Best Tool For DIY Project

16 Replies

The best tool for a DIY project isn't something you find in an aisle in Home Depot.  It's...YouTube! 

I come from a long line of contractors, so although it's not my job I am pretty comfortable with most DIY projects.  I was thinking about tackling something that I hadn't done before (tankless water heater) and went on YouTube and found a goldmine of how to videos.

If you've never sweated copper pipe, put in crown molding or rewired something and want to learn how, I highly recommend going on there. There's some great info on there for people wanting to learn how to do some projects.  I think it's also great even if you don't want to do it, because if you know what's involved in a repair (and what the building code requires) you can better supervise your workers if you hire out the repairs.  

@Peter Sanchez , I had never touched a piece of trim in my life. Spent three hours learning how to install crown molding mainly through YouTube videos and ended up installing it in my entire condo. Needless to say, I went through a lot of caulk as well, but the end result turned out pretty nice. Used YouTube when installing my hardwood floors and bathroom tile as well. I agree, YouTube is awesome for things like this. It just makes me wonder how people ever learned new stuff before the internet.

@Peter Sanchez

 Hahahah I thought this was going to be a dewalt vs bosch vs etc thread.  Yes I would have to agree youtube is the best tool to have.  I am not a contractor or handy man, but I know how to build and fix things.  I often explain to my sister how to fix something and then tell her to "youtube it" to see what I am talking about.  

You may be too young to remember them - but long ago they had these things called books.  You, when wanting or needing to learn something, either bought the books or borrowed the books or went to the library - and then read them.  In the books were words and pictures.  I know because I have a big wall of those antiques. <g>

Although I still do consult them from time to time - looking at them on their shelves does make me smile when I think of what it was like before the internet. <g>  

stephen
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'Originally posted by @Kyle B. :

@Peter Sanchez , I had never touched a piece of trim in my life. Spent three hours learning how to install crown molding mainly through YouTube videos and ended up installing it in my entire condo. Needless to say, I went through a lot of caulk as well, but the end result turned out pretty nice. Used YouTube when installing my hardwood floors and bathroom tile as well. I agree, 

YouTube is awesome for things like this. It just makes me wonder how people ever learned new stuff before the internet.

Ahhhh . . . .  just as I suspected. <g>

Isn't it a wonder that Amazon was able to ever get going at all - what with depending on selling them.  No wonder they had to branch out. <g>

stephen
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 Originally posted by @Kyle B. :

@Stephen S., books? I have no idea what you're talking about.

@Stephen S.

I was just remembering going to the library to research cinderblock walls the day before I went to do a kennel project for an in law over twenty years ago. Then thinking how easy it was to look up how to install the cargo rails on my wife's new Pilot last year using YouTube on my phone.

Technology is awesome! 

The information age has its upsides for sure.  I wish that freely available education materials on the web could someday lead to dramatically lower costs of higher education here in America.  I know big Ed. would never allow that to happen (and boy do they contribute a ton).  Sorry of topic, but I totally agree with you.  Its amazing what you can learn today online.  

I used youtube yesterday to test water heater thermostats and elements.  I've changed plenty of them but never remember how to test them.  Played it on my phone and tested along with the video.  I don't think I've ever looked on youtube for a repair idea and not found what I was looking for.  Great tool

@Stephen S. you just reminded me that I have a couple of reference books (i think they were put out by Black and Decker) on my shelf.  One is Plumbing and the other is Electrical (my achilles heel).  I'll tell my future grandkids about how in my day the internet was on paper and it'll sound like my grandpa talking about the radio being TV without a picture. 

Had some interior dash lights on our Honda Odyssey go out. The dealer quoted several hundred as "the dash would have to be removed." Youtube videos revealed just how easy it actually was, and I was able to do it in 30 minutes!

I agree with this post wholeheartedly! I was able to consult Dr. Youtube to get a breakdown on how to connect the 240v electrical wiring for an electric strove to an electrical panel in one of my rental units. 

Word of caution. Youtube can be as misleading as it is informative. I guess that is the double edged sword with open source information.

YouTube is a fantastic learning tool if you're cautious. I think of it like in the Matrix where they click a button on the computer and bam... you know Kung Fu. Anything you need is on there. On cars, there's so much content you can almost pinpoint your exact car for whatever you needed to know... although my vehicles are probably pretty common... 

Yes, YouTube has saved me hundreds upon hundreds of dollars on fixing things around the house and on the car. 

I don't do too many books for home improvement but I have found this to be a great book to keep handy.....

I have a couple of how to books (Plumbing, and Electric) that i've had a loooong time and were worth their weight in gold. Now i use YouTube for everything. 

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