Starting a fund, advice needed

3 Replies

I have heard in various podcast episodes about how the speakers started a fund and would go to events to raise money. Is there anywhere I can learn more about this? I am looking to set something like this up and wondering how to go about doing it, ( I am also based in the UK but there is even less info here so I will start by learning the US way)

Thanks

Originally posted by @Harry Wilson :

I have heard in various podcast episodes about how the speakers started a fund and would go to events to raise money. Is there anywhere I can learn more about this? I am looking to set something like this up and wondering how to go about doing it, ( I am also based in the UK but there is even less info here so I will start by learning the US way)

Thanks

 I'd talk to a SEC lawyer first, learn the rules and regulations of raising money in the US. Laws may vary by state so wherever you start make sure you're in accordance to their law. Then, I'd form an entity which your lawyer and you will cover. Get good at public speaking and throwing events, social media presence, and hangout with rich people. Tada, only if doing it was as easy as typing it. Good luck.

There are three ways you can build your list through events: Speaking, Sponsoring a Table, and attending/networking. 

Speaking is by far the most effective. Get on stage, give value, and give people a reason to talk to you later.

Tables can work to build your list, but you have to really work it. It's not a build it and they will come scenario. You have to be engaged, talking to people, looking like you have all the energy in the world. It's not an easy thing to do over the course of a long event.

Lastly, you can raise capital by networking at events. This is difficult. Depending on who you ask, real estate events might not be the best place to do so. I have made connections that turned into investors in my deals at such events, but it takes a lot of work.

It's going to be tough if you don't have experience raising money for individual deals. Having a track record is tremendously beneficial, particularly if you're raising for a blind fund.

Follow up, follow up, follow up!