60 minutes homeless crisis ideas for Seattle

74 Replies

@Greg M.

I agree with Greg M.’s post and argument 99%. So I won’t repeat what he already contributed.

However, Greg, your extremely accurate and very eloquent argument fell apart at the very last statement of “cracking heads”. Maybe I misunderstood the slang.

If you intended “cracking heads” as enforcing existing laws then yes, I agree. If you intended it as violence or something else then I certainly disagree.

Hope to see your reply,

Ryan

Originally posted by @Benjamin Tighe :

This is one of my favorite subjects. I come from a family filled with addiction. My brother was a homeless gang member in Portland before being deported to Mexico. I damn near lost everything I worked for in the 08 recession, to the point where I was running a chainsaw on a forestry crew while my pregnant wife waited for foreclosure notices to show up on our door.

While desperately trying to dig ourselves out of the hole WE DUG OURSELVES INTO, my brother and mom would constantly reach out for financial help. Being the ignorant person I was, I always found a way to give something, no matter how dire my own situation was. Years later I learned that damn near all the money I sent to "help those in need" was spent on methamphetamine. My brother explained that even though he was homeless, churches and shelters provided everything he needed to live a comfortable life, by his standards. This left him to pursue income for the sole purpose of feeding his addiction. Talk about a warm fuzzy feeling about my sacrifice to help those in need, lol! I have worked in shelters and it saddens me to watch the volunteers put themselves out thinking they are making a positive impact on the problem. I have come to realize that most of the help given to those who do not wish to change their situation .or behavior is nothing more enabling. There is a very small percentage of homeless that truly wish to better themselves and have just fallen on hard times and thanks to the greed and selfishness of many, most can't get the help they deserve. Life has a funny way of holding us all accountable for our actions.

The poor choices of people and lack of ownership of those choices really hits a nerve with me. 


100% correct.  I will give to those in need if I can but if I know they have an addiction problem I will not give money from my hand to their hand.  I'll buy food for them, pay a bill for them, take them out for a meal but never ever give them cash.

In the end we all suffer on behalf of people that make poor choices.   

 

The reality is in some cities is that  it is easier to be homeless, the legislation in the area and the climate make these locations support a homeless population more readily then say the midwest. That said when we look at this population we throw together a lot of housing solutions and we don't do a good job of systematically evaluating those solutions with data. We keep throwing money at the "problem" with a goal of housing everyone.  I don't believe the goal should be housing per se, it should be more like self sufficiency while respecting other peoples rights. You can help some but some will always be homeless either by choice or because they can't abide by societies rules.  

 Homeless has a lot of different causes, mental illness being a portion of the homeless. If you are schizophrenic and your parent was too there isn't a lot of resources to become and stay successful. I believe society has a responsibility to help to stabilize. As for addicts, although it is a mental illness,  supporting someone recovering is different from supporting someone using... and some people will always be homeless.  you can't help those who won't help themselves.

That said do I think I should take a chance to rent to people with these issues?  No, that is what the government is supposed to be doing with at least some of my taxes already-- providing adequate and effective programs.

The homeless issue is very complex....much more so than most really appreciate. There are multiple factors that all play a role and there will never be a quick and easy solution.....

Rising cost of housing and overall cost of living

Stagnant wages...... lag FAR behind increase in cost of living

Poor education system

Poor family system..... if you get raised by a deadbeat loser, you will probably be one too...

Poor healthcare system...... cost and availability of care

Mental illness

Drug and alcohol addiction

Loss of lower level blue collar jobs..... those jobs are disappearing

General loss of a hard work ethic in our society

ALL of these play a role....

Attributing it to just being" lazy" is absurd....... just like when morons tell people with clinical depression to just "shake it off and put on a smile"...... might as well tell the guy with cancer to "rub some dirt on it" and get back out there.

So personal citizens and LL should be held responsible to fix it....... and the government should fix it..... but we don't want big government....we don't want higher taxes.....we don't want the government telling us what to do.....we want our freedom....... so make up your mind

Can anyone cite any study where it states that a decent % of homeless people are healthy (no mental illness or addiction issues) and CHOOSE to be homeless?

Are there some?....sure...... but I would bet its a tiny fraction

Contrast that to the % of people that are teetering on the verge of being homeless...... one missed paycheck or other financial crisis and they are on the street.....

So lets not use the "lazy and choose to be homeless" as the poster child of the issue.... the facts just don't support that position

I saw this episode of 60 Minutes also.  It was saddening, partly because helping get homeless off of the streets are part of my "why," part of the reason I'm in this business.  I just wish I could meet my goals faster so I could contribute to the effort more; Not just give a place to stay, but help get them back into the workforce, and confident about themselves, as well.  Well, for those homeless who want a better life, I would like to help.  

I saw a commercial tonight asking for donations for an organization that helps homeless people. They said "1 in 10 young adults are homeless." That just sounds like a bunch of hooey to me. Anyone know what the real statistics are? 

Originally posted by @Sylvia B. :

I saw a commercial tonight asking for donations for an organization that helps homeless people. They said "1 in 10 young adults are homeless." That just sounds like a bunch of hooey to me. Anyone know what the real statistics are? 

 https://endhomelessness.org/ho...

this page has gobs of stats..... 

and this page states that 1 in 10 youth experience homelessness - so it seems to be a real number

http://www.ncsl.org/research/h...

what I find interesting after  looking at some of these websites, is that most of the homeless are NOT chronically homeless....  that number is much lower...  so it seems that the majority of the homeless are temporarily homeless....  

Originally posted by @Mary Mitchell :
Originally posted by @Sylvia B.:

I saw a commercial tonight asking for donations for an organization that helps homeless people. They said "1 in 10 young adults are homeless." That just sounds like a bunch of hooey to me. Anyone know what the real statistics are? 

 https://endhomelessness.org/ho...

this page has gobs of stats..... 

and this page states that 1 in 10 youth experience homelessness - so it seems to be a real number

http://www.ncsl.org/research/h...

That statistic seems more believable to me, but there's a big difference between "1 in 10 are homeless" and "1 in 10 experience homelessness."

For all the people that are outraged on how the homeless issue is being handled, I'd like to see some suggestions on how to improve it....beyond "stop being so lazy and get a job"....

Its very easy to critique, criticize and armchair quarterback it all..... much harder to actually offer a constructive plan to improve what they see as a mismanaged issue

Originally posted by @Ned J. :

For all the people that are outraged on how the homeless issue is being handled, I'd like to see some suggestions on how to improve it....beyond "stop being so lazy and get a job"....

Its very easy to critique, criticize and armchair quarterback it all..... much harder to actually offer a constructive plan to improve what they see as a mismanaged issue

I've actually worked with them what have you done?

 

Originally posted by @Christopher B. :

I saw this episode of 60 Minutes also.  It was saddening, partly because helping get homeless off of the streets are part of my "why," part of the reason I'm in this business.  I just wish I could meet my goals faster so I could contribute to the effort more; Not just give a place to stay, but help get them back into the workforce, and confident about themselves, as well.  Well, for those homeless who want a better life, I would like to help.  

Then go to the homeless shelters and put in some time. They won't bite you, at least most won't. (Yes, I've spent years volunteering.)

 

The first thing we can do is stop calling it a homeless crisis. Homelessness is a symptom of the problem. The real problem is drug addiction and mental illness. Drug addicts flock to the downtown areas of Seattle and other cities because of the services provided such as clean needles, shelter, and food. The high prices exacerbate the issue but are not the problem. The high rent prices are merely a talking point for liberal politicians to attack so they can put the blame on the rich.

Originally posted by @Mike M. :
Originally posted by @Christopher B.:

I saw this episode of 60 Minutes also.  It was saddening, partly because helping get homeless off of the streets are part of my "why," part of the reason I'm in this business.  I just wish I could meet my goals faster so I could contribute to the effort more; Not just give a place to stay, but help get them back into the workforce, and confident about themselves, as well.  Well, for those homeless who want a better life, I would like to help.  

Then go to the homeless shelters and put in some time. They won't bite you, at least most won't. (Yes, I've spent years volunteering.)

 

You're right.  Yes, I volunteer lots throughout the year, but there is always more to be done.  

 

Originally posted by @Mary Mitchell :
Originally posted by @Sylvia B.:

I saw a commercial tonight asking for donations for an organization that helps homeless people. They said "1 in 10 young adults are homeless." That just sounds like a bunch of hooey to me. Anyone know what the real statistics are this page has gobs of stats.....  

and this page states that 1 in 10 youth experience homelessness - so it seems to be a real number

http://www.ncsl.org/research/h...

 There are 74 million children (under 18) in the US.  There are ~550,000 homeless.  So obviously 1 in 10 are not homeless.  Even if it is 18-24 (young adults) that makes no sense This is just a definition used by advocates to try and inflate the issue.  When they say “experience homelessness” your mind goes to them being homeless.   But they are using degrees of separation to try and inflate the issue.  1 in 10 know someone who was homeless or has met someone who is homeless.   That is a totally separate thing. 

I understand they want to be an advocate, but they are misleading people. In actuality, like crime, homelessness is actually dropping over a long term trend.  

https://www.hud.gov/press/pres...



Originally posted by @Christopher B. :
Originally posted by @Mike M.:
Originally posted by @Christopher B.:

I saw this episode of 60 Minutes also.  It was saddening, partly because helping get homeless off of the streets are part of my "why," part of the reason I'm in this business.  I just wish I could meet my goals faster so I could contribute to the effort more; Not just give a place to stay, but help get them back into the workforce, and confident about themselves, as well.  Well, for those homeless who want a better life, I would like to help.  

Then go to the homeless shelters and put in some time. They won't bite you, at least most won't. (Yes, I've spent years volunteering.)  

You're right.  Yes, I volunteer lots throughout the year, but there is always more to be done.  


Thanks for volunteering. There are about 330,000,000 Americans - it's their turn to join in instead of just being bleeding hearts and thinking our taxes should be raised so the government dole out more money for votes. 

 

I haven't watched the 60 Minutes episode, but found this website was really helpful in explaining how a whole host of factors influence homelessness: https://www.homelesshub.ca/about-homelessness/homelessness-101/causes-homelessness. Because there are so many factors, I believe it will take a combined public and private effort to end. However, here are some things we as investors can do to help:
1) Volunteer with a local organization working to help end homelessness.
2) Invest in affordable housing (Section 8, low income housing tax credit (LIHTC), Veterans Affairs Supportive Housing (VASH), etc.) by accepting subsidy vouchers at your rentals, partner with experienced developers on larger projects or invest in equity funds that provide capital to develop affordable housing.
3) Invest in naturally occurring affordable housing.

Originally posted by @Ned J. :

For all the people that are outraged on how the homeless issue is being handled, I'd like to see some suggestions on how to improve it....beyond "stop being so lazy and get a job"....

Its very easy to critique, criticize and armchair quarterback it all..... much harder to actually offer a constructive plan to improve what they see as a mismanaged issue

 sure, here is a suggestion and constructive plan...start volunteering at your local GOP office and next november vote straight republican. It's a shame what certain politicians have let happen to california, seattle, portland, etc.  

@Keith A. ..... I just assume put a bullet in my head than have ANYTHING to do with the current GOP leadership....and I'm a registered republican..... but rather than get into a political discuss on a RE site, we'll just leave it at that and move on....

Like many issues that real focus has to be on working to solve the "WHY".... not the symptom of the issue itself. WHY are these people homeless? And it ISNT because a huge % of them are just lazy parasites on the system.... there is WAY more it than that....so for all the people throwing all the blame at the "stupid liberal democrats" that have "ruined CA", I'm still waiting for your solutions beyond screaming at them to "GET A JOB YOU LAZY POS".....

Originally posted by @Ned J. :

@Keith A...... I just assume put a bullet in my head than have ANYTHING to do with the current GOP leadership....and I'm a registered republican..... but rather than get into a political discuss on a RE site, we'll just leave it at that and move on....

Like many issues that real focus has to be on working to solve the "WHY".... not the symptom of the issue itself. WHY are these people homeless? And it ISNT because a huge % of them are just lazy parasites on the system.... there is WAY more it than that....so for all the people throwing all the blame at the "stupid liberal democrats" that have "ruined CA", I'm still waiting for your solutions beyond screaming at them to "GET A JOB YOU LAZY POS".....

LOL - I used to be a registered democrat up until 3 years ago.

Its very simple - if you make it attractive for people to be lazy - then they ABSOLUTELY will. If you want people that live on the street, then pass laws in favor of that. If you want people of every background to be able to earn an honest living with a good wage while not being encouraged by "free sh*t" then pass laws for that. It's obvious why things are the way they are in those specific areas.  As a landlord, I offer affordable housing for people that work for their income and don't commit crimes (providing pay stubs and background checks). Or I could attract people by offering free needles, free rent if you don't feel like paying, and pay for their doctors visits too.

Regardless of who the gop leadership is (even though this is the greatest our country has ever been) and you vote purely based on policies that put people to work instead of making street life easier, then the choice is simple - it's who you vote for.   Don't shoot the messenger :)   And if you want an organization to help true people in need - donate to Wounded Warriors. 

 

I don’t know about anybody else on here ( maybe I’m the oddball) but I didn’t get into real estate to solve the worlds problems or fix the ills of my community . I’m doing this to make money Plain and simple ..Atleast I’ll admit it ! Please pardon me if that seems callous and selfish but I’m a republican capitalist so I don’t believe in ~hope and change~



You see I’m not smart enough to play the stock market ( I can barely string sentences together on this message board) and I can’t throw a piece of inflated leather 80 yards  down a field , or slam dunk a basketball so looks like I’m stuck renting out these dumpy houses to idiots with non opposing thumbs to make extra money for the remainder of my life . If they want a better life then they should do what I do . Work like a mad man ,save your money ,and stop blowing it on stupid crap . I suppose that  is my sage advise to end poverty - work hard ..even if your dumb or crazy . Hard work pays off , laying in the couch watching Maury Povich does NOT pay off 

@keith A....... and of course your response is " GET A JOB YOU LAZY POS"....

No solution...... just "get a job you bum" because everything is "free"..... that's the total reason there are homeless people......

GOP leadership is "the greatest this country has ever been".... right there I can tell I'm talking to some one that is delusional...... so I'm just going to stop and move on with my life....

And in NO WAY am I advocating for landlords to solve the worlds problems when it comes to ANYTHING....let alone the homeless issue.... I'm in this to make $$ just like the rest of you and its not my job to provide cheap housing..... I provide housing based on the market rate, nothing more nothing less.....

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