Are buyer requests overboard and a little absurd??

27 Replies

This will be my first home sale. I listed this beach home 2 bed 2 bath with a loft one block from main entertainment strip in Long Beach Washington for 225k buyer offers 205k I came back at 215k in hopes of a 210k counter but they took it at 215k. Even better with earnest at around 2k. Now they are asking I replace the roof some wiring in the attic they want me to replace the entire door frame and door on the front door mind you the one now is not in bad shape at all. And the other thing is the want me to purchase a warranty on the appliances that are very old as it is I feel like this has gotten a little ridiculous with the requests. Am I right in thinking so and if so how should I address the situation or any strategies I can implement such terms or price or whatever. Thank you very much for your time.

Does not sound like reasonable requests to me.  A roofs condition is easily visually available to all the parties involved. Nothing should have been a surprise about it. Sounds like the buyers agent may be inexperienced if they didnt point out the condition of the roof to their clients before making an offer.

@Phillip Garcia Yes, that sounds over the top. You aren’t forced into agreeing to anything. Just curious, did you receive any similar offers on the house? Because an offer for $5k lower would end up being much better than working with these buyers.

Hey @Phillip Garcia , welcome to BiggerPockets!

You've fallen victim to a Nibbler [see more about "the nibble" at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...]! And yes, caving to their demands only increases the chances they'll keep nibbling away, because you're showing them it works.

One counter-tactic to the Nibble is Quid-Pro-Quo: Extract a concession, no matter how small, for every concession requested. "I'll give you a warranty, but only if we move closing up a week."

However, the best approach would be to give yourself options by continuing to solicit (backup) offers from other buyers. If you knew you could say "no" to the Nibbler, and they knew someone else was waiting in the wings ready to step in, you wouldn't be so vulnerable to their gambit.

Differentiate between normal wear for components still serving well versus material defects.  An old roof without leaks is a fully functional roof.  That is not a defect.  You could agree with the buyer to put a new roof on, but that wasn't what you were originally selling - price accordingly.

I wouldn't agree to fix anything that isn't a defect.  A leaky roof would be a defect that you could negotiate with your buyer.  For example, you could agree to replace the roof and buyer pays for half.  Alternatively, instead of asking for more from the buyer, you could limit your spend to the new roof and state you are fixing nothing else if there are other issues.

Home inspections have become merely the point at which the negotiations really begin. Buyers have the right to know what they are buying so they can make an informed decision. I am afraid though this process is being abused by buyers to take a property off the market and after the buying process has moved down the road maybe two weeks, they ask for concessions for items found in the inspection that were obvious even to the layman. At this point the seller is at a significant disadvantage and both agents are pushing hard for a closing.

If it were me, I'd just offer to lower the price to what you were willing to accept in the first place and tell them take it or leave it. We were given a long list of "must do" repairs on a VA property once and I just told the realtor to bring us another buyer as we weren't going to do those things. Suddenly the list got much shorter...

Originally posted by @Mitch Messer :

Hey @Phillip Garcia , welcome to BiggerPockets!

You've fallen victim to a Nibbler [see more about "the nibble" at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...]! And yes, caving to their demands only increases the chances they'll keep nibbling away, because you're showing them it works.

One counter-tactic to the Nibble is Quid-Pro-Quo: Extract a concession, no matter how small, for every concession requested. "I'll give you a warranty, but only if we move closing up a week."

However, the best approach would be to give yourself options by continuing to solicit (backup) offers from other buyers. If you knew you could say "no" to the Nibbler, and they knew someone else was waiting in the wings ready to step in, you wouldn't be so vulnerable to their gambit.

 Lol nibbler love it  

Assuming this request came in during the inspection contingency period, it is typical for buyers to attempt to re trade the property. It is just part of the negotiation as it does not end with the offer.

In your seller response to buyers request for repairs, list each item and the individual response associated. As to the roof, simply say no, as to the other requests, as another poster pointed out, give some but take some. If the repairs to the front door are easy and cheap, say yes to that as you have an extra $5k to play with per your post, and for the warranty, that is typically something a buyer requests from a seller in their offer, so I would either say no as they did not request it or perhaps give in but ask for something in return like the immediate release of contingencies, quicker closing, or perhaps ask them to pay for half of it. Bottom line, it’s all a negation. You can also state that you have other interested buyers so if they are going to be difficult, you have the option to m Be on to the other buyers (the buyer doesn't need to know if you have other written offers or not and you don’t have to disclose that at this point). It is simply a negotiating tactic on your part.

Be very weary of anything that they are asking that costs more than say $1000, especially if they have a financing contingency.  

If they do not purchase the house, you are still stuck with the bill, and the next buyer may not care about the item, and it certainly will not add full cost value to the house.  Also, buyers that do this will do it again at the walk through.

I generally ask that they escrow the cost of any major repairs with an increase in their earnest money deposit and that if they fail to purchase the house, for any reason, including financing, that they forfeit the cost I made to repairs at their request in an addendum to the contract.  And if they do buy the house, that extra money is credited towards their down payment or refunded.  Note, this is not allowed with all lending processes.

If they want you to replace the roof and you are willing to pay 50% (which is what you said in an earlier post), tell them to give you half the money and you will make sure it is done before they move in.  This way you have some control over it.  Otherwise, hopefully you set a max dollar amount and not just '50%'.

Anything that is clearly visible at the time of viewing should have been factored into the offer price.

Originally posted by @Theresa Harris :

If they want you to replace the roof and you are willing to pay 50% (which is what you said in an earlier post), tell them to give you half the money and you will make sure it is done before they move in.  This way you have some control over it.  Otherwise, hopefully you set a max dollar amount and not just '50%'.

Anything that is clearly visible at the time of viewing should have been factored into the offer price.

In a prefect world, yes, but in the real world, the truth is, buyers like to re trade the price and so long as this was done inside their “inspection contingency”, regardless if it was obvious or not at time of offer, they have the legal right to negotiate it. This is just a simple fact of this business and as the seller, there are many ways to protect yourself from this and many more ways to counter the request. It’s all a negotiation which is what makes this biz so much fun!

Happy investing!

I have never heard of asking for a warranty for existing old appliances, that is just crazy to me. I would decline it all, offer $2k in credit as closing towards the roof. It really depends on how much you want to sell it right now though 

American Home Shield offers appliance insurance. You can call them get a quote for 12 months and offer that. I KNOW it will be less than the 5k. Perhaps offer a discount of 2k, sold as is with a 12 month warranty on appliances. 

Originally posted by @Gaspare U. :

American Home Shield offers appliance insurance. You can call them get a quote for 12 months and offer that. I KNOW it will be less than the 5k. Perhaps offer a discount of 2k, sold as is with a 12 month warranty on appliances. 

AHS is one of many home warranty companies that offer warranties on homes including old appliances, some of which cover additional items like pool equipment, etc for an annual fee which is typically $400-$700 for an1 year warranty. The cost can go up when the value of the property goes up as well.

Originally posted by @Russell Brazil :

Does not sound like reasonable requests to me.  A roofs condition is easily visually available to all the parties involved. Nothing should have been a surprise about it. Sounds like the buyers agent may be inexperienced if they didnt point out the condition of the roof to their clients before making an offer.

Russ,  Oregon Washington coast houses get the living you know what beat out of them.. winter storms with 100 plus mph wind sideways rains cold .. ugh.. those houses take tons of maintenance to be in decent shape. Long beach is probably the least expensive actual ocean front in the US by the way. 

Originally posted by @Jay Hinrichs :
Originally posted by @Russell Brazil:

Does not sound like reasonable requests to me.  A roofs condition is easily visually available to all the parties involved. Nothing should have been a surprise about it. Sounds like the buyers agent may be inexperienced if they didnt point out the condition of the roof to their clients before making an offer.

Russ,  Oregon Washington coast houses get the living you know what beat out of them.. winter storms with 100 plus mph wind sideways rains cold .. ugh.. those houses take tons of maintenance to be in decent shape. Long beach is probably the least expensive actual ocean front in the US by the way. 

Lol, that is true Jay, but most of the “ocean front” in Long Beach is covered with shipping yards, not the ideal beach city location for living which is why it is the cheapest. (Not all areas of course) 

Originally posted by @Will Barnard :
Originally posted by @Jay Hinrichs:
Originally posted by @Russell Brazil:

Does not sound like reasonable requests to me.  A roofs condition is easily visually available to all the parties involved. Nothing should have been a surprise about it. Sounds like the buyers agent may be inexperienced if they didnt point out the condition of the roof to their clients before making an offer.

Russ,  Oregon Washington coast houses get the living you know what beat out of them.. winter storms with 100 plus mph wind sideways rains cold .. ugh.. those houses take tons of maintenance to be in decent shape. Long beach is probably the least expensive actual ocean front in the US by the way. 

Lol, that is true Jay, but most of the “ocean front” in Long Beach is covered with shipping yards, not the ideal beach city location for living which is why it is the cheapest. (Not all areas of course) 

LOOOOOOONG Beach Washington is far different than Long Beach La la land  that's for sure..