Question about lot size

11 Replies

There’s a small house on my street on 80x100 lot. 8000 sqft on a corner street. No neighboring home on the left side. Only neighbor’s house is on the right and another one back of the house. How big of a house can I build on this lot if I demo the current home and build a new foundation? New construction has been built in the same street with 2900sqft homes on 100x100 lot 10,000 sqft. Thank you

You would have to find out the zoning requirements. You can find this online, or at the town hall

Thanks all. Found out from the town that 20% of the total square footage can be used for the home. Is this example, 1600 sqft for first floor and another 1600 sqft for second floor. Total 3200 sqft home
@Kal Saeed make sure you check clearance as well. For example you may need a certain amount of feet between the end of the lot line to the foundation.

@Kal Saeed I have twice designed new homes to be built on old foundations. You may wish to consider this strategy for at least part of the house (you can add to it). Demo and new concrete are expensive... In both cases I needed a letter from an engineer stating that the foundation was thick enough and sturdy enough for my plan. But still WAY cheaper than starting over... 

You need to check not only the lot usage percentage but yard requirements (side, front, rear) as well as floor area ratio or max square footage, max height, and possibly other things before really determining the size house which can be built. @Kal Saeed  

Originally posted by @Kal Saeed :
Thanks all. Found out from the town that 20% of the total square footage can be used for the home. Is this example, 1600 sqft for first floor and another 1600 sqft for second floor. Total 3200 sqft home

Ask the city if they mean footprint/lot coverage (yes 3200 sf) OR floor area ratio (1600 sf only).

Originally posted by @Teri S.:

@Kal Saeed I have twice designed new homes to be built on old foundations. You may wish to consider this strategy for at least part of the house (you can add to it). Demo and new concrete are expensive... In both cases I needed a letter from an engineer stating that the foundation was thick enough and sturdy enough for my plan. But still WAY cheaper than starting over... 

Yes, this can be a huge time saver especially if your jurisdiction considers this an "addition" instead of a "new construction" which generally makes it easier and faster to get a permit.