What's your why? Why are you after financial freedom?

34 Replies

I'm looking for a little inspiration here. I haven't posted in a while, probably because I haven't been thinking of real estate much lately.  I "started out" 5 years ago when I read "Rich Dad, Poor Dad," and dove in.  24 year old me had stars in his eyes, chasing after this thing I just learned about called "Financial Freedom" without knowing what the heck I'd do with it when/if I ever got it.  Bought a duplex that doesn't cash flow and now here I am, approaching my 30th revolution around the sun as the tired landlord I said I'd never be.

I realized that just not liking my job wasn't enough of a motivator for me.  So I dug a little deeper to find out why I'm after it and scared myself when I found out: I don't know!

So, investors on here, especially people starting out: why are you after this Financial Freedom goal? Does it go beyond the finances? What really makes you enjoy investing in real estate?

I just listened to BP podcast 286 with @AJ Osborne, and he sees FF as a need rather than a want. As he put it, "It’s something that everybody has to do. Financial freedom isn’t a good thing. It’s not a choice. But sometimes your treadmill will stop. I don’t know if that’s 62. I don’t know if that’s whenever but how are you going to live when your treadmill stops?"

That's my why. I see a point where my W2 wages will not grow exponentially enough to cover both student loans and child care costs. I see a point where I will HAVE to quit my job to raise children. I don't see FF as a choice.

Because I think people are meant for more than showing up to an office every day and sitting in some cube and doing the same thing day in and day out.  Because I see elderly who live on SS and a small pension and can't actually afford to LIVE in retirement.  They might be existing, but they certainly aren't living.  Because there is a lot of world out there and I intend to see it.  A day job is only going to hold that back. Also, it's cold in Idaho and I don't want to be homeless here.  I am a wimp and would never make it.

@Michael Fundaro I 100% agree with @Nicole Heasley - you have to make your goals a MUST. When you "must" do something you'll ignore excuses and find a way. You'll dig your heals in and work the extra hours.You'll make the extra call to a seller (even though you know the conversation is going to be uncomfortable). 

When you make things a MUST instead of a want or "nice to have", you act differently. 

I MUST create financial freedom in the event I get laid off from my job. 

I MUST create financial freedom so I can attend all my kids sporting event. 

I MUST create financial freedom so I can provide my kids a better life than I had. 

When you make financial freedom a MUST you'll have no trouble staying motivated to create your future. 

Interesting thread.  I'd like to address a point by @Sarah Brown first, then I'll dive into the OP's specific question.

I think a lot of people actually ARE cut out for being cube farm workers.  These are your typical 8 - 5, 40 hours a week, middle class Americans.  They maybe have a college degree (or not), they like to show up at 8 AM (or 8:05, or 8:10), grab a cup of coffee, swap stories at the water cooler, take an hour lunch (or 1 hour & 15 minutes) while they read a novel or play video games or stream the latest episode of GOT, and clock out at 5 PM (or 4:55), go home and that's their career.  They'll hopefully tuck aside 10% of their income into a 401K in a pre-defined series of stock mutual funds.  they take a 2 week vacation somewhere every year, have two cars on payments most of the time, pay off their mortgage after 30 years that usually includes 2 or 3 refinances to do home improvements and/or send their kids to college.  Then they hope to downsize and retire and enjoy the grand kids and traveling the country in an RV (on payments).

To be clear...there's nothing wrong with that if that's what someone decides.  But we all see what's missing in there: it's a cookie cutter life that is palletized, shrink wrapped, and shipped to someone as a "life" by the Amazons and institutions of modern America. 

But there's no entrepreneurial spirit.  Nothing to really cause one to step outside and take responsibility for one's own life and destiny.  These are the people who complain that "corporations have ruined America" and "the middle class lifestyle is disappearing."  They've never learned what it means to earn a living vs. having a pre-defined plan for living handed to them all pretty with a bow around it.  Again, that's fine if that's all you're fit for.  And for MANY people, that is all they are fit for.  This is the world that the Industrial Revolution and the rise of corporate America has built since the turn of the 19th Century.  It's the factor worker / blue collar career that began in the 1870s and gradually morphed in the 1960s-70s into the corporate American white collar career.

But some of us are weirdos and really want to sink our teeth into life and tear a hunk out of it, chew it up, and see how good it tastes.

100- 400 years ago we would have been pioneers, leaving family, friends, and a known way of life behind to strike it out on a dusty trail that was fraught with peril and no guarantees.  We would have been sailors on ships to "new" lands, frontier farmers scratching out a living, gold miners and prospectors, or rail road builders.  Sadly, the age of explorers and pioneers on this planet has come to an end.  Until Mr. Musk puts us on Mars we have to find something else to do.  Enter...the small business owner / entrepreneur / real estate investor!

We're not satisfied to lead a simple existence, and often times that is frustrating when our efforts achieve no results.  Still, we grind on, knowing there is something amazing about creating the thing that earns one's keep, even if it means following in the perilous footsteps of others.  Pioneers follow the trails of explorers.  Knowing at the end of the day there is no paycheck....no meat to put on the table, unless our conscious effort, will, wisdom, skill, determination, and a dab of good timing all come together to make it so.

That's what the whiners and complainers don't understand.  Wealth doesn't just show up.  It has to be created.  Sure, there are a few lucky (?) ones who get a pile of money dumped at their feet because they were born into a rich family or they won the Lottery, but almost 80% of wealthy Americans are 1st generation rich (The Millionaire Next Door by Dr. Thomas Stanley) meaning they willed that wealth into existence.  They persevered.  They showed up at 5 AM and stayed until 11 PM, unlike the 8-5ers above.  For them, "lunch" is 10 minutes to grab some food and scarf it down while calling vendors, tenants, customers, etc.  Vacations are put on hold for 3-10 years while building up a solid foundation and the business can start to run itself.

I can say the reason I (partially) chose this route is it's coded into my DNA. I have always wanted to know about the inner workings of systems and processes. It's fascinating. I like to build systems and processes...partly why I'm into Info Tech as a day job but thrive on my side-hustle of REI. I like to get my hands "dirty" in the real stuff of life. And I see the rewards are potentially much better for those of us who choose this route than for those who risk nothing other than simply following a path that most other people do.

Millenials may be the first group as a generation to reject the pre-defined life/career trend of the past 100 years more than others, but there's still a long way to go.  Maybe some day more people will find the lure of adventure and reward preferably to 40 years of the daily grind.  Every day is a great day to be a live and do something new and interesting...and hopefully get paid well for it!

@Erik W.

You can’t see me but I am giving you a standing ovation for this post. :). Precisely what I meant but you said it significantly better!

@Sarah Brown , thanks.  In my former life I was a high school English teacher.  But don't look too closely at my spelling and grammar.  I can't proof my own work, unfortunately.  *grins  But I like to wax poetic/philosophical at times.

Anyway, I want to give a shout out to the cube workers and cookie cutter careerists: again, there's nothing wrong with that and indeed there's a lot that is good in it.  In many ways the certainty and stability of that life is a boon to our economy.  Where would we be without people who are okay with doing the same general thing day after day?  Auto-mechanics, Govt workers, road crews, electric utility linesmen, firemen, police, etc: all are commendable people!  They do often thankless, repetitive, and sometimes dangerous tasks in exchange for their "40 years and out" plans.  And I'm so glad that they do.  Adding on to what I mentioned above, I've been in the corporate IT world for 15 years.  That stability of a "base" income has made taking risks in real estate easier for my family to stomach.  I'm not as daring as others who have bet it all on a single idea.  Many of my family and friends went that same, predictable route.  We need all kinds of folks to make this world go around.  Incidentally, these are the folks whom I LOVE to have as renters!  Stable, predictable, W-2 wage employees are the best in my view.

Millennials are the most mobile work force and are demanding changes that shift the way the traditional 40 hour week goes.  Flexible schedules, more time off, creative work environments, more ownership in decision-making...all good things.  I think we will see that trend continue, possible to the point where there are more small companies and local businesses because there is a closer connection to the work that brings with it a reward beyond a paycheck.

For me, I want to achieve financial freedom so that other people cannot control my decisions or dictate the decisions I make for my career.  Most people are afraid that if they step out of line or stand up for themselves they will be fired because the company they work for has tons of applicants just ready to take their spot.  And for the most part, that is true.  The fear and risk of losing their paycheck is too much.  And companies know this, so they start forcing more work on to people with little or no reward.

Personally, my search for financial freedom has come from three points in my career.  I have worked for three companies and and currently on the fourth in nine years.

Company one, the first one, I wasn't really getting much out of it and was not doing the work I wanted to be doing.  I wanted to be a financial analyst, as I have a college degree in finance, but was working in transportation.  I graduated 2010 in to a tough labor market, especially with a degree in finance.  In short, I didn't really see my self growing with the company.  I was with them for three and a half years before I moved on.  Really this step, there wasn't any one thing that really ignited the fire, but just the general I know I could do better for myself.

Company number two.  I worked  for this company for three and a half years in a compliance related role due to a company rotational program.  In this time, I had four managers (one during rotation, and three once placed in to a role).  Manager number 3 promoted me, then a year later, manager number four put me on a performance improvement plan  (PIP).  During the five week plan, I found another job and resigned. Somehow, I went from being promoted to being ready to be shown the door in one years time, under two different managers.  This got the fire started within me to begin thinking about financial freedom and began looking at rentals as a path to achieve that.

Company number three.  I worked for this company for a year and a half, and everything was great.  Until my wife found a dream job in another state.  This was a small company that had a couple remote employees.  So I asked if I could work remotely.  Now some detail, I submitted my request, and they were working on it.  I asked for an update from the HR director (small company of 70-80 people).  HR director said that they wouldn't be able to accommodate my request and they would be terminating my employment for someone who could work locally.  So now the drama begins.  In this same meeting I said I don't think this would be a good idea because of 1) the Chief Compliance Officer was resigning at the end of the month and continuity in the department would be beneficial for me to stay on.   The team was made up of myself and the Compliance Officer at the time. 2) The company was not in a good place with our regulator, and as such, continuity would be beneficial if I were to stay on.  To conclude this meeting, I said I wanted to stay on and I did not want to resign.  Despite this, the HR director continued with her plan telling my manager (Chief Compliance Officer) that I had resigned.  When my manager asked me about this, I said, I did not resign and what she is saying is false.  To add to this, apparently, I was told the CEO didn't like my responses I made to the HR director, and deeming my responses as "threats." (not sure what was threatening about what I said).  I continued to work there a month or two, with more drama related to me asking for a relocation with the end result of me submitting my immediate resignation when my manager walked in to work that morning.  We agreed for me to work until noon, which I did and left.

This saga again reinforces the fear that companies use to push employees around to get what they want with little benefit for the employee except for a paycheck.  During this time, I had one rental property with the plan to purchase more, so I was moving in the direction I wanted. But now, I have the absolute fire to grow it as fast as I am financial able to.  So when an employer offers me a raw deal, I can tell them respectfully no, knowing I have the financial independence to make a decision.

I am now at company number four in the state of my wife's dream job as a financial analyst (finally) and thrilled performing in a role that I went to college for and the passion to do; at least until I am financially independent to follow my own life's desires.

I really believe @Erik W. said it best here, but I will give you my WHY. I remember hearing the idea that you need to out live your money in retirement. I didn't fully understand what that meant until I recently watched my parents near retirement age. They have to HOPE that their money out lives them. That statement still drives fear into me. The idea that I need to DIE before my money runs out to have a successful retirement based of society's views. Or worse I don't out live my money and I become a burden to someone else. That is what drives me in short.

I want to be in control of my retirement and not have to hope that I die sooner rather than later. I want to be able to make the choice to see the world in a moments notice because I did something that was uncomfortable when I was younger. I want to ensure that my children have a better life than I was allowed. I don't want to ever have to miss a milestone within their lives because I had to work or didn't have enough time saved to be there. Similar to what @Cameron Tope said in that I have to achieve financial freedom to ensure these things happen. I have responsibility to my goals to make it happen. It can't be a choice if I want these things in my life. It has to happen!

@Cameron Tope @Nicole Heasley thanks for that insight! Viewing financial freedom as a need or a "must have" is an awesome way to think about it.  Makes me re-frame my thinking to something like "I need to be free, and in the societal system we live in, that freedom looks like financial freedom."  Changing that belief to a need instead of a want sounds like a big difference maker.

@Sarah Brown and @Erik W. , I agree 100%. I ask myself if I am going insane sitting in this cube farm.  Seeing people around me comfortable with the idea of spending the next 3 decades here makes me want to shake them and yell WAKE UP! Then the self doubt sets in and I start thinking "well why can't I just be happy with that like everybody else?"  So Erik thanks for your words, what I gather from them is that its true that it doesn't have to be black and white, right way vs. wrong way..  and I think that is what I've been missing. The world we live in is one big grey area and I'm still trying to find my particular shade.

@Brian Spies I appreciate your detailed story.  It's stories like that that I think a lot of investors can relate to.  I find it admirable that you are able to trust yourself with the responsibility of financial freedom instead of succumbing to the fear of being without a steady paycheck.

Originally posted by @Michael Fundaro :

I'm looking for a little inspiration here. I haven't posted in a while, probably because I haven't been thinking of real estate much lately.  I "started out" 5 years ago when I read "Rich Dad, Poor Dad," and dove in.  24 year old me had stars in his eyes, chasing after this thing I just learned about called "Financial Freedom" without knowing what the heck I'd do with it when/if I ever got it.  Bought a duplex that doesn't cash flow and now here I am, approaching my 30th revolution around the sun as the tired landlord I said I'd never be.

I realized that just not liking my job wasn't enough of a motivator for me.  So I dug a little deeper to find out why I'm after it and scared myself when I found out: I don't know!

So, investors on here, especially people starting out: why are you after this Financial Freedom goal? Does it go beyond the finances? What really makes you enjoy investing in real estate?

Growing up, I was the poor kid among my friends. My parents were (and unfortunately still are) slaves to their jobs. They never got to see their parents/siblings, we never went to dinner or spent time as a family because they were always working, and they never got to do anything they liked/enjoyed. My parents both live about 6 hours from their parents/siblings yet they only have seen them once or twice a year for a couple of days for the last several decades. They are stuck in the depressing Midwest and would love to leave but can't. I have two older siblings and I watched both of them fall into this exact same trap. This was the reality for my aunts/uncles/grandparents as well. 

This is completely unacceptable and I will not fall into the same situation under any circumstance. I will not compromise on spending time with the people I care about and doing the things I enjoy. Investing in real estate has absolutely nothing to do with anything material and has everything to do with freedom over my time (i.e. MY LIFE). If I decide I want to fly home and see my parents tomorrow, I can. If I wake up and don't feel like working, I won't. I control my time, nothing and nobody else does, PERIOD. 

That's why I invest in real estate and I've found that to be the case for most investors I know. 

-Dan

 

@Michael Fundaro .... yeah, if you shook some of the cube farmers and ask them to "wake up", they'd just look at you funny....and rightly so.

Some people choose life paths that are more laid out and predictable.  Some choose to burn the ships and go on an adventure.  Neither one is right or wrong, and both need each other.  All the die hard real estate entrepreneurs here NEED W-2 cube farmers to rent their apartments, houses, and duplexes.  Most of us wouldn't trust a self-employed person who works for cash under the table, would we?  No....we like it when our tenants get those sweet, steady paychecks.  Banks do too, and banks are the ones who loan us money to buy stuff.  Stability and predictability is incredibly valuable for society and an economy.

Imagine what life would look like if a majority of Americans sought financial freedom thru real estate.  Prices would sky rocket as demand would quickly outstrip supply.  In the end, we'd all probably end up owning 1 or maybe 2 units besides our own home to provide a temporary place to stay for those who hadn't saved up enough yet to buy their first house hack duplex.  In general, no one would rise to the top because the top would be only a slight variance from the bottom: there would be renters and LLs who had at most 2 or 3 units.  We wouldn't have folks with 3,000 doors or even 30 doors!

What would our collected rents look like if we only had entrepreneurs to rent to?  Considering 80% of small businesses fail within 2 years, we'd have a lot of evictions, I would guess.

So yes, my hat is off to those predictable people who--like I myself--grind out a daily income from an employer.  It's okay!  It's very useful to us all.  If everyone is the Captain, then who are the sailors?  If everyone is a Chief, then who are the braves?  Not every Soldier can be the General.  You need privates and sergeants....lieutenants, captains, and colonels....or there is no Army.

Btw, my "daily grind" isn't too bad.  Being in IT software development, I work from home.  I've had a corner office with a window (aka my spare bedroom) for almost 8 years, a corporate perk that use to take a person 20 years to achieve, if ever.  I left the cube farm behind a long time ago and don't plan on ever going back.  The coffee & commute are pretty good too....  *grins

As someone that reached FF 12 years ago the answer is freedom.  I do what I want when I want. Got up at 10AM today, I might do something today but it's cold outside.  

For me it’s the time. I want TIME to do what I want. TIME is the most important currency to me so the closer I get to taking back and owning my time the better off I feel I will be.

Time so I can be charitable, help sick family members, time with my growing family, travel, teaching, mentoring, hiking, biking and volunteer work to keep myself humble and grateful for the life I’ve been given! This is what truly fulfills me. 

@Michael Fundaro

I truly enjoy the hunt. Every house, financially, has a story. When you have looked at enough assessors websites, public documents, mls, ect.

It becomes pretty easy to pick some winners. I like the idea of getting a deal of a lifetime, finding value, and making a place perform at its highest use.

Maybe it’s because when I was a kid I used to buy baseball cards and look up the value. RE investing just has bigger numbers.

A good motivator for me to be financially free is to be in charge of my time. Not having to work for someone else 40-50 hours a week for the next 30 years.

The only thing every single person has in common is that we only have 24hrs a day.

If your content with spending 8hrs of them working for someone else than I'd hope you at least enjoy what you do. 

@Michael Fundaro

I did it because it was ALOT easier to buy a bunch of cash flowing rentals than it was to continue getting up at 3:30 in the morning to do manual work all day long. Now I am bored though lol...

Make my own schedule each day.

Set and follow my own rules and policies, not someone else's.

The freedom to make each day look and feel different from the day before.

Great post, @Michael Fundaro , and I hope you got some of the inspiration you're looking for.  

To look at this from another lens, I'll chime in that the while FI sounds like the ultimate dream, it can be scary.  Careers are often part of people's identity, their social circle and for some, their only network. If the goal is FI, we have to figure out what we want, draw up our own blueprints for the life we want, make the decisions to get us there...and ultimately be accountable for our successes and failures.  It's so much easier to work a regular job and let others make those choices for you, especially when many people haven't done that soul searching to figure out what they want.  

It's okay not to know what your why is just yet..just keep doing the soul searching.  You have many more rotations around the sun ahead of you to figure it out!


Without a doubt @Sarah Brown & @Erik W. said it best.

My wife and I are currently traveling, working, living nomadically fulltime in our RV chasing our financial freedom. We are 14 months into our 3 year debt free journey. We are both 36 years old and grew tired if the mundane and living a life “that you are supposed to live”. We had all the debt, living in a HCOL area, no car payments, made okay decisions financially, but we lacked TIME together. We both work in healthcare which is stressful and demanding. We had zero control of our schedules that often spiraled and left us without time to enjoy each other.

In the 1st 12 months, we successfully paid off $137k in student loan debt. In the last 2 months, we've established 6 months of an emergency fund while building out our retirement accounts. We have a savings rate of 65%. We have two properties (1 LTR & 1 STR VR). We self manage the VR and will be looking at add more in 2020.

Financial freedom looks different for everyone, but for us it simply means living a life we choose to live, working smarter instead of harder, more quality time together, maximizing our careers to work for us, and putting experiences on top of things. These are our “whys”.

@Erik W.

Following along even further than your example of the complacent workers.... I love my career and don’t need to be “shaken out of” anything. To me real estate investing is another leg of my finances. Making my money work for me means I can do what I want without having to stress as much about what I need. Dream opportunity in another city? A sabbatical to learn a new skill or spend time with my family? Maybe start my own business in my field? Supplemental income from RE can help make any of that happen. In addition it’s insurance against the unforeseen layoff or long term illness. I can take risks I couldn’t otherwise. I don’t love the RE process (tenants, the purchase process, repairs, etc) and prefer my day job.

Originally posted by @Erik W. :

Interesting thread.  I'd like to address a point by @Sarah Brown first, then I'll dive into the OP's specific question.

I think a lot of people actually ARE cut out for being cube farm workers.  These are your typical 8 - 5, 40 hours a week, middle class Americans.  They maybe have a college degree (or not), they like to show up at 8 AM (or 8:05, or 8:10), grab a cup of coffee, swap stories at the water cooler, take an hour lunch (or 1 hour & 15 minutes) while they read a novel or play video games or stream the latest episode of GOT, and clock out at 5 PM (or 4:55), go home and that's their career.  They'll hopefully tuck aside 10% of their income into a 401K in a pre-defined series of stock mutual funds.  they take a 2 week vacation somewhere every year, have two cars on payments most of the time, pay off their mortgage after 30 years that usually includes 2 or 3 refinances to do home improvements and/or send their kids to college.  Then they hope to downsize and retire and enjoy the grand kids and traveling the country in an RV (on payments).

To be clear...there's nothing wrong with that if that's what someone decides.  But we all see what's missing in there: it's a cookie cutter life that is palletized, shrink wrapped, and shipped to someone as a "life" by the Amazons and institutions of modern America. 

But there's no entrepreneurial spirit.  Nothing to really cause one to step outside and take responsibility for one's own life and destiny.  These are the people who complain that "corporations have ruined America" and "the middle class lifestyle is disappearing."  They've never learned what it means to earn a living vs. having a pre-defined plan for living handed to them all pretty with a bow around it.  Again, that's fine if that's all you're fit for.  And for MANY people, that is all they are fit for.  This is the world that the Industrial Revolution and the rise of corporate America has built since the turn of the 19th Century.  It's the factor worker / blue collar career that began in the 1870s and gradually morphed in the 1960s-70s into the corporate American white collar career.

But some of us are weirdos and really want to sink our teeth into life and tear a hunk out of it, chew it up, and see how good it tastes.

100- 400 years ago we would have been pioneers, leaving family, friends, and a known way of life behind to strike it out on a dusty trail that was fraught with peril and no guarantees.  We would have been sailors on ships to "new" lands, frontier farmers scratching out a living, gold miners and prospectors, or rail road builders.  Sadly, the age of explorers and pioneers on this planet has come to an end.  Until Mr. Musk puts us on Mars we have to find something else to do.  Enter...the small business owner / entrepreneur / real estate investor!

We're not satisfied to lead a simple existence, and often times that is frustrating when our efforts achieve no results.  Still, we grind on, knowing there is something amazing about creating the thing that earns one's keep, even if it means following in the perilous footsteps of others.  Pioneers follow the trails of explorers.  Knowing at the end of the day there is no paycheck....no meat to put on the table, unless our conscious effort, will, wisdom, skill, determination, and a dab of good timing all come together to make it so.

That's what the whiners and complainers don't understand.  Wealth doesn't just show up.  It has to be created.  Sure, there are a few lucky (?) ones who get a pile of money dumped at their feet because they were born into a rich family or they won the Lottery, but almost 80% of wealthy Americans are 1st generation rich (The Millionaire Next Door by Dr. Thomas Stanley) meaning they willed that wealth into existence.  They persevered.  They showed up at 5 AM and stayed until 11 PM, unlike the 8-5ers above.  For them, "lunch" is 10 minutes to grab some food and scarf it down while calling vendors, tenants, customers, etc.  Vacations are put on hold for 3-10 years while building up a solid foundation and the business can start to run itself.

I can say the reason I (partially) chose this route is it's coded into my DNA. I have always wanted to know about the inner workings of systems and processes. It's fascinating. I like to build systems and processes...partly why I'm into Info Tech as a day job but thrive on my side-hustle of REI. I like to get my hands "dirty" in the real stuff of life. And I see the rewards are potentially much better for those of us who choose this route than for those who risk nothing other than simply following a path that most other people do.

Millenials may be the first group as a generation to reject the pre-defined life/career trend of the past 100 years more than others, but there's still a long way to go.  Maybe some day more people will find the lure of adventure and reward preferably to 40 years of the daily grind.  Every day is a great day to be a live and do something new and interesting...and hopefully get paid well for it!

America was built on small business and entrepreneurs.. its not everyone's cup of tea of course.. And there is a huge difference between working in a factory or a cube and making the median income for an area which is usually about 50k a year.

And say someone who works in a Cube at Google and makes 250k a year and marries another googler and they make 250k a year working in their cubes.. not all cubes are alike. 

 

Love what @Erik W. and @Sarah Brown . Here's why I keep going and pushing to FF.

I am a year out of high school so quite young. When I was in high school I was quiet and shy. Never pursued or went after interests, goals, or hobbies because I was scared. I didn't push myself. After reading Rich Dad Poor Dad and diving into Real Estate I wanted more in life. I've set a goal to be FF by 25, the regret from being shy at a younger age keeps me going. I won't give up til I make it. Most people live the cookie cutter life and don't change/push themselves. Financial freedom gives you the ability to enjoy the moments, take vacations, buy the toys you always wanted, leave a legacy, and many more. We have 1 life on this Earth and you can't waste it. Keep pushing guys!