How often do tenants destroy property during eviction?

5 Replies

Currently evicting a mother of four children. she is an inherited tenant. In your experience, how often does the tenant intentionally damage the unit during eviction? I'm already planning on new carpet, paint job, cleaning up a bunch of trash, etc. But how often do they rip all the plumbing out and break the sheetrock, etc? 

its a lower income property in a C area. I'm assuming its pretty rare for one to do major retalitory damage, but I know it does happen. 

I'm probably just being nervous, its my first eviction. 

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I've been renting houses for over 20 years and I've only had one that vandalized the property on their way out. Knocked a couple of holes in the walls spray painted graffiti on pretty much every wall in the house. Looked far worse than it was. Took some extra primer and a couple of patches. Not much worse than getting rid of a dirty tenant.

Originally posted by @Carl Pickens :

Currently evicting a mother of four children. she is an inherited tenant. In your experience, how often does the tenant intentionally damage the unit during eviction? I'm already planning on new carpet, paint job, cleaning up a bunch of trash, etc. But how often do they rip all the plumbing out and break the sheetrock, etc? 

 I run a $45M+ portfolio consisting of over 800 rentals so I've seen it all. Some of my favs are

  • Couches thrown through second story windows.
  • Bed bugs.
  • Tenants steal hot water tanks on the way out.
  • Tenants turning on the bath tub then abandoning the house.
  • Concrete in the toilet.

All that said it is a rarity that extreme damage like above is going to happen. The nicer the property the less likely it is to happen. If you have a tenant who has a decent job history or other responsibilities they typically do not engage in criminal damaging behavior as they understand that there are negative consequences for their actions. These types of things tend to happen in lower income areas. They happen when the tenants don't really have a fear of your recourse as their isn't much you can take away from them. If you file suit and get an order to garnish their wages they will simply quit their job to avoid payment.

Ya it happens,, nightmare stories.. I've just about seen it all ...40 years of rentals.. 

you might just be smart to tell tenant you understand she's had a very hard time,, but that you'll help defray the expense of relocating by giving her $250.00 cash if she can have all the items cleared out and swept clean.. when she leaves..you understand their are items that will need attention 

HONESTLY worth every penny.