Paint a brick house or not

17 Replies

I have a house built in the 50’s that is all red brick. I have seen other flippers paint the brick and I like it, but does that increase the sale price of the home, or does leaving it with the original brick bring in the same sale price?

I'm curious to hear the answer to this as well. My guess it wouldn't make that much of a difference. If done well, I prefer painted, but all in all I would guess that painted wouldn't increase the sale price that significantly. 

@Jennifer Williams although it is quite trendy now it is not recommended to paint exterior birck as it prohibits the brick from breathing during freeze and thaw cycles causing spalling and other damage.

You will also be causing a maintence free exterior needing to be painted on a regular basis.

I saw a real estate investor paint the outside of their building a popular shade of grew and trim on the building a creamy white.  It made the building stand out on a street that was all brick buildings and really pop!  I think it added a lot of curb appeal to the building and if it was going for sale against the other buildings I think it would have a better chance of selling faster for a better amount of money.  Grey does not sound like a popular color, but if you look up popular colors with renters it actually stands out or at least the right shade does to make the interior stand out against other apartments that are doing white or beige interiors.  Now the question is, would that be a good idea if the brick building was on a street that wasn't a street filled with brick buildings? Also, another thing to consider is that once you paint it, you have to keep on painting it to keep it looking good and that adds more cost.  A buyer may like the idea of a non-painted building as it is one less maintenance thing he or she has to take care of.  As I farm areas though, I know that building in Cleveland heights does tend to attract more renters.  So painting may help with turnover, one of our biggest costs.

Originally posted by @Sean M. :

I have a house built in the 50’s that is all red brick. I have seen other flippers paint the brick and I like it, but does that increase the sale price of the home, or does leaving it with the original brick bring in the same sale price?

 Market is competitive as all get up right now. Highly doubt painting it or not painting it will matter much. No real way to measure this honestly. Kitchens and baths sell homes. Are your kitchens and baths bangin?

Why take basically a zero maintenance exterior, and turn it into one the requires money to be spent on it for repainting every so often.

Even HardiBoard needs to be repainted from time to time (when it begins to chalk off). 

Brick just sits there and requires no paint.

It seems shortsighted to me, on both the sellers and buyers parts.

Just my 2 cents.

@Waylon Zook

Brick does not breathe through the face or mortar. If water gets behind the brick there should be weep holes at the bottom that let the water come out. In older homes this is usually a cotton rope.

If brick is spalling and popping it has nothing to do with paint, and everything to do with water getting behind it. Unless the paint blocks the weeps from draining.

@Dave E. you are correct to a point. The moisture i am concerned about is where it soaks into the brick but never makes it to the backside of the brick. If the paint is in good condition it should never soak into the brick but what happens when the paint peels or cracks and allows penetration into the brick not behind the brick ?

Just one link of many that a quick google search will bring up on the subject. https://www.houselogic.com/remodel/painting-lighting/paint-brick-house/

While kitchens and baths are no doubt important, curbside appeal has also made a huge differance on deals.  The inside if important but so is the outside.  I agree with the others too that the condition of the brick is important.  Curbside will make yours sell faster over others.

@Dave E. Just to be clear i am not advocating for painting brick.....if you need to change the color of a brick there are stain options available.

Some of what my years in the masonry trade have me is that brick and mortar need to breath and painting prohibits that.

Most brick is not meant to be painted. Left alone, brick is the ultimate, maintenance free siding material. It will last generations. Once painted, it needs to be repainted every 5-10 years. On top of that, brick is porous, which allows the property to "breathe". It's a really difficult surface to get paint to adhere to as well, especially in the mortar joints. If anything, use a white wash, but not paint. 

Originally posted by @Waylon Zook :

@Jennifer Williams although it is quite trendy now it is not recommended to paint exterior birck as it prohibits the brick from breathing during freeze and thaw cycles causing spalling and other damage.

You will also be causing a maintence free exterior needing to be painted on a regular basis.

 Interesting, thanks for sharing this!

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