Sub-Floor Question??? With picture

16 Replies

I want to put in some New ALLURE flooring in this kitchen. 

My Question is... am i better off putting it on top  of this Old 1"x 1" ceramic tile?  Or should I tear the tile off, but most likely destroy the chip board sub flooring that was added on top of the original laminate? 

Basically, do I cover over, or tear it ALL out?  thoughts? What will the Allure stick best too? 

Originally posted by @Joshua D. :

What will the Allure stick best too? 

 Allure won't  stick to anything: it's a floating floor. 

Looks like in the pic,  there are some missing tiles? What caused that? I'd be worried about going over it if more are goi g to pop out. 

There is a pdf on Allure plank tile installation. I only have experience over sheet vinyl,  but it says over ceramic can be done. 

Originally posted by @Joshua D. :

My Question is... am i better off putting it on top  of this Old 1"x 1" ceramic tile?  Or should I tear the tile off, but most likely destroy the chip board sub flooring that was added on top of the original laminate? 

Hi Joshua;

I don't know anything about Allure, but is there an advantage to leaving the 1"x1" tile down? If not, then I would go pick up one of these (below) and you can have that tile out in less than 15 minutes. Just hold the blade at an angle and you won't hurt the chip board underneath. It may take you a few more minutes to get the chip board completely smooth for the new Allure, but in my opinion, it's worth the little bit of time to get rid of the tile...

http://www.harborfreight.com/10-amp-heavy-duty-pro...

(Use a 20% off coupon from car and driver, road and track, men's journal , online coupon search, etc. and you can get another $37 off. )

DL

You don't need that $169 hammer if you want to spend about an hour or so taking it up yourself. Buy a steel chisel from Lowes or HD $15-$20. You'll spend some more time but it's worth the savings to me. If it's time you are worried about, buy 2 and get a helper. I've broken up and removed kitchen floors in about 90 minutes with a helper.

I would tear it all out.  Those missing tiles are going to need to be filled anyways with something to make the floor not have a dip there so why not just take it all out if you've got to do some work.  Good choice on using Allure by the way.

Medium rhplogo jpgDan Mackin, Red Hawk Properties | [email protected] | 720‑971‑7139 | http://www.redhawkteam.com/

Originally posted by @Peter T. :

You don't need that $169 hammer if you want to spend about an hour or so taking it up yourself. Buy a steel chisel from Lowes or HD $15-$20. You'll spend some more time but it's worth the savings to me. If it's time you are worried about, buy 2 and get a helper. I've broken up and removed kitchen floors in about 90 minutes with a helper.

Peter, you are out of your mind.  : )   

That electric hammer is only $136 if you use the coupon and will pay for itself over and over again in both time saved and muscle soreness. That electric hammer will pull up that tile faster than the helper can sweep it up. 

I doubt that this is the only tile floor that Joshua will be removing over the course of his RE career. But in addition to kitchen and bathroom tile (not only floors but also counter top tile and bath/shower wall tile), that hammer is great for separating cabinets from studs/drywall, countertops from cabinets, breaking up small sections of concrete sidewalks/driveways and on and on... heck, I even used it to quickly dig 300 holes when planting boxwood privets around the perimeter of my yard. 

You can get this bit set, which includes a three inch wide (3") bit ! 

http://www.harborfreight.com/12-in-sds-max-type-ma... $32 with a coupon.  : )

DL

I would pull the tile.  You want to make sure the subfloor is in good shape and you may not be able to tell with the tile there.  I always say, if you're doing a job do it right the first time.  You may even consider pulling up the tile with the subfloor, putting down new plywood, and then new flooring over that.  That way you should not have any squeaks or issues down the road.

NA Martin ) 

Which Allure is a stick-down floor? Even the type with the adhesive strips do not stick to the floor, but stick to themselves AFAIK.

NA MartinThat hammer looks great...and I love Harbor Freight.

Originally posted by @Scott Weaner :

Which Allure is a stick-down floor? Even the type with the adhesive strips do not stick to the floor, but stick to themselves AFAIK.

@DL MartinThat hammer looks great...and I love Harbor Freight.

Ah Scott.... So you, like me, are intoxicated by cheap tools made in China. Your a sick man and you probably need professional help. But you won't get it from me... 

Hand over that coupon and nobody gets hurt!!!

DL

Vinyl flooring of any kind settles into groves and crevices over time.  Take the tile up.  

@Joshua D. , I would pull up as much as I could.  I understand the desire to avoid unnecessary work/expense, because I'm a cheap s.o.b.  But when it comes to putting floor over old floor (or shingles over old shingles, or drywall over old walls, etc,) I'm a firm believer in take it down to the starting point and go from there.  If there's a problem with the subfloor but you never see the subfloor, you may waste a lot of time and money in putting down that new floor.

Bite the bullet and rip it up.

+1 for do it right and rip it down to the subfloor

I would be the one to have to learn the hard way cause I would put Allure over tile that small. I feel like they're small enough to where it wouldn't make that big of a difference. Not suggesting that you do it but I probably would. I just got finished putting some of this down last week.

If the sub floor is in good shape tile is the way to go b/c it is durable. If there is any kind of dip in the floor or slight in evenness the allure has some give to it.

Originally posted by @Joshua D. :

NA Martin   The Allure flooring I was referring to is a stick down laminate.  I realize that allure also makes their free floating stuff,  I should have been more specific. 

TrafficMaster Laminate flooring does not stick to the subfloor. Proper installation requires an underlayment product between the flooring and subfloor. Laminate may not be the best choice for a kitchen. My understanding is that Allure is a name used by TrafficMaster in the marketing of their LVT (luxury vinyl tile) and LVP (luxury vinyl plank) products. It is not used in conjunction with their laminate products, so it's confusing as to which product you are talking about.

In areas prone to liquid spills or moisture (such as kitchen, bathroom, laundry, basement) the TrafficMaster Allure Ultra (or something similar in another brand) will serve you better because it is 100% waterproof, clicks together, floats, and if one piece becomes damaged it would be relatively easy to replace. For any resilient vinyl flooring product, you need an even subfloor. Remove the old tile and examine the condition of the subfloor.

Also, layering new flooring over old can mess up the transitions between rooms, door swing/door thresholds, and amount of space available for sliding in under-the-counter appliances.

Marcia Maynard, Fischer Properties | Podcast Guest on Show #83

Pull it up... But for the love don't do what they guy said and go buy a $15 chisel from lowes. Use your buddy's demo hammer... I honestly can't believe someone said to use a freaking hammer and chisel on this to save $100...  My body still hurts from when I did that 7 years ago to a very small bathroom.  I still have nightmares about it...

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