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Inspection report said plumbing system would not hold 40 psi?

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Kevin N.

Real Estate Investor from raleigh, North Carolina

Mar 16 '11, 04:53 AM


I am under contract with the HUD house. In the HUD inspection report it said plumbing system and sewer system are tested with air compressor and would not hold 40 psi. I do online search they said normal range for household water pressure is range 40-80 psi. Do you think is it a big issue or not?



Steve Babiak

Real Estate Investor from Audubon, Pennsylvania

Mar 16 '11, 05:19 AM
3 votes


In my area, when I see in a HUD report that it doesn't hold pressure, I usually see that there is NO COPPER to pressurize once in the house!

Expect to replace some pipes and/or fixtures, since you will definitely want to be able to hold at least that much pressure.



Steve Babiak, Redeeming Properties, LLC
Telephone: 6109082183
...


Kevin N.

Real Estate Investor from raleigh, North Carolina

Mar 16 '11, 09:25 AM


Steve,
Thanks for your reply. Do you know if the inspector could have a way to locate the things that need to be replaced ?
Kevin



J Scott Verified Moderator Donor

Real Estate Investor from Ellicott City, Maryland

Mar 16 '11, 09:34 AM


Originally posted by Kevin Nguyen:
Steve,
Thanks for your reply. Do you know if the inspector could have a way to locate the things that need to be replaced ?
Kevin

This is a better question for a qualified contractor (not the inspector)...



Medium_lishproplogoJ Scott, Lish Properties, LLC
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Ralph S.

Real Estate Investor from Sacramento, California

Mar 16 '11, 09:36 AM


I think 40 psi is the minimum code for waste lines, not supply. Commonly referred to as schedule 40, you'll find Sch 40 stamped on the white PVC waste lines.
Never heard of that test as part of an inspection, however.



Steve Babiak

Real Estate Investor from Audubon, Pennsylvania

Mar 16 '11, 09:38 AM


A good plumbing contractor will be able to do an air pressure check, and then go around and identify what likely needs replacement. You would want to conduct as much of the replacement as possible without the water being turned on, and do air pressure testing until the system holds pressure. Don't put any water into the pipes until it holds air pressure.



Steve Babiak, Redeeming Properties, LLC
Telephone: 6109082183
...


Steve Babiak

Real Estate Investor from Audubon, Pennsylvania

Mar 16 '11, 09:39 AM
1 vote


Originally posted by Ralph S.:
...
Never heard of that test as part of an inspection, however.

When the water isn't turned on in REO, you can use air pressure to see if pipes hold - no need of having to re-winterize that way.



Steve Babiak, Redeeming Properties, LLC
Telephone: 6109082183
...


Mitch Kronowit Donor

SFR Investor from Orange County, California

Mar 16 '11, 12:32 PM


Originally posted by Steve Babiak:
When the water isn't turned on in REO, you can use air pressure to see if pipes hold - no need of having to re-winterize that way.

That sounds like a great tip, but that doesn't help with evaluating the drain-waste-vent system, correct?



Steve Babiak

Real Estate Investor from Audubon, Pennsylvania

Mar 17 '11, 12:47 AM


Originally posted by Mitch Kronowit:
Originally posted by Steve Babiak:
When the water isn't turned on in REO, you can use air pressure to see if pipes hold - no need of having to re-winterize that way.

That sounds like a great tip, but that doesn't help with evaluating the drain-waste-vent system, correct?

Not true. See links here:

http://www.ehow.com/how_5454749_pressure-test-plumbing.html

http://www.ehow.com/info_7927159_safety-pressure-testing-plumbing-drains.html

http://plumbinghelp.ca/dwv_testing.php

That last link offers other alternatives as well. It's from Canada, where things are colder, so they probably have this need on an even greater basis.



Steve Babiak, Redeeming Properties, LLC
Telephone: 6109082183
...


Mitch Kronowit Donor

SFR Investor from Orange County, California

Mar 17 '11, 03:33 AM


Originally posted by Steve Babiak:
Not true. See links here:

http://www.ehow.com/how_5454749_pressure-test-plumbing.html

Thanks Steve. From what I can see, all these tests check the integrity of the system from a leak standpoint, but the one thing they do NOT check is the primary function of the DWV system, i.e., does it drain??? To test that, you actually have to run water for several minutes down the drains and make sure it doesn't back up, indicating a blockage (tree roots, pipe collapse, foreign objects, bad vent, etc.). I don't see how pressure testing can reveal a problem there since it requires the introduction of several intentional blockages to make the system airtight! :mrgreen:

If the home is "winterized", I don't see a way around undoing the supply side other than pouring several 5 gallon buckets of water down the drain and see if they drain properly. And since the water is shut off in a winterized house, the water will have to be brought in from somewhere else (doesn't sound fun).

As I stated earlier, we had to wait for the listing agent to get authorization from the asset manager to de-winterize the last house we bought so we could perform our inspection. The broker in charge actually wanted us to "waive" the plumbing inspection!!! I never worked with so many morons on a home purchase before, but that's another subject.

I wished there had been another way to test the plumbing, hence my interest in pressure testing, but the fact is you WANT the DWV system to have a leak, ONE really BIG one, into the sewer system! :wink:



Kevin N.

Real Estate Investor from raleigh, North Carolina

May 10 '11, 11:54 AM
2 votes


Just want to provide some feedback on my story...

Finally it turned out to be some crack in one of the water supply pipes inside the second floor. The home inspector could not find the problem and we closed the house. After closing, we could not get much water from the second floor faucets, then the plumber crank up the water supply (by adjusting some valve outside of the house ?) then we have water in the second floor. After that the plumber left and so did we. Fortunately I came back to the house around 8pm the same day, just to find out water dropping from living room's ceiling.
Long story short, the plumber has to cut out some ceiling on the first floor and some wall on the second floor. He charge me $100 for part and labor and I have to fix the drywall. Not that bad.
Kevin



Don Hines

Real Estate Investor from Little Rock, Arkansas

May 12 '11, 06:50 AM
1 vote


Originally posted by Steve Babiak:
In my area, when I see in a HUD report that it doesn't hold pressure, I usually see that there is NO COPPER to pressurize once in the house!

Funny, sad, and true. I know of a Church that lost the AC compressor to theives. I guess the crackheads don't fear the Devil.
Don



Account Closed

May 12 '11, 02:47 PM
2 votes


First off, from much experience i can tell you that PCR report from hud is about worthless. If anything, it just helps point out problems. If they say it works, don't believe it. I have a PCR saying the ac works fine with HUD's appraisal after receiving a contract showing the AC in pieces from thieves.

As for the PSI test, any opening in the water lines cause it to lose pressure (common sense). so any bad faucet, toilet, crack in a pipe or bad seal would cause this to fail. Obviously a concern in most cases but not something that keeps me up at night.

What I do find very odd is hud is willing to sell a house with a sinkhole, chinese drywall or i'm sure other yummy problems without disclosing them even after they are told in writing about the problem.



Don Hines

Real Estate Investor from Little Rock, Arkansas

May 12 '11, 10:28 PM


Originally posted by Aaron Churnick:
First off, from much experience i can tell you that PCR report from hud is about worthless. If anything, it just helps point out problems. If they say it works, don't believe it. I have a PCR saying the ac works fine with HUD's appraisal after receiving a contract showing the AC in pieces from thieves.

As for the PSI test, any opening in the water lines cause it to lose pressure (common sense). so any bad faucet, toilet, crack in a pipe or bad seal would cause this to fail. Obviously a concern in most cases but not something that keeps me up at night.

What I do find very odd is hud is willing to sell a house with a sinkhole, chinese drywall or i'm sure other yummy problems without disclosing them even after they are told in writing about the problem.

Sell a house under ADDI which is a HUD program and see how the inspectors act. The doublw standard is incredible.
Don



Jeffrey K.

Real Estate Investor from Milwaukee, Wisconsin

May 12 '11, 10:41 PM


I think when you pressure test a house you take the angle stops off and cap all of the lines. When we test waste we cap everything. We just use water to test water pipe.



Robert Steele

Real Estate Investor from Lucas, Texas

May 13 '11, 02:48 AM


Originally posted by Aaron Churnick:
First off, from much experience i can tell you that PCR report from hud is about worthless. If anything, it just helps point out problems. If they say it works, don't believe it. I have a PCR saying the ac works fine with HUD's appraisal after receiving a contract showing the AC in pieces from thieves.

As for the PSI test, any opening in the water lines cause it to lose pressure (common sense). so any bad faucet, toilet, crack in a pipe or bad seal would cause this to fail. Obviously a concern in most cases but not something that keeps me up at night.

What I do find very odd is hud is willing to sell a house with a sinkhole, chinese drywall or i'm sure other yummy problems without disclosing them even after they are told in writing about the problem.

Agreed. The last HUD I picked up said the same thing on their inspection report. My inspector could not find anything wrong because there was nothing wrong with the plumbing. The house has been rented out now for 3 years with no issues.



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