Help, advise needed...

25 Replies

Here is a video of the project I am working on for my aunt and uncle. I need guidance. I don't know what kind of materials or product I need to finish this wall, and because of flooding how much time I should give it to air it out. Please check out the video any help would be greatly appreciated. Thank you.

https://youtu.be/RBcwT3fcYfI

Hi April, 

That looks like a mess.  If it's flooded, you should probably tear it down to the studs at least 3 feet over the high water line.  If you just cover what you have and paint, you're leaving moisture inside the walls that will eventually rot or mold.  Any decent contractor should be able to handle that job, or search "tear out plaster walls" or something like that and do it yourself, since you seem to be a DIY kind of woman.  Once the plaster/drywall is down and you have the framing exposed, you can go back with drywall fairly inexpensively.

First a couple of questions, 

1, What is on the other side of the cement wall? is it another room? or is it dirt/outside?

2, What is the age of the house? Anything older then the late 70's may have lead paint to worry about. 

3, Are the other 3 walls in the room "standard" wood frame and drywall? 

If there are no lead paint concerns, and no water migrations issues from dirt etc. on the other side of the wall. I would suggest scraping and or taking a grinder with a wire brush to the wall to remove all the loose "plaster" type material. To match the other walls in the room, I would suggest skim coating the cement wall with drywall mud and then texturing. An alternative would be to attach furring strips and hang regular drywall over the wall then finish it as needed.

Thank you so much for both of your responses.

The flooding came from the bathroom on the other side of one of the walls. I don't think the water level came up that high except through the wall that it leaked through... All of the pain is incredibly loose on all walls and most of it came up no problem.

The wall in question is a side wall, which is directly connected to outside. All paint has been removed from all four walls. I don't know if that matters when it comes to lead being in the paint? Is there a transfer if the lead to the walls, or if the paint is gone the lead is also?

I do believe the other walls are standard.

April, 

 you can due as @Ryan Booth had suggested and use a wire brush or fur out the walls and hang drywall. you could use a chemical stripper to take the paint off, or not go through all that and take a putty knife, or a strong spackle knife that isn't flimsy, and scrape away any loose paint. then try to coat the wall with a layer of drywall mud. if there is loose paint that you missed the moisture from the drywall mud will raise it up. you just take that off and patch it with the mud. that may save you hours of work trying to remove the paint.

after you get everything exposed get you a moisture meter or rent one

check all areas of the work area and for kicks just check a parameter about 10 feet in circumference around the work area for signs of moisture

you can rent a dehumidifier from the rental yard and set that up as well let it run for 24-48 hours and check the area again

whatever you do don't get in a big hurry to get it covered up without it being completely dry

you may want to strip the paint on the block and concrete and seal it with dry lock before painting or sheet rocking

hope this helps a little

enjoy

You guys are great thank you so much for all of your help!
Wow, I really wish I would have posted this and talked to all of you before I started peeling the paint. I hand peeled all four walls with either my bare fingers or a spackle knife with blow dryer, then used a sander on any stubborn areas. I wish I would have known or thought about a paint stripper.

Okay so time to get ready to head over to Home Depot, and get a wire scraper. And get started on that.

Stanley, can I rent a moisture meter in the rental center at Home Depot; or will I need to go somewhere else?

I am going to start there and once I find out what level were at with the moisture level I will move forward with the next steps from there...

Thank you everyone for all of your help I really appreciate it...!!! : )

This is so easy to deal with, don't make it a bigger problem than it is. What you are calling cement is plaster lathe. That was how they built houses, actually not that long ago. If they actually plastered the wall, they would paint it, but usually, what I've discovered anyway, is they used a thin set mortar and then papered the wall.

Now if they papered the wall, then it got painted or they tried to remove the paper partially then painted it, that can make the issue more problematic, but not impossible. Get a tank sprayer, you know like for bugs. Fill it with warm water and some stuff you can get in the Walmart auto dept. called Purple Magic or another type of grease/oil remover. In a one gallon tank I usually use about a quarter cup of the grease remover. Then wet everything on the wall down. You may want to spread some plastic and tape on the floor so as not to damage it.

Get a book and sit down to read a page or two, then rewet the wall. Repeat as necessary. You could also score the paper with a bug that is made to perf the paper and allow water in behind it. As you get close to the right wetness the paper will start to peal on its own. Take a large two handed razor scraper and starting at the top scrape it down. Rewet as necessary and read a couple more pages. You won't have to worry about water damage on thin set mortar or plaster lathe.

Now if it is drywall, you have to perf the paper first, and perf it a lot, then wet it and use a special scraper to remove the paper so you won't damage the drywall too much.

Now if it is plaster lathe and thin set mortar with just paint you want to remove, get a drywall sander that attaches to a vacuum and sand it down using a heavy grit paper. You may need to scrape the loose paint as well. Because they may have used some lead in the paint, you should seal off the room and use a respirator of some sort and remove any clothing for cleaning before you track it into your home. I don't get to wired up about lead here, but you never can tell where you are at if it is a problem.

If the wall is drywall, don't bother removing the paint. It isn't worth it. If you are really uptight about the paint you can simply skim over it or put up 1/4" drywall over the older drywall and plaster lathe.

Now if you don't want to hang any new drywall and just want to fix the cracks or gouges you put in the wall removing the paper, just use drywall compound. You don't need anything else. You can tape over the crack just like drywall without any problem. I'd suggest skimming it some and either using a skip trowel or knockdown texture, as that will cover any imperfections.

This is my first time doing something like this, I had never done anything like this

before. I just wanted to say thank you to all of you, for all of your help and input. I would not have know what to do without all of you. 

April,

Congratulations, that came out great !  what did you end up using to take off the old paint ?  did you use regular drywall compound ? how many coats did it take ? any special paint you have to use ? can you share this for others that might read this post.

I peeled it either with my bare fingers, putty knife, putty knife and blow dryer (blow dryer helped a lot) and tough tough spots- a sander. I have no idea how many coats it took off but from what I can tell there was about 4 different colors of paint assuming each color had 2 coats.  For drywall mud, I used "Westpac" super light - light weight all purpose compound - joint compound. For sealing the drywall, I used Kilz2 latex sealant/Multi-surface stain blocker. I used BEHR interior semi-gloss enamal ultra pure white 3050 for ceiling, closets, and doors and trim (I still have to do the doors and trim.) I used Glidden interior paint and primer eggshell semi-mate pebble grey paint to finish the walls

I peeled it either with my bare fingers, putty knife, putty knife and blow dryer (blow dryer helped a lot) and tough tough spots- a sander. I have no idea how many coats it took off but from what I can tell there was about 4 different colors of paint assuming each color had 2 coats. For drywall mud, I used super light - light weight all purpose compound - joint compound. For sealing the drywall, I used a latex sealant/Multi-surface stain blocker. I used a interior semi-gloss enamal ultra pure white for ceiling, closets, and doors and trim (I still have to do the doors and trim.) I used a interior paint and primer eggshell semi-mate pebble grey paint to finish the walls

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