Picked the wrong Painter - how to fix tape seams and shoddy work?

19 Replies

BP,

Trying to finish up a rehab and hired a guy to paint.  Unfortunately didn't babysit throughout the process, and was left with some pretty rough work.  How do I pick up the pieces and fix these issues?  Are they fix-able?

The problem is not your painter unless he also did the drywall mudding. You need to hire someone to re-mud then go back in and redo the paint.

If the painter also did the mud you need to find someone actually qualified to do drywall mudding. Who ever did the job obviously has never mudded before and is not qualified.

Originally posted by @Thomas S. :

The problem is not your painter unless he also did the drywall mudding. You need to hire someone to re-mud then go back in and redo the paint.

If the painter also did the mud you need to find someone actually qualified to do drywall mudding. Who ever did the job obviously has never mudded before and is not qualified.

 Agreed.  Can I just hit these spots, or is this a complete re-do?

@Chris Purcell

Yes, you can just fix those spots and hopefully paint with correctly-colormatched paint. But the guy who fixes them has to know what he's doing, and it's going to take a few days.

@Jim K. @Thomas S.

Thanks for the replies.  I will be more careful who I hire.

I was reading up last night.  It looks after the spackle is fully done sanding, you can prime.  After you prime, then you really inspect the walls and hit with another coat on any imperfections to avoid this.

Do you agree?

@Chris Purcell

You're setting yourself up for a painful fall if you plan on doing this yourself now. Unless you're willing to invest in this for a loss as an autonomous learning experience, get someone.

I should add that all my impish personal demons are whispering to me to tell you to just pick up some spackle at the dollar store and go for it.

Originally posted by @Jim K. :

@Chris Purcell

You're setting yourself up for a painful fall if you plan on doing this yourself now. Unless you're willing to invest in this for a loss as an autonomous learning experience, get someone.

I should add that all my impish personal demons are whispering to me to tell you to just pick up some spackle at the dollar store and go for it.

Not sure where I said I was doing it myself?

I'm going to hire someone.

I'm saying in the future - to avoid imperfections like this, to inspect the walls after they are taped, spackled, and PRIMED.  And then to re-apply more coats of spackle until they are perfect.   I failed to inspect the walls before the painted or I could have caught this

@Chris Purcell

OK, I assumed, my bad. Those demons were very insistent!

The way you need to inspect flat walls for bumpy finishing work after spackling and sanding and priming is with a bright worklight held at 90 degrees from the work. If you see shadows and ridges, they'll show up on the paint job, more so on satin and semi-gloss finished walls than walls painted with flat paint. For inside and outside corners, get your head close to the wall and eyeball up and down the angle. You've likely seen an experienced general contractor unobtrusively do this at some point. If an edge is taped poorly, you'll see the deviations from 90 degrees most easily sighting along it like this. If you can feel a hump or deviation under your fingers, it will be obvious in a finished paint job.

Most work will not be perfect. So make a habit of lighting up and looking at finished flat walls and eyeballing edges of work that seem well-finished to you. In a reasonably short time, you'll get a much better sense of what's acceptable work and what isn't before you give the go-ahead to paint. You'll also develop an appreciation for how little really good finishing work happens in this country, and how many dudes who pretend they can do this well are not gifted with quality tool-using genes.

Originally posted by @Chris Purcell :

I'm saying in the future - to avoid imperfections like this, to inspect the walls after they are taped, spackled, and PRIMED.  And then to re-apply more coats of spackle until they are perfect.   I failed to inspect the walls before the painted or I could have caught this

It's not spackle you need, spackle is the stuff you use to fill small holes.  You need joint compound. 

And it looks like they never sanded the job.  You need to sand and make sure it looks good BEFORE you prime or paint it.  You're not going to be able to sand it down now.  You need to hire someone to add more joint compound (mud) over it and build it up so they can sand it down and get it to look even.  I repeat, you can't sand it down after it's been painted (or paint  more layers over it) to get it to look right.   

Originally posted by @Peter Sanchez :
Originally posted by @Chris Purcell:

I'm saying in the future - to avoid imperfections like this, to inspect the walls after they are taped, spackled, and PRIMED.  And then to re-apply more coats of spackle until they are perfect.   I failed to inspect the walls before the painted or I could have caught this

It's not spackle you need, spackle is the stuff you use to fill small holes.  You need joint compound. 

And it looks like they never sanded the job.  You need to sand and make sure it looks good BEFORE you prime or paint it.  You're not going to be able to sand it down now.  You need to hire someone to add more joint compound (mud) over it and build it up so they can sand it down and get it to look even.  I repeat, you can't sand it down after it's been painted (or paint  more layers over it) to get it to look right.   

Sorry, meant to say joint compound.  That's what he used.

But I agree - needs to be mudded and sanded then painted again.  Hopefully a few coats will soften it

Is this a house your selling or renting? What class a b c or d. I have several rentals. On a couple rentals I have, I'd let this ride all day.

A good taper won't ever touch a piece of sandpaper. This is fairly easy to fix for a drywall guy. It also doesn't have to take days... they sell quick dry mud and could be finished up in a day if it is a limited area. 

@Chris Purcell

All right, fine. Shut up, demons!

That work is going to be a cast-iron b**** to fix passably. Brace yourself and have very low expectations. I've seen worse -- obviously this guy did his level best with a sharply limited skillset. Yet the Khal had his way with you, and he was not gentle. You have been inducted into a large and diverse club of real estate investors, and I welcome you as a lifetime charter member.

Yeah....that's not a paint problem....that's a drywall/mud issue......should have been caught long before paint

Was this all new drywall? In what level of property? If this is a mid C/D unit I may let it ride and fix it the next go around....unless I can get the first guy to fix it now... which seems unlikely and I'm not sure I would let the same guy do the actual work. But if you had a bigger company do it, I would go to the contractor and tell them to fix it.

Originally posted by @Ned J. :

Yeah....that's not a paint problem....that's a drywall/mud issue......should have been caught long before paint

Was this all new drywall? In what level of property? If this is a mid C/D unit I may let it ride and fix it the next go around....unless I can get the first guy to fix it now... which seems unlikely and I'm not sure I would let the same guy do the actual work. But if you had a bigger company do it, I would go to the contractor and tell them to fix it.

It’s a D neighborhood.  But regardless I expect a standard of quality

"D neighborhood. But regardless I expect a standard of quality"

Your standard of quality needs to be reflected in the standard of the class of property. In a D class property, assuming you got a killer deal on the job, I would let it ride.  If you paid top dollar you paid too much for a D property regardless of the quality of work.

As already suggested since the job is done and it will not impact the rent I would leave it till it needs to be done again, which will likely be never.

If its a D class neighborhood then depending on what I started with and what I paid to make it "better" I may just let it ride "as is"..... the extra $$ I may have to pay to make it better just isn't worth it in that class of rental. It would come down to the $$ for me in this class of neighborhood....and I'm REALLY picky about stuff

Most D class tenants are not going to turn the place down because of these cosmetic issues.... so it would come down to $$....how much did I pay originally (be honest with yourself....did you get what you paid for?)...... what my cash flow/profit is on this place.....and what it will cost me to fix the issue to my standards....does it make $$ sense, or is my standard a bad $$ decision?

Now if I paid big $$ for this, then I would be pissed.....

Originally posted by @Chris Purcell :
It’s a D neighborhood.  But regardless I expect a standard of quality

Yeah, I got all kinds of great expectations in the ghetto, too. Always end up disappointed. Funny how that happens.