Does it matter what school you go to?

12 Replies

I am going to get my real estate license and I do not want to pick the wrong school. I am looking at online schools so I can go as fast as I want. Any suggestions from realtors that have gone this route? Or is online classes not the way to go? I really want the most for my money. Thanks in advance for the advice!

Depends.  I took an online class but that was because I was not new to the industry.  In a classroom setting you are able to engage in discussion and ask to clarify something you don't understand.  If you are new to the industry that is what I would do.  Yes, the school also matters but only as it pertains to content and teachers.  I would go with a well known company.  Good luck!

My business partner went with one of the "main" online schools and was livid. It didn't educate him on several things that caused him to retake the state exam. Personally if I was to get mine I would go do it in a classroom. 

I just passed the exam. I went through Keller Williams and watched videos and took notes. I could come and go as I pleased. I got my certificate and then scheduled my exam, giving myself two weeks to study. I find it easier to learn by listening, taking practice exams, using flash cards, and when driving listening to CDs. That approach really helped me, and I passed the exam with flying colors after about. 2 hours max. The course was $175, the book $35. Shop around. Find what works for you.

Thanks so much for asking this! Was curious myself as to which route would be best. Definitely thinking the classroom is the way to go!

I only take online classes for the CE.

When I went to study for my real estate license I was in a classroom (it's required in Ohio), but I feel it's the way to go because of the connections you could make.  Never know who you're going to meet.

I'm taking the home study course through Kaplan right now, simply read the books and take the open book exams at the end of the three courses.  I'll probably do some practice tests and some vocabulary study before the state exam.  I think it all depends on the Individual learning style, I personally would pay significantly more to not have to sit in classes. I rarely sat in a class in college because of the absolute boredom and the requirement to go at the pace needed for the "slowest" person in the room and I still managed a Doctorate.  I joke with my daughter that I majored in "game room" in college, could have went pro in Ping Pong or Foosball after graduation lol. Why sit in class for hours listening to an instructor deliver the same material I can read in 10 minutes? For me, no thanks.  Kaplan cost me $238.

Wow, the lowest Kaplan price I have seen is $499.99. Must be different from state to state. I'm with you on the sitting in class thing. I'll eventually get a degree but I absolutely can't do the slow pace and boring professors.

Originally posted by @Taylor Haywood :

Wow, the lowest Kaplan price I have seen is $499.99. Must be different from state to state. I'm with you on the sitting in class thing. I'll eventually get a degree but I absolutely can't do the slow pace and boring professors.

 I did the lowest cost one on the right here: http://www.kapre.com/real-estate-courses/californi...

Now, I may pay a few bucks to get some sort of test review information, I haven't looked around to see what's available yet but I'll have plenty of time between finishing these classes and being able to sit for the test.

It is more in Texas because they require 60 hours, but this is the school I think I'm going to pay for. Let us all know when you pass. @Lee S.

These things just teach you how to hopefully pass the state test.

You learn the craft out in the real world. 90% of the getting the license stuff you will not use day to day.

A lot of it is obscure stuff that test creators deem important on a national and local level. If you take an in class school the instructor usually has past students give an idea on what is on the current tests for types of questions.  

Originally posted by @Joel Owens :

These things just teach you how to hopefully pass the state test.

You learn the craft out in the real world. 90% of the getting the license stuff you will not use day to day.

A lot of it is obscure stuff that test creators deem important on a national and local level. If you take an in class school the instructor usually has past students give an idea on what is on the current tests for types of questions.  

 Couldn't agree more.  This brings me back to my thoughts on college education, it's not a measure of intelligence it's a measure of effort.  I think just about anyone can get an RE license, the bar is extremely low.  The opposite is true for how many people will be successful as an Agent/Broker if that is their primary goal.  I'll try to remember to report back if I pass :)

What you learn matters, not where you learn it from.

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