Pool in flip house - fix or demo/fill?

10 Replies

I’m flipping a house in New Jersey, built in 1983, 4 beds 2.5 baths, and it has a pool. The concrete pool hasn’t been used in years. Tile is peeling, walls have missing paint, deck around pool is uneven. Should I demolish it or repair it?

How popular is the pool there adding any home value?  In west coast most home owners filled the pool with dirt as local water district on and off for years to make water fill difficult and expensive.  

Most people will not want to bother with a pool. They add no value here.

I would fill the pool for a flip.  Most buyers do not want to deal with a pool which means they don't want to buy a house with one.  When you are flipping you want to cater to the masses and get as many buyers to like the house.  Nothing extreme.  Selling Vanilla is better than trying to sell mint chocolate mojito with lime.

Haha exactly "Selling Vanilla is better than trying to sell mint chocolate mojito with lime."

Originally posted by @Frank Wong :

I would fill the pool for a flip.  Most buyers do not want to deal with a pool which means they don't want to buy a house with one.  When you are flipping you want to cater to the masses and get as many buyers to like the house.  Nothing extreme.  Selling Vanilla is better than trying to sell mint chocolate mojito with lime.

Thanks everyone!  Seems unanimous.  Love the quote about better to "selling vanilla is better than trying to sell mint chocolate chip mojito with lime"  made me laugh out loud!

Leave the pool as is and sell the property with three options: 1. you will fill in pool before closing, 2. you will leave pool as is, 3. you will rehab pool prior to closing. Many buyers might ask you to just fill it in, but some might want it and either have you rehab it or leave it for them to do. Googlemap the neighborhood and see how many pools there are in that area, probably pretty common in your demographic area (4BR in Morris County). Sometimes I am surprised by how many houses have pools, I think pools are contagious, one household gets one then before you know it it's the norm in that neighborhood, especially if there are a lot of young families in the area. Sometimes we leave odd features intact if we can't figure out what to do with them, then ask the buyers if they want them or not. We almost tore down a small barn once and the people bought the house because of the barn!

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