Renovation Order

16 Replies

Does anyone have any tips on renovation order?  I'm remodeling my basement.  It will soon be turned into a duplex to rent.  

The sheetrock and mudding is finished.  I have concrete floors I'm going to clean and stain rather than put hardwood or carpet down.

Do I paint the walls first or do I go ahead and stain the floors.  

What is the correct renovation order?

Thanks Bigger Pockets Family 

What room is the basement going to be.  Is it a storage room?  A playroom?  What are you going to do down there?

Are you sure you just  want to paint it?

Paint first and then do the floors.   Your floors should be one of the last things you do (at least for me).  There may be paint touch ups needed after staining but touch ups are always done on the final days anyway and there will always be some touch ups needed. 

@Derek T Thanks great tip.  @Barbara G.  The basement will be a two bedroom, one bath with utility room, full kitchen, dining room, living room with fireplace.  

It will be considered a duplex since it has it's own entrance. 

@Jason Garrison Will this be a "legal duplex"?  I doubt it, and it doesn't matter to me, but might to you somewhere down the line.  I'm a Florida boy now, but grew up in Center Point and my parents still live there.  Non carpeted basement floors would be way too cold a$$ for me in the winter, but I'm a cold weather wimp now.

@Wayne B. I've thought about that.  In fact my painter even mentioned the same thing to me when I told him what I was thinking of doing.  

The bathroom and kitchen will be tile.  I was just thinking of staining the rest of the basement floors, two bedrooms and living, dining room b/c it'd be cheaper and easier to maintain.  Wouldn't have to worry about spills etc...

Any ideas on best flooring base on the little info detailed above?

Paint the floors and stain the walls

I have used vinyl plank flooring in basement areas that are "finished" areas - but the glue down variety. Whatever you use, you have to be realistic and expect that the floor will get wet. 

@Steve Babiak I didn't think of that.  My parent's house is near the top of the hill, slopes to the rear, and the down spouts are buried to divert the water away from th house, never any water issues in the basement, but I guess it's a concern.  No basement experience down here.

Generally I work from the top down, so walls before floors in your case. There are some exceptions to that rule.

First off, have you check the RH of the concrete floor, basically the moisture content. You need to test in various areas of the basement but not near a furnace or dehumidifier as those areas will give you a false reading. Too high a RH and your staining project may not adhere properly. I've seen moisture blow epoxy off a floor. some type of vinyl floating floor such as a click lock would give you more warmth and a better look. Look for one that has an Aluminum Oxide scratch resistant finish or a ceramic bead one. It just seems that the painted/stained concrete look will not attract the renter you're looking for. Are you going for the Loft look?

And even though @J Scott has a good list there, there will be exceptions. For example, when getting granite counters for a kitchen, the granite installers want the stove in place before templates are made, so the stove being an appliance would have to jump up earlier in the list. And if you are trying to just have one delivery charge for appliances and having the stove delivered (and you are not picking up yourself), that could mean bringing other appliances earlier as well. 

Originally posted by @Steve Babiak :

And even though @J Scott has a good list there, there will be exceptions. For example, when getting granite counters for a kitchen, the granite installers want the stove in place before templates are made, so the stove being an appliance would have to jump up earlier in the list. And if you are trying to just have one delivery charge for appliances and having the stove delivered (and you are not picking up yourself), that could mean bringing other appliances earlier as well. 

Definitely agree there will be exceptions...but if you're using a standard stand-alone range (30"), I'd be surprised if a granite installer required it to be in place prior to templating.  I typically don't put the appliances in until the last day, and that's well after the granite is in.

Of course, if you have a built-in stove in an island, or something custom/non-standard, that's different.  But, in 95% of the houses I've done, that stove is just a standard 30" stand-alone...

Originally posted by @J Scott:
Originally posted by @Steve Babiak:

And even though @J Scott has a good list there, there will be exceptions. For example, when getting granite counters for a kitchen, the granite installers want the stove in place before templates are made, so the stove being an appliance would have to jump up earlier in the list. And if you are trying to just have one delivery charge for appliances and having the stove delivered (and you are not picking up yourself), that could mean bringing other appliances earlier as well. 

Definitely agree there will be exceptions...but if you're using a standard stand-alone range (30"), I'd be surprised if a granite installer required it to be in place prior to templating.  I typically don't put the appliances in until the last day, and that's well after the granite is in.

Of course, if you have a built-in stove in an island, or something custom/non-standard, that's different.  But, in 95% of the houses I've done, that stove is just a standard 30" stand-alone...

Well, the last one I did was a standard 30 inch, and they insisted on having it in place before templates. And I felt just like you, that it was not needed - just like a refrigerator. 

For Flooring that looks great, will hold up to water/dampness, check Allure line of vinyl flooring.  I just saw it down for the first time (had seen in HD but questioned how it would look down - too cheap maybe) but it looks great and holds up.

When you dye your concrete floors make sure you do not get cheap stuff at Home Depot. When I did mine I went to a concrete store and got professional materials. They also filled me in on how to clean the concrete (floor maintainer with black pad), spray the dye, roll on a coat of sealant and roll on a coat of finish. The floors turned out wonderfully. If it's in a basement not sure how well it will be vented. The concrete store materials will be a little more expensive but in the end it cost me about $1 per SQFT which isn't bad at all and the floor will last a really long time.

But I did find it easier to do the floors first and just cover them for painting. If anything dripped on the floors it was rather easy to clean up. Not sure if you have but I would wait to do the baseboards until the floor is done.

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