Should you build rapport with every seller?

7 Replies

Hi everyone,

I'm wondering. When you speak with sellers, should you build rapport with every seller, even the ones who aren't motivated?

Or should you just stop talking to sellers when you find out they aren't motivated and submit an offer? Currently, I try to build rapport with every seller, but it seems like a waste of time because I find that most unmotivated sellers don't like it when I ask questions about why they are selling or if they have a new house picked out already or what thier goal is when they sell the house. What should I do? Thanks. 

@John Baker

I have been thinking a lot about this in my own business and in real estate. @Brandon Turner has recently been saying a lot about the 80/20 rule in effort expenditure: 20% of your work produces 80% of the value. I think making decisions like these are tough because you don't want to feel like you are missing out, but it's less likely to create results.

I would decide what you can do better in lieu of building the rapport. As soon as you can make a value statement about that 'other activity' it makes much more sense to monitor your seller networking. If the alternative is sitting at home and watching TV, you mine as well do it. 

It depends on your personality. I know people who hang up on unmotivated sellers without another word. I'm more friendly and don't mind chatting for a bit. When I give them my offer they tend to become a lot less friendly. To answer your question though, yes building rapport with unmotivated sellers for the most part is a waste of time. 

Originally posted by @Nick C. :

It depends on your personality. I know people who hang up on unmotivated sellers without another word. I'm more friendly and don't mind chatting for a bit. When I give them my offer they tend to become a lot less friendly. To answer your question though, yes building rapport with unmotivated sellers for the most part is a waste of time. 

 I don't mind talking, as well, about things me and the seller have in common. Also, you are definitely right about the offer part. Whenever I make an offer to an unmotivated seller, sometimes they get upset, as if I owe them something. Lol. Maybe, it might be because I haven't built enough rapport with them? I don't know. But thanks for the reply anyways. 

Originally posted by @Trevor Ewen :

@John Baker

I have been thinking a lot about this in my own business and in real estate. @Brandon Turner has recently been saying a lot about the 80/20 rule in effort expenditure: 20% of your work produces 80% of the value. I think making decisions like these are tough because you don't want to feel like you are missing out, but it's less likely to create results.

I would decide what you can do better in lieu of building the rapport. As soon as you can make a value statement about that 'other activity' it makes much more sense to monitor your seller networking. If the alternative is sitting at home and watching TV, you mine as well do it. 

Ok, sounds reasonable. But what do I do if they don't want to talk so that I can get to know them and thier situation? Sometimes, sellers are upset as soon as we start talking over the phone or when I ask them questions about thier house and themselves. Should I just end the conversation and tell them I will write up an offer and send it to them? And then should I follow up with them in a month or so when they have cooled off? Thanks for the reply btw. 

John if a seller thinks his house is worth $200k and you offer him $50k no amount of rapport on earth is going to keep them from getting upset. Some people are polite and just say no thanks, but a lot of people are just angry people. No other explanation, they're angry when commercials come on the TV, they're angry if they have to wait in line somewhere, they're angry when someone is driving too slow or too fast, they're angry when they realize their house isn't worth half of what they thought it was, and so on... 

@John Baker Personally,  I believe the importance of building a rapport with every person in this field you interact with. Left to our own devices and decided who, is worth the extra attention is very slippery path. In my opinion, building positive relationships with everyone will only help you be successful.

Originally posted by @Nick Britton :

@John Baker Personally,  I believe the importance of building a rapport with every person in this field you interact with. Left to our own devices and decided who, is worth the extra attention is very slippery path. In my opinion, building positive relationships with everyone will only help you be successful.

Your right. Now that I think about it. It's better to have a good relationship with everyone. Who knows? Maybe, I might get a referral or maybe they might be motivated and remember me down the line. I don't know why I didn't get it before, but thanks for helping me realize this. Thanks for the reply and advice by the way.

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