YouTube Fixers?

10 Replies

Hi, I'm pretty handy with my hands and I enjoy working with my hands.  At the moment I don't have any technical skills but I am looking to get better.  

I am wondering if anyone uses youtube to guide them to do fixes on the multifamily as opposed to sent to property manager?

@Angel Rosado

Youtube is the best resource on earth for simple to mid level projects.

I just looked up:

Drilling through Acrylic

Cleaning Dryer Vents

Shed Roof options

There were hundreds of videos on each topic.  And then tens of videos debating the different types of tools one could use at each juncture of each project :)

YouTube and Google are my best friends. Use them all the time to figure out how to do projects on my own.  I do leave the plumbing and electrical to the professionals .

I taught myself how to clean carburetors, rebuild forks, replace stainless steel brake lines, do a valve job, etc. on my motorcycles all off of youtube and a service manual. If you want to learn it's all there. 

Ryan Dossey, Real Estate Agent in IN (#RB15001099)

You'll be fine. With YouTube's help I removed my own pesky spleen, then repaired a dishwasher.

@Kurt F. funny that was my next search..spleen removal :-)

@karen 

@Karen Bickford and @Aaron Montague I'm so glad that you guys are able to utilize youtube...As never owning a home, I fear I won't know how to deal with a lot of things but as you have clearly showed I can utilize youtube to find what I dont know.  I am a visual learned and things have to be shown for me to understand truly understand.

Originally posted by @Ryan Dossey :

I taught myself how to clean carburetors, rebuild forks, replace stainless steel brake lines, do a valve job, etc. on my motorcycles all off of youtube and a service manual. If you want to learn it's all there. 

 Same here.  YouTube was great for my bike!  I cut, welded, replaced, made my own seat and headlight.  put forks from a different bike on it.  cleaned carbs.  I pretty much turned one bike into another.  

@Angel Rosado

The flip side of all this is don't get in over your head.  If you look at something and it looks like it is going to be hard AND you'll have to learn several new techniques, you should probably call in a pro.  

Installing a sink in a greenhouse is a good place to start.  Installing a brand new water heater is not.  I'd never try a furnace on my own without years of sinks and water heaters.

The final note is always pull a permit and get a pro to sign off on work that needs to have their signature.  Insurance companies will pick that up instantly and not pay out on small or massive claims if you don't have your documents lined up correctly.  Even if you do all the work yourself, paying $300 to have the city and a licensed electrician sign off on your new addition's wiring is worth it.  Plus you'll learn a few things from the pro :)

The problem is that there will be both good and bad approaches given. I still remember when I was looking to deal with a hornet's nest - there were silly videos among those that were worthwhile. The challenge on the viewer is to distinguish ...

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