Direct Mail Dismal Results

11 Replies

Hello BP community! I am seeking advice/feedback on my unsuccessful direct mail campaign. Please provide comments, feedback, etc on what may be the issue. Summary of campaign Targets: Recent NOD filings Purpose: Purchase below market due to distress Data: pulled from title company online account. I got 1900 NOD filings in Southern California from 9/1/17 - 11/1/17 across 83 cities. Mailers: Postcard style off yellow Mailer Message: essentially that I will purchase in 10 days with no broker fees. Also that this will help avoid a possible bankruptcy or foreclosure which stays on the record for 7-10 years. 1900 mailers were sent on 11/27/17. To date I have received 1 phone call. All thoughts are welcome. For those with extensive experience - how does seasonality affect responses (I.e I sent out right after thanksgiving) and during this time of year how long from mail date until responses start coming in? Thanks for the help

Thanks @Brie Schmidt ,

Hi Kyle,

There are a number of details in your method that I disagree with, and trying to explain them all would just take more time than I have to type. So, salient points...

I understand that you are holding out hope, but seasonality is not going to impact this kind of mailing overly much. Your responses will come when the mail hits. It's POSSIBLE not all of your mail has hit (see below)

  • I do not like Postcards. They are not effective. Most people, even those in distress, throw them in the trash without a second thought.
  • If your postcards were not first class, they can take up to 30 days to be delivered
  • I do not like the NOD list (more on that below)
  • Your messaging was very specific. If the only thing you can do to "help" them is buy the house, then mentioning their financial situation does not work to your advantage. If you have a unique selling proposition, if you can offer help of some other kind, it can be worth mentioning.

The way the rules work in TEXAS gives us no time to do an effective marketing campaign for pre foreclosure. The folks who are having the most success with these are door knocking, and even at that, you have to be careful.

Seems like a no brainer, right? "Sell me your house for what you owe and avoid losing your credit". Sadly, most of these who find themselves in such a predicament (remember, you do not get on a NOD list by having a stellar reputation as a decision maker :-) )....most who find themselves there fall into 2 general camps:

  • Those who are paranoid, and think EVERYONE knows their business, and believes anyone seeking them out to be a creditor. They HIDE. Hard to find. Do not answer the phone...Mentioning their predicament intensifies this reaction.
  • And those who have managed to emotionally divorce themselves from the home...."oh.....I'm just going to let the bank have it" They have made up their minds, and have a small measure of peace. They do not want any HOPE dangled in their face.

That's been my experience.

Having said that, congratulations for getting out there and doing SOMETHING. Marketing is largely about trial and error, and one thing I love about @Brie Schmidt is that she is smart enough to bennefit from other's mistakes by leveraging their knowledge and experience on the front side of a campaign.

Hope that helps! 

Hi guys,

From what I've HEARD is that direct mail works best when you mail to the same people multiple times(I HEAR 8 is optimal). I have never done a campaign myself. 

Also thank you Jerry for the help on why NOD deals with difficult sellers. I was already against mailing to this list but what makes me not want to deal with them as a beginner is if you fail to perform and close after getting under contract and then they foreclose you may be under some legal trouble.

People who have NOD's filed get so much mail in California it may boggle your mind. Many don't check their mail. Your proposition would need to stand out. Also, many of them don't want to sell as their first option so if that's your only value add people likely won't reach out. You need to help educate them towards their goals. Many people want to keep and will try, but when they end up not being able to, they will sell.

Sorry @Kyle Weckesser , I forgot to @mention you in my earlier reply.

@Cody Evans , I'm not exactly sure where you are coming from....Any time you fail to perform...any time you default on a contract, you can find yourself in some trouble. Please do not sign any Real Estate contracts without understanding exactly what you are obligating yourself to. Have you considered getting licensed?

I was saying do not sign a contract ,especially with a preforeclosure where the government is involved. Failing to perform is more than just losing the deal because you can be liable plus it is bad business.

Originally posted by @Jerry Puckett :

Thanks @Brie Schmidt ,

Hi Kyle,

There are a number of details in your method that I disagree with, and trying to explain them all would just take more time than I have to type. So, salient points...

I understand that you are holding out hope, but seasonality is not going to impact this kind of mailing overly much. Your responses will come when the mail hits. It's POSSIBLE not all of your mail has hit (see below)

  • I do not like Postcards. They are not effective. Most people, even those in distress, throw them in the trash without a second thought.
  • If your postcards were not first class, they can take up to 30 days to be delivered
  • I do not like the NOD list (more on that below)
  • Your messaging was very specific. If the only thing you can do to "help" them is buy the house, then mentioning their financial situation does not work to your advantage. If you have a unique selling proposition, if you can offer help of some other kind, it can be worth mentioning.

The way the rules work in TEXAS gives us no time to do an effective marketing campaign for pre foreclosure. The folks who are having the most success with these are door knocking, and even at that, you have to be careful.

Seems like a no brainer, right? "Sell me your house for what you owe and avoid losing your credit". Sadly, most of these who find themselves in such a predicament (remember, you do not get on a NOD list by having a stellar reputation as a decision maker :-) )....most who find themselves there fall into 2 general camps:

  • Those who are paranoid, and think EVERYONE knows their business, and believes anyone seeking them out to be a creditor. They HIDE. Hard to find. Do not answer the phone...Mentioning their predicament intensifies this reaction.
  • And those who have managed to emotionally divorce themselves from the home...."oh.....I'm just going to let the bank have it" They have made up their minds, and have a small measure of peace. They do not want any HOPE dangled in their face.

That's been my experience.

Having said that, congratulations for getting out there and doing SOMETHING. Marketing is largely about trial and error, and one thing I love about @Brie Schmidt is that she is smart enough to bennefit from other's mistakes by leveraging their knowledge and experience on the front side of a campaign.

Hope that helps! 

100% great advice here. Hit all the major downfalls of mailing to forcloser. I would say 98% of people in a forcloser situation think either they are going to get bailed out or just going to live rent free till they are kicked out. With that said I do mail a generic letter to 30,60,90's and get deals. 

I will just say I did my own direct mail campaign a few years ago and then had Jerry do one for me 6 months later.  The results were incredibly different.  I think I got 3 calls from the first and I couldn't keep up with the calls on the second. 

Thanks @Jerry Puckett

All good commentary. 

Have you had any success with NOD recipients with possibly different messaging/approach? 


My thought process was that you are absolutely correct and 98% are going to be either underwater or irrational sellers. My hope is that 2% may be rational, have equity in the house, but unfortunately have extenuating circumstances that require a fast disposition. Capturing 20% of the 2% would seem realistic under such a scenario. 



Originally posted by @Kyle Weckesser :

@Brie Schmidt

Sounds like Jerry really helped. What changes would you attribute to the success??

 I sent a fancy postcard to all properties in a specific area.  I honestly don't know what @Jerry Puckett did as far as the list criteria, but I know it was a "handwritten" letter

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