Landlording & Rental Properties

Landlording Tip: Screen Your Tenants

Expertise: Real Estate Marketing, Personal Development, Real Estate News & Commentary, Mortgages & Creative Financing, Real Estate Investing Basics, Landlording & Rental Properties, Flipping Houses, Personal Finance, Business Management
301 Articles Written
I realize that this is a very basic tenet, but when times are rough, we don’t always follow it. The reason we screen tenants is to ensure that we, as landlords, will be paid, and that our property will not be damaged or destroyed. What happens when the market is slow and you can’t find [...] View the full article: Landlording Tip: Screen Your Tenants on The BiggerPockets Blog. This content is Copyright © 2017 BiggerPockets, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

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Joshua Dorkin is a serial entrepreneur, investor, podcaster, publisher, educator, and co-author of
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    Teresa Boardman
    Replied over 13 years ago
    wow! This picture is why people are sometimes afraid to invest in rental property. I have a friend who owns several and is selling in favor of vacant land and office condos.
    fatbear
    Replied over 13 years ago
    One other point. I’m the MGP of a 50+ unit Section 8 (only) bldg, for which we have professional management. Every prospective tenant (and others the tenant wishes to live in the unit) takes a drug test, and we have the right to request a re-test on each renewal. A positive result means no lease, or no renewal – no exceptions. I cannot overemphasize the importance of this. (Check the rules/laws in your location before you insitute these tests.)
    Dawna
    Replied over 7 years ago
    Which state are you in that they allow drug testing. I say if someone gets any government hand out they need to be drug tested other wise you might as well sign the check over to the local drug dealer.
    Dave
    Replied over 12 years ago
    I’m a small portfolio landlord from UK. I’ve had a few problem tenants but i’m now slowly learning to not be so lenient on them and to take action as soon as they are late. they always hae some excuse and they don’t make any effort to pay you. they could for instance sell half the stuff in the house. take on extra jobs etc. etc. i agree that tenant screening is very important, we can’t afford to cut corners there.
    Dave
    Replied over 12 years ago
    I’m a small portfolio landlord from UK. I’ve had a few problem tenants but i’m now slowly learning to not be so lenient on them and to take action as soon as they are late. they always hae some excuse and they don’t make any effort to pay you. they could for instance sell half the stuff in the house. take on extra jobs etc. etc. i agree that tenant screening is very important, we can’t afford to cut corners there.
    Anonymous
    Replied about 12 years ago
    If you end up with having a wrong tenant, not only your house would be in ruins but also your health. The pressure tension and stress that comes along is inexplicable. You end up in spending huge sums of money with wrong tenant. I am telling all this out of the practical experience that I had a few years back. Make sure that his financial capability is really good before entering into the agreement.
    Anonymous
    Replied about 12 years ago
    If you end up with having a wrong tenant, not only your house would be in ruins but also your health. The pressure tension and stress that comes along is inexplicable. You end up in spending huge sums of money with wrong tenant. I am telling all this out of the practical experience that I had a few years back. Make sure that his financial capability is really good before entering into the agreement.
    KP
    Replied over 7 years ago
    My only question is about “contacting previous landlords.” Would they tell the truth about bad tenants, or would they give a glowing review just so they could get rid of them? I’m always leery of references for this reason.