Flame retardent lumber and ply wood in WIchita County Texas area

11 Replies

Have found a property I am seriously looking at.  Needs new roof from deck up. Have not been able to source a supplier for fire retardant  ply wood and lumber. Any One know of something close and preferably the cheapest source ? also need  cheapest source of cement in bags for part of this place. 

Originally posted by @BA R. :

Have found a property I am seriously looking at.  Needs new roof from deck up. Have not been able to source a supplier for fire retardant  ply wood and lumber. Any One know of something close and preferably the cheapest source ? also need  cheapest source of cement in bags for part of this place. 

 Is there a reason you are using flame retardant lumber instead or regular lumber?

Assuming you made a typo and mean Wichita County Texas there is a Home Depot in Wichita Falls Texas. 

Best source  for code I could find was Wichita county  web site and they use 2009 International building code on 1 and 2 family residential. It specifically says for places in side WF city limits but since I cant find any thing out about is Burkburnett easier on code, I'm figuring that is what I have to do. Apparently I have to pull a permit to do this. Code says flame retardant believe it or not.  If I' m wrong and can get buy with  cheaper stuff that would be great.  Property is in Burkburnett but i  cant find any thing  specific except link to Wichita county.

Any ideas are welcome.

PS looked up Home depot and lowes,. could not find flame retardant ply wood. 

I would like to help with this. Can you cite the code you are attempting to comply with? I have replaced decking on roofs in Wichita Falls, and have never been required to use anything other than standard decking from Home Depot.

I suggest you call Building Inspection and ask about the regulations regarding roof decking specific to your project. 
You can find more information here: http://www.wichitafallstx.gov/index.aspx?nid=745

Originally posted by @BA R. :

Any ideas are welcome.

Unless somebody on this forum works for the Burkburnett building dept and will be doing the roof inspection on your house, I'd simply Google Burkburnett Texas building dept, find their phone number and call them and ask them exactly what the code requirement is. 

http://publicecodes.cyberregs.com/icod/irc/2009/icod_irc_2009_8_sec003.htm

this is straight off the International code 2009  1 and 2 family residential code page online . I emailed the city manager about some other questions. like since it will be owner occupied can I live in it while roofing, do I have to get a demolition permit, etc. I figured I'd wait til I got answers on that. Plus , verbal answers kind of bother me since I cant prove them. Emailing inspector would work though if i can get an answer.  If I am misunderstanding this that would be GREAT!





 R803 ROOF SHEATHING



R803.1 Lumber sheathing.
Allowable spans for lumber used as roof sheathing shall conform to Table R803.1. Spaced lumber sheathing for wood shingle and shake roofing shall conform to the requirements of Sections R905.7 and R905.8. Spaced lumber sheathing is not allowed in Seismic Design Category D2.



TABLE R803.1 MINIMUM THICKNESS OF LUMBER ROOF SHEATHING



RAFTER OR BEAM SPACING (inches) MINIMUM NET THICKNESS (inches)
24 5/8
48a 11/2 T & G
60b
72c



For SI: 1 inch = 25.4 mm.

a. Minimum 270 Fb, 340,000 E.

b. Minimum 420 Fb, 660,000 E.

c. Minimum 600 Fb, 1,150,000 E.



R803.2 Wood structural panel sheathing.

R803.2.1 Identification and grade. Wood structural panels shall conform to DOC PS 1, DOC PS 2 or, when manufactured in Canada, CSA O437 or CSA O325, and shall be identified by a grade mark or certificate of inspection issued by an approved agency. Wood structural panels shall comply with the grades specified in Table R503.2.1.1(1). R803.2.1.1 Exposure durability. All wood structural panels, when designed to be permanently exposed in outdoor applications, shall be of an exterior exposure durability. Wood structural panel roof sheathing exposed to the underside may be of interior type bonded with exterior glue, identified as Exposure 1. R803.2.1.2 Fire-retardant-treated plywood. The allowable unit stresses for fire-retardant-treated plywood, including fastener values, shall be developed from an approved method of investigation that considers the effects of anticipated temperature and humidity to which the fire-retardant-treated plywood will be subjected, the type of treatment and redrying process. The fire-retardant-treated plywood shall be graded by an approved agency. R803.2.2 Allowable spans. The maximum allowable spans for wood structural panel roof sheathing shall not exceed the values set forth in Table R503.2.1.1(1), or APA E30. R803.2.3 Installation. Wood structural panel used as roof sheathing shall be installed with joints staggered or not staggered in accordance with Table R602.3(1), or APA E30 for wood roof framing or with Table R804.3 for steel roof framing.

I am not seeing where it is required to use Fire-retardant-treated plywood, only vaguely instructing you on how it should be used if you choose to use it.

I think you're mis-reading the meaning of that sentence stating the use of the fire retardant plywood. It says:

"Wood structural panel roof sheathing exposed to the underside may be of interior type bonded with exterior glue, identified as Exposure 1. R803.2.1.2 Fire-retardant-treated plywood."

So first, there are fire retardant requirements for materials to prevent fire from spreading. Things like drywall thickness and type, so if there is a fire in a room or a wall it slows the spread of the fire to another room or into the attic space where it can run throughout the structure. So that being understood the "exposed to the underside" there, I understand to be in the context of open exposed sheathing to the living space. Normally you would have your interior drywall which would provide the thermal barrier. Since you aren't going to have that you have to make up for it somewhere, in this case fire retardant plywood. 

I could be wrong as I work in land development and not the building code aspect specifically. However I read municipal development codes daily and were I to read something like that, the interpretation would be intended only for the specific instance it is listed under (the exposed underside). Otherwise it would have stated it as a overall requirement with no clarifying placement/use statement.

OH DAH! THANK YOU! I cant believe I did not see the " may" in that sentence! I love this site, I tell you I do. 

OK next question. Josh, since your in WF's  I'm hoping you will jump in on this one. How hard is the building inspector to get along with  if your slowly getting a property with 2 houses on it fixed. BOTH roofs are complete rehabs in the add on section of each house. The main part on both houses definitely needs reshingled. Not sure yet if  new decking is needed. Have not climbed into the attics since I did not have my ladder and big flashlight with me when I looked. . The little house in back has one wall that is going to need to be rehabbed in one section. There is a add on that I'm thinking simply tear out and  put the wall back in straight. The kitchen floor is wavy, which seems odd since the rest of the floors are level.

I can do the work no problem. It will have to take advantage of the permit code that says you have to show work every six month as being done and not abandoning he work so the permit does not expire but that is doable, even on my budget. With that 6 month rule I could work on both at the same time IF I had to to keep county off my butt.

Originally posted by @BA R. :

http://publicecodes.cyberregs.com/icod/irc/2009/ic...

this is straight off the International code 2009 

It's always a good starting point to read a code book to get a good basic understanding of building code, BUT... in the front of every code book there is always somewhere a page that states that local building code supersedes the code book. This allows for locations that have different weather, different seismic activity, snow loads, etc... to adjust the code to fit to their local conditions.  This is referred to as local code adoption and smart contractors (or DIYers) quickly learn that the ultimate and final say in code is the local building dept, so a quick phone call to speak to an inspector is the fastest path to the final answer is to any question, you're getting the answer from the person who will most likely be the person who will eventually be at your property and having to sign off on the permit signature page.

EXCELLENT ADVICE!  I love this site!   THANK YOU ALL!!!!!!

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