-3-8-in-x-3-8-in-x...

This should work for you.

  • hire a plumber - it would be done correct and with warranty. And keep them on file.

Sure, you might be able to do it yourself, but what's more expensive, hiring a plumber or water damage? 

I'm just a bit concerned that this will be connected to the line under the sink as opposed to a dedicated washing machine line. 

You can 'adapt' a 3/8 line to the washer but the machine will fill slowly, causing it to run longer and waste money/energy. Can you tee off 'downstream' of the 3/8 connection to a bigger supply?

Originally posted by @Ryan Naylor :
  • hire a plumber - it would be done correct and with warranty. And keep them on file.

Sure, you might be able to do it yourself, but what's more expensive, hiring a plumber or water damage? 

I'm just a bit concerned that this will be connected to the line under the sink as opposed to a dedicated washing machine line. 

 if I do that I might as well come back to cozy, protective 9 and 5 and see other folks get rich in real estate. if there is a leak you will see that. it is not hidden in the walls. I am not talking about sweating copper lines myself. this is is simple plug and play...;-) all I need is proper parts and a little teflon tape.

Originally posted by @Jeremy Tillotson :

@Marcin G. 

http://www.homedepot.com/p/Watts-3-8-in-x-3-8-in-x...

This should work for you.

 thanks, I am talking about washing machine not dishwasher but the concept is the same I think. I will try

3/8" is considered acceptable for the following

Lavatories - < 1.5 GPM; Kitchen Faucets < 1.8 GPM; Toilets - 1.28 GPF & Shower heads - 1.75 GPM

However, depending on your water supply PSI the pressure drop on a 3/8" supply line is considerable compared to 1/2" and 3/4" feeds, (& may not meet code). Assuming the washing machine demands a 2.5 GPM fill rate (as per your mention of it having 3/4" feed lines) you would need at least 1/2" for the washing machine to fill in a reasonable amount of time.

Originally posted by @Marcin G. :
Originally posted by @Ryan Naylor:
  • hire a plumber - it would be done correct and with warranty. And keep them on file.

Sure, you might be able to do it yourself, but what's more expensive, hiring a plumber or water damage? 

I'm just a bit concerned that this will be connected to the line under the sink as opposed to a dedicated washing machine line. 

 if I do that I might as well come back to cozy, protective 9 and 5 and see other folks get rich in real estate. if there is a leak you will see that. it is not hidden in the walls. I am not talking about sweating copper lines myself. this is is simple plug and play...;-) all I need is proper parts and a little teflon tape

Sounds good. 

It doesn't seem as if a 3/8 supply line will supply enough water for washing machine. It may take longer to fill but the water supply during the rinse and spin  cycles will be much less so in my opinion the machine may not function properly, and more importantly a 3/8 supply may not meet plumbing code as I have never seen a washing machine supply less then 1/2 inch. Check the plumbing code, check the manufacturers recommendations and make sure its done properly.

you should just go back to where the 3/8 is feed from the main line and run new 1/2" line so it is done correctly and you don't starve the washing machine. I would consider getting someone who knows some plumbing to assist you. A plumber is valuable not for the labor of assembling the system but more so for doing it correctly and with the knowledge backing it. By running the line new at the right size you will also be able to install arrested to eliminate water hammer as is code as well. Lastly, with compression you do not need Teflon tape as the treads are just to create the compression not create a seal.

Originally posted by @Ryan Naylor :
Originally posted by @Marcin G.:
Originally posted by @Ryan Naylor:
  • hire a plumber - it would be done correct and with warranty. And keep them on file.

Sure, you might be able to do it yourself, but what's more expensive, hiring a plumber or water damage? 

I'm just a bit concerned that this will be connected to the line under the sink as opposed to a dedicated washing machine line. 

 if I do that I might as well come back to cozy, protective 9 and 5 and see other folks get rich in real estate. if there is a leak you will see that. it is not hidden in the walls. I am not talking about sweating copper lines myself. this is is simple plug and play...;-) all I need is proper parts and a little teflon tape

Sounds good. 

 I'm with you, just let it go. LOL

@Marcin G.  As others have said: a 3/8" supply line is not adequate for a washing machine and is not to code. Not to be unkind but, if you want to "...get rich in real estate..." practice doing things the right way.  

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