boarded up!

14 Replies

I've come across a particular property while I run through the neighborhood that is completely boarded up with trespasser signs posted as well. I checked the county assessor and the place is current on their taxes with no active listing, to my knowledge since I do not have MLS access.

Does this happen? Why would someone abandon the property yet pay the property taxes? Also curious if anyone may know a way of pursuing a way of purchasing the place.

Derek: I'll make you the same offer as Amber in the other thread. Send me the address and I'll check to see what's going on with the property. I have a lot of national data, but it's more complete for CA, AZ and NV.

All you newbies: get yourself an online account with a title companies or subscribe to paid online data services. This stuff takes 2 minutes. That way you don't waste time fantasizing about properties you won't be buying. :)

I have done that. It's usually because I am out of state or country and either waiting for the market to get better or simply to get the plans and approvals that are needed. I personally have had a house boarded up since last year and just about to get it started. It happens but always investigate but I agree with k Marie- don't start dreaming just yet.

Originally posted by @Derek Smith :Why would someone abandon the property yet pay the property taxes? Also curious if anyone may know a way of pursuing a way of purchasing the place.

It happens all the time. The owner could have abandoned the property but the bank is paying the taxes. Also an owner could hope that "someday" they will fix it up so they do the min. like paying taxes to keep ownership.

Often the best choice for these owners is to sell the property and stop the slow bleeding. You purchase this like any house contact the owner and see if they want to sell. Negotiate a price and do the deal.

The hard part is often finding the owner. Also many owners who should be motivated are not.

What you have is a vacant property that is boarded up. There's no other clues to suggest it's abandoned.

Better to think in terms of orphan houses. This has been my term for many years to describe a property that is vacant, neglected, and shows no sign of anyone taking active interest or responsibility for its maintenance. This means that taxes are delinquent or defaulted, no transfers of ownership in the last 18-24 months and no voluntary liens such as mortgages recorded in the same period.

Of course, this still doesn't mean that there's a deal to be had if there's no catalyst to motivate a seller to trade equity in return for solving a problem. I once got scolded by my buddy (Cantu ) when I drove him around one morning and showed him 5-7 vacant houses that I hadn't gotten around to doing anything with. It drove him to distraction, and I finally started rehabbing them just so we wouldn't have to talk about them every time we went out for sushi.

Great info everyone! @Nicole Holmes I would've never thought someone would hold a property, board it up, and then wait for the market to turn around.

In either case, through mine and with some help thanks to

Kristine Marie Poe , I have the owner's mailing address. I will be mailing out a letter this weekend. I also read in a prior post that an investor once wanted to purchase a bank owned property so he contacted the bank and knowing how small the office was included a picture of his family. I don't have a full family per say, but I'll be sending a photo regardless of my girlfriend and I, we'll see if our attempt has different results. Finally, here is word for word the letter being sent out. I plan on giving it 2-3 weeks before I forget about it.

Dear Homeowner, (will be replaced with real name)

First off, if you are reading this letter my girlfriend and I would like to thank you for taking a moment out of your day to do so.

Second, we wanted to inquire about the property you own on (actual property address). We are currently renting in the same area and absolutely love the community! Recently we have also decided to no longer rent and would like to take pride in becoming homeowners, which is why we are writing you this letter. The property appears to be abandoned as it is boarded up. Using the property address to search our local county records we found your mailing address and were curious if you may be interested in selling this home. As we mentioned before, we adore the area for the people, places, and relativity closeness to work. With notations of starting a family, we feel this would be perfect opportunity to have a fresh being able to fix this house up into our dream home that will go beyond our needs and extend into what our future family will need.

Again, if this may be a possibility we would love to discuss any options in greater detail. Below you will ind out contact information if you wish to reach out. Finally, we truly appreciate your time and consideration on the matter, thank you!

Warmly,

signed by the girlfriend and myself

also to include all avenues to contact me.


I will update this post regardless in a matter of weeks to let everyone know if we had any success.

Derek - cut out about 2/3 of your letter's text, anything not essential

Focus on them not you.

Ask yourself this question when proof reading:

"If I was the recipient, why should I care? What's in it for me? What can Derek do that I or someone else cannot?"

@Rick H. Thanks for the suggestion. As I continue to mull over the possible scenarios of writing the letter I will take that into deep consideration.

Primarily I choose more of a "me" route is based off what I know about my audience.

What I know is she is an elderly with high probability of children, not currently married; possibly widowed, so. I am looking to relate to her on a personal level. More than likely experienced this exact phase in her life. Building a rapport through shared experiences can be a powerful motivator (or so we hope given we do not know her full story).

Finally, perhaps the answer to the question of, "What can Derek do for me?" Is buying this lonely home from her so she can stop bleeding out money. Maybe? Lol.

Originally posted by @Derek Smith :
@Rick H. Thanks for the suggestion. As I continue to mull over the possible scenarios of writing the letter I will take that into deep consideration.
Primarily I choose more of a "me" route is based off what I know about my audience.

What I know is she is an elderly with high probability of children, not currently married; possibly widowed, so. I am looking to relate to her on a personal level. More than likely experienced this exact phase in her life. Building a rapport through shared experiences can be a powerful motivator (or so we hope given we do not know her full story).

Finally, perhaps the answer to the question of, "What can Derek do for me?" Is buying this lonely home from her so she can stop bleeding out money. Maybe? Lol.

Did you get my message? The owner is most definitely a widow.

I agree with Rick. Make it super short and go with "you" as opposed to "I" as much as possible. You can sell the property quickly and easily, you won't have to make any repairs, etc. DON'T say things like the property appears to be abandoned. That was the owner's primary residence for decades. You have no idea what kind of negativity that kind of comment can generate. Not to mention paranoia now that they know people are driving by and that the property is calling attention to itself.

I don't agree with you - the personal touch makes for a possible emotional connection. If the seller doesn't get that - no harm done - the buyer still gets the message that you want to buy. But I have found that sitting down with someone and having tea while talking about how much I love their home has several times paid benefits beyond even My imagination. Some people love their house and want to sell it to someone who will feel the same way about it.

What can this sweet buyer do for me that someone else can't do? Why they will love and appreciate my house the way I have. And I care about that more than anything - even money.

Sure it's all business to you and I - but rubbing that in their face doesn't always pay the best dividends.

stephen
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Originally posted by @Rick H. :
Derek - cut out about 2/3 of your letter's text, anything not essential

Focus on them not you.

Ask yourself this question when proof reading:

"If I was the recipient, why should I care? What's in it for me? What can Derek do that I or someone else cannot?"

I'm a little late to this, but as a senior myself, I thought I'd toss in my 2 cents (we aren't all alike, either. lol) Especially in dealing with seniors remember the greater number of years over which the person has acquired "buttons..." (Life experiences that trigger various emotions, biases, etc.) You and your "girlfriend" starting a family? Hmmmm. You see her as having "abandoned" her house when maybe a heartbreaking illness made it impossible to live there alone. You look forward to making changes in it. You don't like it the way it is? The way she loved it? See where I'm going?

I agree with points made on both sides of the discussion, actually. I agree with you that often money is not all important to a seller. "Connection"with a buyer may very well make all the difference. I would definitely tell her how much you love her house and would be interested in buying it If she would consider selling. That should get you a response if she does want/need to sell.

Save the personal information for a conversation wherein you have listened, listened, listened to her and can make a connection on actual common grounds. Sharing personal information with someone you've never even met in like walking thru a mine field. Trigger a negative memory or emotion and you will never know why the choose not to deal with you.

@Barbara Riley

Thank you for you valued input! Better late than never ;)

I definitely see where you're coming from with the changes to the house, although given the fact it is boarded up, the owner would have to assume some renovations would take place. I will say the reasons behind the abandonment may be family related which would cause my approach to fall extremely short.

In either case, I may never know the reasons why, yet as of today I have not received any response back. I personally found this experience to be exciting and packed full of value. I may never acquire a deal through this channel, but at this point I am not 100% convinced that it won't happen. So it'll be interesting how I alter my approach on the next boarded up house.

Thanks to everyone who offered their feedback, it has been greatly appreciated!

Try a re-contact. I would love to hear that you got a response, and a deal! It could still happen!

K. Marie Poe

 Hi Kristine,

What is a good skip tracing service? i'm looking at ussearch and peoplefinder, deciding to pick one to sign up with, is there a better service out there?

i'm basically finding abandoned housed which I am finding that the mail to address is also the property address in propertyradar

thank you in advance

found the answer, thank you anyways:)

Accurint from Lexus Nexus.

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