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House Hacking

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Ayomikun Oyeleye
  • Investor
  • Louisville, KY
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Investing in Real Estate as an Employee vs. Self-employed in Louisville, KY

Ayomikun Oyeleye
  • Investor
  • Louisville, KY
Posted Mar 2 2024, 11:23

Hell everyone,

I’m new to the Bigger Pockets platform and real estate investing in general, and I’ve learned so much over the past few days than I’ve ever learned in years about the real-estate asset class. I’m currently a 21-year-old senior at the University of Louisville, and I’ll be graduating this May with my degree in neuroscience debt-free.

I'm currently on the look out for a property that I can house-hack. I'll love to househack a multi family property (like a duplex) using the FHA loan program. Although I've lived in Louisville for years, I'm not sure what to look out for or what neighborhoods will be good for househacking. The long-term goal is to househack every year or two while also buying investment properties for MTR or for renting long-term. If you're based in Louisville and have a good knowledge of the city, I'll love to connect!

I main question is about scaling in real estate as a business owner vs employee. I have a few job opportunities lined up after graduating college, but I also just started a business about 6 months ago. I’m only running the business part time (15 to 20 hrs a week) and it’s already bringing in about 3k a month profit (with everything subtracted from revenue besides taxes). So, I know once I can focus on it full-time, I’ll be able to double my income from the business. I have 5 figures in savings, and the business can definitely sustain me after college. From talking to lenders, I need to accept at least one job offer and have an actual job after college in order to qualify for a loan since I don’t have two years of tax return from my business. My past 2 years of college transcript qualifies as 2 years of tax return, but having a job after college is crucial. My credit score is 720+ and a down payment for an average property in Louisville, KY shouldn’t be a problem. 

I love being a business owner, and I feel like building businesses and creating job opportunities through that is my true calling (I’m very passionate about social entrepreneurship). Working a job takes away from that, and I don’t see myself working a full time job long-term. I have no kids or main responsibilities. How many years would you suggest working a job after college to make the process of getting a househacking property every year easier? For the business owners who are real estate investors in the group, how are you able to scale your investment portfolio and qualify for appropriate loans without having a job (even though your business makes good money)? A lender also once told me that if you had a business, you can’t write off too much because that may also affect your ability to qualify for a loan. How do you strike a balance so you write off just enough to qualify for more loans as you buy more investment properties down the road? What type of loans are appropriate for business owners and self-employed individuals to scale past 10+ properties? 

Ps: I know I’ll need to work a job since I haven’t had a business for a long enough time (I apparently need two years tax return from my business), but I’m just thinking long-term based on my goals for the future. 

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Alecia Loveless
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#4 BRRRR - Buy, Rehab, Rent, Refinance, Repeat Contributor
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Alecia Loveless
Pro Member
#4 BRRRR - Buy, Rehab, Rent, Refinance, Repeat Contributor
Replied Mar 2 2024, 19:52

@Ayomikun Oyeleye The W-2 job will just make it so much easier to get conventional loans. These loans typically have lower interest rates than other types of financing which is still saying something currently given that you can get a 6.5-7% conventional loan vs. an 9.5-14% loan using a DSCR or HML. The latter varies widely based on your level of experience and your relationship with the lender in the case of the HML.

I had held my job for about 10 years in the same industry before getting into real estate investing. I didn’t make that much, never more than $45,000 from my W-2 but I was able to utilize a portion of the income from the rental properties I was buying to help qualify for each mortgage.

It’s my personal opinion, and not legal or financial advice, that if I were you I’d plan to start out with one or two conventional loans where if you’re house hacking you can get the low down payments. Then once you have more experience if you want and your business has taken off and you have the 2 years of tax returns to then focus on the alternative forms of financing.

I stayed with my W-2 for 4.5 years after I started investing in real estate. However I had spent my first 15 years after college working for myself so I was tired of working for other people after the second 15 years.

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Ayomikun Oyeleye
  • Investor
  • Louisville, KY
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3
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Ayomikun Oyeleye
  • Investor
  • Louisville, KY
Replied Mar 2 2024, 20:40

Thank you so much for your words of wisdom! I’ll definitely stick with a w2 job at least to buy my first few house hacks as you suggested. Once the business starts doing better and I have 2 years of tax return from the business, do I have to use alternative forms of financing (like a dscr loan) or can I still qualify for a conventional loans with lower interest since I now have 2 years of tax return from the business (given that I didn’t write off too much from the business income)?

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