Right way to obtain MLS access?

16 Replies

I'm currently looking to get MLS access so that I can use that as another source for leads. What is the best way to: 1. Find and contact a realtor; 2. Establish some credibility and trust; 3. Convince them that we can capitalize off of one another; 4. Get MLS access from them all while being somewhat of a stranger to them.

If anyone else has obtained MLS access another way I'm all ears!

You can try to become a realtors assistant. I would talk to new realtors that are interested in investing. You can talk to him about making it a win/win.

Omari,

Most Realtor associations will not let members share their passwords. Not to say it doesnt happen, but you will most likely have to know a realtor well in order to access data from the MLS.

Mark

@Omari Brown Making a relationship with a realtor and becoming their assistant is the best way. But you need to establish the relationship first and offer them something. I offered my assistance with MLS research when the agent was out on the road doing showings or meeting with clients. It's something they will rarely ask for but you are offering them some value. Secondly you want to offer them the Buyers side of anything you buy off the MLS, this doesn't cost you anything as the seller pays all commissions.

I think finding and building a relationship with an agent/Realtor is best especially if you don't have time to learn how to use it. Just be upfront with what you need but don't be surprised if they charge you.

In my MLS, they fine people $2500 for giving out access. I imagine they track it with IP addresses. The fine is on the person who has the MLS access. So it may be a hard sell to get access.

I don't think MLS tracked their service by IP address because most IP's change each time you reboot your computer.


Joe Gore

Originally posted by @Joe Gore:

I don't think MLS tracked their service by IP address because most IP's change each time you reboot your computer.


Joe Gore

I can confirm the MLS does this. They don't restrict by IP by any means, but they can track it. Keep in mind, it's not WHAT the IP address is that they are tracking. They can track it in many ways. If your IP changes often but it's always in the same "location" and multiple IP's aren't logged in at the same time, you're fine.

Every IP can be "located" instantly. This is how websites can throw local advertisements at you because they know the general area where you are by your Public IP. If you are a realtor that is always logging in from New York, NY, and all of a sudden logins over a long period of time (much longer than a vacation would be) are coming from California, they are going to investigate accordingly. Penalties aren't just assessed, they investigate first and try and find out what's going on. The MLS isn't on a witch hunt or anything. They would only assess a penalty if they think you are being malicious. Simply changing your password can stop behavior you're not aware is happening (like if someone got a hold of your account somehow).

It would also be a flag if the same account is being logged into from several different places across the U.S at the same time (or several different IP's).  For example, if someone is logged in from CA, MS, and TN all at the same time, that will look weird and they will investigate if they know you are located in TN only.

And keep in mind, there isn't a team that is constantly watching this. They can run reports and such from time to time. If someone logged in to your account once or twice from somewhere else, that wouldn't raise any flags. It's prolonged used of your account from multiple places over a long period of time that they are looking for. They are really trying to crack down on gross misuse. Believe it or not, there are people who will "sell" their account to others who can't otherwise get MLS access. These realtors/appraisers are the people the MLS is looking for. My Father is a realtor and when he visits, sometimes he logs into MLS (I'm 1,000 miles away) while he's here and the MLS has never called him on it. If I personally logged in a few times a week (and no I don't have his account info), the MLS would probably call him after a while to find out what's going on.

Hope that clears it up.

@Justin B.,


I do agree with you. Let's say the account holder is in TN, and he let his friend in Florida use the account all the friend in Florida needs to do is use a proxy in TN, and he is all set.


Joe Gore

Not only will MLS fine the Realtor, their is confidential information in the MLS (security system codes, gate codes, key codes, etc...) The liability for this kind of activity extends far beyond a fine from the local MLS board, in my opinion.

Plus in my MLS, if I were to give out my login credentials, it would log me OFF when you accessed. It is a bad idea all around for the Realtor.

Yes I wouldn't ask for someone to give you their login. I agree that being someones assistant and offering them something is a great way to do it. In fact if you know anyone in Arizona who wants to do that let me know ;)

In my MLS system, assistants have their own login, their own account and their own fees. Perhaps you could offer your assistance as an assistant, or just be set up like one. I wouldn't ask anyone for their log in. Good luck!

@Omari Brown The best way to get access to the MLS is first to identify the right realtor. I would look for a younger investor friendly realtor...that is NOT associated with any big named real estate companies, like "Century 21" or "ReMax" because they are generally going to have MUCH stricter standards on such things. So find a smaller non-name brand real estate company.

Then the best way to do #3 & #4 is to make them money. Either having them sell a property you own, or bringing them great deals etc. Then show them how you can continue to make them money, and granting the MLS access will help make them even more money....so they couldn't afford not to grant you MLS access. That's how I did it...it worked for me :)

You do not need MLS to get deals; you need an agent that loves real estate, loves making money, and is a go getter. An agent can search the MLS for the properties you are looking for. He/she can then research the property, send you over the info. Once you have looked over the info you then submit your bid on that property. The key is locking up a property to give you time to inspect and appraise the property. Legally the agent cannot submit offers without a signature from the buyer. Your agent must not be worried with offending other agents or sellers. He/she just needs to explain that they have an investor with an offer on their property and it is not full market price. There is a lot of material online that can go more into depth.

@Dick Rosen   Thanks, I actually met a fairly new realtor today. Im linking up with her next week. She loved the idea of me learning assisting with her team and helping me learn the game. The power of opening your mouth and talking to people!

Get licensed

Originally posted by @Omari Brown:

I'm currently looking to get MLS access so that I can use that as another source for leads. What is the best way to: 1. Find and contact a realtor; 2. Establish some credibility and trust; 3. Convince them that we can capitalize off of one another; 4. Get MLS access from them all while being somewhat of a stranger to them.

If anyone else has obtained MLS access another way I'm all ears!

 Omari,

Perform a google search in your local area for RE agents if you don't have one.  Call the office of choice and speak with the receptionist.  The receptionist will know who to put you in contact with based on what you are looking for.  I always tell the receptionist that I want to speak with a RE agent who works with investors and she puts me in touch with that person. More than likely they will have this person call you back.  Your approach should not be to capitalize off of the RE agent but to work with them to make it a win-win situation for all parties involved (Seller, wholesaler, RE agent and buyer).   When the  agent calls you tell them you want to "buy, fix and sell properties" and give them your criteria (price range, br/ba, location).  Of course, politely introduce yourself first.  A good RE agent is a wealth of information and can get you up to speed quickly in your local area with knowledge about hot areas, buyers, sellers, avg. profits on deals, title companies, attorneys, you name it.  If they can't tell you they probably have connections who can. Finally, know your market and all the investor players in it.  Network with them and find out how you can help them get what they want by asking questions like what areas they invest in, their criteria, price range/profit expected and if they are rehabbing, flipping or holding for rental. Have your financing methods in place and go out make offers on the types of deals that your investor/buyer friends are looking for.  Take the deals to them and make your profit.

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