DIY Drywall Texture Question

22 Replies

https://drive.google.com/open?id=1OIBgwOJAkB4aiK2o...

The link goes to a handful of photos of my bathroom. My goal is to use apply texture using joint compound, then use a paint+primer to finish.

The question is, what do I need to do prior to applying texture? I know I'll have to use a scraper to clear/flatten things down, patch holes, sand those parts down..... that's about all that I know to do. Am I missing any prep steps?

@Jeff Lee

What kind of texture are you planning to add?

I hope it's already clear that you're going to have to remove the rest of the wallpaper and wash the wall downs first.

I would get a hopper gun air mix my mud blow it on the wall looks great I have work in Bossier city remolding in that area it is your best bet

Remove the wallpaper... I hope. Skim coat the torn paper area

I would not texture. It is a poor mans/lazy contractor approach to wall finish. It gets dirty over time and is near impossible to clean.

Remove paper, patch holes, properly finish walls flat and smooth then paint.

The wallpaper you see is the original. I removed the layer above it.

If I remove it (steaming), will I risk damaging the drywall?

@Jim K. - Knockdown. I steamed a majority of the wallpaper off. The remaining wallpaper wasn't coming off with my steamer. I'm looking into a solution to remove it.

@Colleen F. - Thanks!

@Thomas S. - What alternatives are there and/or what would you suggest?

You can skim coat the entire wall to get it smooth again.  You will still need to prep the wall where the paper came of with a skim coat of drywall mud over it.  I would not texture one room when the rest of the house I bet has no texture.  Smooth walls are easier to repair drywall holes later on.   You can skim coat the entire wall which is providing a "Level 5 Finish" on the wall.  A drywaller will know what your talking about.

@Jeff Lee

It's not up to me to make judgments of taste, so let's go with your knockdown texture plan.

You're going to have to get the rest of the wallpaper off. I don't know what kind of steamer you were using, but a steamer made to remove wallpaper, such as the Wagner 715 that Home Depot sells for $50 WILL get that off as you scrape with a small putty knife up to a 4-inch taping knife. I have thin putty knives as narrow as 3/4 inch for this kind of work. You should be able to get away with the standard 1.5 thin and flexible knives.

You may damage the wall a bit in the process, as you indicated. That's OK.

All the little bits and clinging adhesive also have to come off, through scraping or sanding.

Once you've got the walls clean, break out your large half-sheet sanding block and give the walls a once-over. You might also want to scrub the walls down with TSP solution and rinse it if there's still a lot of wallpaper residue clinging to it. You do this with a pressure sprayer, a sponge mop, and a bucket.

Then it will be time to address the damaged parts of the wall, where the drywall paper tore. You can use a gallon of oil-based primer (Kilz Original) and a 2-inch chip brush to spot prime each of those areas. There isn't going to be any real ventilation in the bathroom, so you should wear a paint respirator with organic vapor cartridges as you put this on.

Once you've got it spot primed, break out setting-type joint compound. You should use the stuff you mix with water. Since this is your first time, I suggest you get the 45-minute (EZ Sand) variety. You can use all purpose premixed for this, but you'll have to wait a lot of time for it to dry and reapply multiple times to get the results you want because it shrinks as it dries. Overfill each defomity just a bit. When it hardens (after 45 minutes), you should get a standard hand sanding block (where you cut the sheet into 4 long strips) and a piece of 1-inch thick foam cut to fit under it and wrap good-quality 100-grit sandpaper around that. Then you sand the repaired areas in a circular motion until you get them fush.

Then you fully prime the walls either oil-based primer or water-based primer. The idea is to fully encapsulate your wall repairs in primer.

This will get you to smooth walls that will accept whatever texture you want. This is what I would do, as well as others who have offered advice on this.

If you're determined to go through with the knockdown texture, you won't have to work quite as hard smoothing the walls, as imperfections will be hidden by the texturing.

I know this is titled DIY but.... having the phone number of a reasonably priced drywall finisher (taper) will come in handy and save you tons of time in the future. this is an art that is well worth the cost. If your still interested in learning how and DIY then follow steps above. FYI in the northeast (L.I. NY) texture would diminish resale value.

Did you score the wallpaper before steaming. There is a tool for this but basically it lets the steam/ or remover get behind the wallpaper.  Also if you get a scraper under the edge you can pull the vinyl off.  I have used more of a wash and peel method but most wallpaper I have removed was over plaster.

Some prefer smooth but texture will be your friend if you ever have to patch or touchup paint in the future.  Smooth drywall gives no forgiveness to dings/marks in the wall or light shining across wall, showing off every wave in your drywall.  

@Jeff Lee I am major DIY guy who has done most everything. I have patched countless holes and even done some repair similar to what you are facing. That being said, I would pay a guy $200 (at most) to make this look nice. It will be money well spent. Finish work on drywall and texturing takes experience. For the small amount of money you can pay an expert to do this, it is just not worth messing with yourself. 

After the texture is done, use a dedicated drywall primer and two coats of semi-gloss paint, which is better for wet areas than eggshell. Paint+primer should not be applied directly on bare sheet rock.

If you attempt this yourself, do not leave ANY wall paper. It will look like crap after it is painted. I speak from experience. Get all the wall paper off. 

Originally posted by @Joe Splitrock :

@Jeff Lee I am major DIY guy who has done most everything. I have patched countless holes and even done some repair similar to what you are facing. That being said, I would pay a guy $200 (at most) to make this look nice. It will be money well spent. Finish work on drywall and texturing takes experience. For the small amount of money you can pay an expert to do this, it is just not worth messing with yourself. 

After the texture is done, use a dedicated drywall primer and two coats of semi-gloss paint, which is better for wet areas than eggshell. Paint+primer should not be applied directly on bare sheet rock.

If you attempt this yourself, do not leave ANY wall paper. It will look like crap after it is painted. I speak from experience. Get all the wall paper off. 

I just finished removing all wallpaper. This is my plan, please tell me if I'm in the wrong anywhere:

1. Patch up holes using joint compound and repair patch.

2. Skim coat the whole room with a taping knife.

3. Texture using joint compound + roller.

3b. Knock it down.

4. Drywall primer (do I need to do this if there's joint compound on drywall?).

5. Paint. I plan on using paint/printer in one. (Yes/No?)

Am I missing anything? All expert opinions appreciated.

Use guardz primer first. It will seal and make the brown exposed damaged underlayer hard and waterproof. Then you can sand the nubs off. Touch up with guardz. Skim coat. Rolling an even texture with a 1/2 inch sheepskin roller cover isn’t as easy as it looks but if you roll and use a huge squeegee you can get a smooth finish. Still not that easy. Sand. Prime...you can use the rest of the guardz up here. Then paint.

Should I prime the whole room or just areas with damaged drywall?

@Jeff Lee

Paint + primer in one is either the first or the second-biggest lie in the home improvement industry. The other is "one-coat coverage."

You should prime the whole area.

Unless it is true plaster, I would 1/4” overlay drywall, 2 coat finish finish , sand ,  prime , Touch up, and paint. Especially, if it is a small room like a powder room.  

As others have said, get the rough areas as smooth as possible before proceeding. I've always primed the newly applied drywall compound with Kilz water-based primer, and it looks fine. I don't know why you'd want to bother with oil-based primer unless you were working with exterior metal or something special like that.

People debate whether to prime before or after texture or both. I've always primed before the texture and painted over the texture without additional primer, with good results.

Originally posted by @Jim K. :

@Jeff Lee

Paint + primer in one is either the first or the second-biggest lie in the home improvement industry. The other is "one-coat coverage."

You should prime the whole area.

 Exactly, paint+primer is a gimmick. Prime the whole area and I would do 2 coats of a quality paint. Good paint coverage will cover minor imperfections too. More importantly in a bathroom you want to seal the drywall well so that moisture can't get at it.

Originally posted by @Jeff Lee :

Should I prime the whole room or just areas with damaged drywall?

Prime everything you skim coat or texture.  Sounds like this will be everything if I read correctly.   The drywall compound will suck up the primer / paint so its worth the $15 for a gallon of primer. You will have to 2 coat it for sure whether its paint or primer and paint.  Primer will allow for better adhesion of the paint to the all. 

Most commercial painting is a 3 coat system.  Primer, Paint & Paint.

Remember one thing when you are doing this: any repairs that you do should have feather edges, meaning that if you run your hand over it with your eyes closed you can't tell where the wall stops and the repair begins, and if you look at it with a light on it to the side you can't tell where the wall stops and the repair begins. If you don't get this, the repair will be magnified as you add paint to it, even flat paint. If you're putting texture on it, it's not as crucial but bad ridges will still show. That is another reason to prime first, because you can see any repairs that aren't up to snuff and can fix them before putting a finish coat on top. 

There are really good wall skim coating videos on Youtube by Paul Peck.  He rolls it on then smooths it with a large taping knife.  The best texture in my opinion is knockdown.  I have also had skip trowel finish put on walls and it looks good too. It does take experience to make it look good though.  Once you get the texture finished make sure to paint it with a semigloss especially in a bathroom.  All my rentals are textured and painted the same color of semi-gloss.  Lasts a long time and can be cleaned easily.  

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