Florida General Contractors (GC)

9 Replies

Hi,

I'm looking at the Florida license web site. Anyone used this?

www.myfloridalicense.com

I looked up a few names to verify if any complaints have been lodged. 

Based on the title, does Certified Residential Contractor in any way mean "General Contractor".

How can I tell if the person is a GC versus a regular contractor.

There doesn't seem to be a way to search for 'general contractor'.

Thanks

I got my answer already....I don't know about other states but FL breaks it up to specific license type so if the license doesn't have 'General' in the text of the title then I don't think they are - I found several that did - 'Certified General Contractor'.

Yes, CGC is a General Contractor.  A Building Contractor is fine, they're just restricted to under 4 stories on new construction.

Originally posted by @Wayne Brooks :

Yes, CGC is a General Contractor.  A Building Contractor is fine, they're just restricted to under 4 stories on new construction.

 Thanks. Do you know the difference between "registeted" and "general"? They don't have a dictionary on the site and these are in the drop down.

I think I need general though to manage and bring other qualified skills to the project. Likely I will find a specific contractor / company to do HVAC, roof, windows while the GC manages and does the smaller items like interiors.

"Registered" means they are not licensed Statewide as a GC, they must pass local (county) testing to be licensed in that specific county.

Originally posted by @Daria B. :

Hi,

I'm looking at the Florida license web site. Anyone used this?

www.myfloridalicense.com

I looked up a few names to verify if any complaints have been lodged. 

Based on the title, does Certified Residential Contractor in any way mean "General Contractor".

How can I tell if the person is a GC versus a regular contractor.

There doesn't seem to be a way to search for 'general contractor'.

Thanks

Registered vs Certified is if their license in through the state, or local municipality.

There are 3 classes, General (GC), Builder (BC) and Residential (RC).  The R or C the will be before any of those numbers is just if they are certified or registered, both are legal and good, certified is harder to get and maintain.

Residential can only work on residential properties, under 2 inhabitable stories.

Builder can do the same up to 3 stories (I believe) and limited commercial work

General can do just about any and everything they want

Building Contractor and General Contractor are very very close.  10 more questions on the state licensing test, and more expensive insurance for General Contractor.  

Three stories and less for us Building Contractors.  I have been able to do everything I have been asked by my customers, from Moe's Restaraunts to free standing commercial buildings. 

Hello,

In Florida (Palm Beach County).  As far as remodeling goes of a condominium.  If a condo building is 4 stories can a "Residential" Contractor do an interior (non-structural) remodel?  Or does the 4 stories mandate a "General" contractor.  Or does the stories requirement only apply for new construction?

I ask because I want to be my own GC on flips of some condos and want to get my license.  I am hoping to get a license through reciprocity.  I have loads of experience.  Connecticut did not require a license to GC properties you own.  You obviously had to get licensed electricians and plumbers.  I can get letters from multiple building inspectors and  different trades.  Hopefully I can convince the board, but I wanted to go for the lowest level of experience (Residential).  But I want to make sure I could accomplish my goals (renovate a condo).

Thanks,

Bob

@Bob Chapin Have you done any flips or rehabs here in Palm Beach County yet?