Wholesalers Getting a Bad Rep

11 Replies

Ok...so...I'm a little beside myself. But I've got to get this off my chest.

I'm seeing more and more posts about bad wholesalers. And all of the posts have various stories about how people are being jilted by bad wholesalers. I get it, there are bad wholesalers out there. But those of us that are good...or are trying to be good (and land that first deal) are now judged because of what sellers have read on social media. That angers me a little bit. 

In my opinion, you cannot and I repeat, you cannot judge a book by its cover. I never solicit cash buyers...for the simple fact that there are some that will go to any length to destroy what is a legit business; because of pre-judgments and "protecting their commissions."

If there are any other wholesalers (or anyone else for that matter) out there that reads this, your thoughts? I need to get a thorough understanding of investors feelings on this topic.

.....aaaaand....GO!

@Andy Cross I appreciate you wanting to get an understanding of others thoughts, however; this seems like every week there is a BP trending thread regarding this similar topic. Go back in the forums and read up on it.. Best of luck.

Explain completely and honestly to the seller what you are doing, avoid any actions that constitute unlicensed brokerage, and actually learn something about real estate, and no one will have any problem with you.

Not even me, and I am as "anti-wholesaler" as it gets on this site.

Is it possible to be completely honest with sellers about what you are doing?  It absolutely is.  Will it cost you some deals?  Absolutely.  But if you have to lie to get deals, you really aren't bringing much in the way of knowledge or skill to the transaction anyway.

Is it possible to avoid any actions that constitute unlicensed brokerage?  This one is harder.  Yes, it is, but the vast, overwhelming majority of wholesalers do not or can not.  For example, if what you have to sell is a house, you are brokering without a license.  If what you have to sell is a contract, then what you can show prospective buyers is...wait for it...a contract.  If you are showing buyers through a home, you're brokering.

Is it possible to learn real estate.  Yes, but not by looking for sources that will teach you wholesaling.  Go take a real estate licensing class.

Now as to your statements in your post.  You don't solicit cash buyers?  Huh?  Then how do you make money?  Of course you solicit cash buyers.  And that is actually one of the few things wholesalers do that I have no problem with.  That is just a bizarre statement.

Will some "go to any lengths to destroy what is a legitimate business?"  No.  I have said on other threads, I am going to report any and all wholesalers to my state REC.  But if they are in fact engaged in a legitimate business, that will not destroy them at all.  The REC will look at my report, shrug their shoulders, and say, "That's a legitimate business."  Coming to the attention of the REC should not concern you unless you are in fact NOT running a legitimate business.

As far as the "protecting commissions" nonsense:  I am not an agent.  I have never made a commission on a real estate sale.  Ever.  So get over the idea that the only reason people might find wholesaling as most do it objectionable is that their personal incomes are threatened.  You don't have to be a banker to think that payday lenders are sleazy, or a paving contractor to think that Travelers preying on elderly people with paving scams are sleazy.  And make no mistake, wholesaling as it is taught by the gurus and pursued by all too many on here is bottom feeding, the equivalent of payday loans.

There are good wholesalers.  You can recognize them because they ADD value.  If you are not ADDING value, then any money you receive is value you have unjustly taken from someone else.  So wholesalers sending thousands of pieces of direct mail a month, and running real businesses finding leads of people willing to sell who hadn't actually listed yet?  No problem.  Those people are adding value, ease for the seller and inventory for buyers, and so they are entitled to get some of that value back as compensation.  You just find some old lady who doesn't know any better?  You let her think she cannot sell with a Realtor because her house needs repairs?  You tie her house up, with no ability or intention to buy it yourself if you cannot find a buyer?  Then you are not ADDING value, and whatever money you make was stolen from that old lady.

So there is the bottom line.  Be open and honest about what you do.  Don't broker without a license.  Learn enough (and frankly, spend enough) that you are adding value rather than stealing it.  Do those things, and you're golden.

Now, let me ask a question in return.  Why not just get a license?  Seriously.  No wannabe wholesaler has ever had a credible answer to that question.  So why?

@Andy Cross I agree with you that wholesalers are indeed getting a bad rap on social media as well as forum posts. I am by no means an expert on the subject, so experienced BP members, please correct me if I am mistaken.

When trying to understand it myself, I found that wholesalers get a bad rep for similar reasons that give many used car salesman a bad rap, the first priority always appears to be money before good service. 

Although wholesaling is a legitimate business, there tends to be a trend of terminating the sales contract before the inspection period is over if the wholesaler does not find a buyer for the house. This of course leaves a bad taste in the mouth of those involved due to the time wasted.

I'm sure there are good wholesalers out there, just as I believe there are good car salesmen, but it's the bad ones that ruin it for all of us.

Here is an example of the typical bad experiences when dealing with wholesalers for those of you that are just catching up to the subject:

http://www.biggerpockets.com/forums/48/topics/2284...

Originally posted by @Richard C. :

Explain completely and honestly to the seller what you are doing, avoid any actions that constitute unlicensed brokerage, and actually learn something about real estate, and no one will have any problem with you.

Not even me, and I am as "anti-wholesaler" as it gets on this site.

Is it possible to be completely honest with sellers about what you are doing?  It absolutely is.  Will it cost you some deals?  Absolutely.  But if you have to lie to get deals, you really aren't bringing much in the way of knowledge or skill to the transaction anyway.

Is it possible to avoid any actions that constitute unlicensed brokerage?  This one is harder.  Yes, it is, but the vast, overwhelming majority of wholesalers do not or can not.  For example, if what you have to sell is a house, you are brokering without a license.  If what you have to sell is a contract, then what you can show prospective buyers is...wait for it...a contract.  If you are showing buyers through a home, you're brokering.

Is it possible to learn real estate.  Yes, but not by looking for sources that will teach you wholesaling.  Go take a real estate licensing class.

Now as to your statements in your post.  You don't solicit cash buyers?  Huh?  Then how do you make money?  Of course you solicit cash buyers.  And that is actually one of the few things wholesalers do that I have no problem with.  That is just a bizarre statement.

Will some "go to any lengths to destroy what is a legitimate business?"  No.  I have said on other threads, I am going to report any and all wholesalers to my state REC.  But if they are in fact engaged in a legitimate business, that will not destroy them at all.  The REC will look at my report, shrug their shoulders, and say, "That's a legitimate business."  Coming to the attention of the REC should not concern you unless you are in fact NOT running a legitimate business.

As far as the "protecting commissions" nonsense:  I am not an agent.  I have never made a commission on a real estate sale.  Ever.  So get over the idea that the only reason people might find wholesaling as most do it objectionable is that their personal incomes are threatened.  You don't have to be a banker to think that payday lenders are sleazy, or a paving contractor to think that Travelers preying on elderly people with paving scams are sleazy.  And make no mistake, wholesaling as it is taught by the gurus and pursued by all too many on here is bottom feeding, the equivalent of payday loans.

There are good wholesalers.  You can recognize them because they ADD value.  If you are not ADDING value, then any money you receive is value you have unjustly taken from someone else.  So wholesalers sending thousands of pieces of direct mail a month, and running real businesses finding leads of people willing to sell who hadn't actually listed yet?  No problem.  Those people are adding value, ease for the seller and inventory for buyers, and so they are entitled to get some of that value back as compensation.  You just find some old lady who doesn't know any better?  You let her think she cannot sell with a Realtor because her house needs repairs?  You tie her house up, with no ability or intention to buy it yourself if you cannot find a buyer?  Then you are not ADDING value, and whatever money you make was stolen from that old lady.

So there is the bottom line.  Be open and honest about what you do.  Don't broker without a license.  Learn enough (and frankly, spend enough) that you are adding value rather than stealing it.  Do those things, and you're golden.

Now, let me ask a question in return.  Why not just get a license?  Seriously.  No wannabe wholesaler has ever had a credible answer to that question.  So why?

Hey Richard...I do appreciate you being candid in your response to my post. And it helps me understand where/why or how there could be such dissension.

Where do I begin...

Let's start on the last thing I read. Why not get a realtors license? Bottom line, not interested. I'm not interested in what realtors do (door knocking, taking people to look at houses, "protecting my commission," etc.) I do not plan on wholesaling forever. I'm "crawling before I can walk," just until I have enough capital to buy houses cash and flip for a profit. That is it.

Soliciting cash buyers? No, I do not solicit cash buyers that have not asked to be solicited. I have a list of cash buyers that I have personally spoken to, and I know what they want. I obtained those cash buyers by marketing my wholesaling business; and they reached out to me to be informed of deals they fit their criteria. If I get a deal, I'm marking to my list...not cash buyers I do not know. Make sense?

What's to gain from reporting ANY and ALL wholesalers to your state REC? Is that a way of weeding out the bad ones? I'm only asking to get a better understanding of "why." 

The "protecting commissions" statement was for those posts and responses I have read here on BP from commission based professionals upset with wholesalers for what they do. Not you in particular. So, until something changes in their thinking, I will continue to feel that they are "protecting their commission."

Originally posted by @Andrew Zwicker :

@Andy Cross I agree with you that wholesalers are indeed getting a bad rap on social media as well as forum posts. I am by no means an expert on the subject, so experienced BP members, please correct me if I am mistaken.

When trying to understand it myself, I found that wholesalers get a bad rep for similar reasons that give many used car salesman a bad rap, the first priority always appears to be money before good service. 

Although wholesaling is a legitimate business, there tends to be a trend of terminating the sales contract before the inspection period is over if the wholesaler does not find a buyer for the house. This of course leaves a bad taste in the mouth of those involved due to the time wasted.

I'm sure there are good wholesalers out there, just as I believe there are good car salesmen, but it's the bad ones that ruin it for all of us.

Here is an example of the typical bad experiences when dealing with wholesalers for those of you that are just catching up to the subject:

http://www.biggerpockets.com/forums/48/topics/2284...

 Hey Andrew....thanks for your response and directing me to the post. 

Here's my thing...if no cash buyers will buy the contract...then it wasn't a good deal in the first place. That is what I learned, and has stuck with me. Not only that, why try to sell a contract to a cash buyer if it doesn't fit their criteria. That's like me trying to sell a contact for a house in Beverly Hills to a cash buyer that can only afford to invest in a much lower housing market. Makes no sense! 

But to say ALL wholesalers are questionable raises an eyebrow with me. Which is why I posted this in the forums.

Originally posted by @Andy Cross :
Originally posted by @Richard C.:

Explain completely and honestly to the seller what you are doing, avoid any actions that constitute unlicensed brokerage, and actually learn something about real estate, and no one will have any problem with you.

Not even me, and I am as "anti-wholesaler" as it gets on this site.

Is it possible to be completely honest with sellers about what you are doing?  It absolutely is.  Will it cost you some deals?  Absolutely.  But if you have to lie to get deals, you really aren't bringing much in the way of knowledge or skill to the transaction anyway.

Is it possible to avoid any actions that constitute unlicensed brokerage?  This one is harder.  Yes, it is, but the vast, overwhelming majority of wholesalers do not or can not.  For example, if what you have to sell is a house, you are brokering without a license.  If what you have to sell is a contract, then what you can show prospective buyers is...wait for it...a contract.  If you are showing buyers through a home, you're brokering.

Is it possible to learn real estate.  Yes, but not by looking for sources that will teach you wholesaling.  Go take a real estate licensing class.

Now as to your statements in your post.  You don't solicit cash buyers?  Huh?  Then how do you make money?  Of course you solicit cash buyers.  And that is actually one of the few things wholesalers do that I have no problem with.  That is just a bizarre statement.

Will some "go to any lengths to destroy what is a legitimate business?"  No.  I have said on other threads, I am going to report any and all wholesalers to my state REC.  But if they are in fact engaged in a legitimate business, that will not destroy them at all.  The REC will look at my report, shrug their shoulders, and say, "That's a legitimate business."  Coming to the attention of the REC should not concern you unless you are in fact NOT running a legitimate business.

As far as the "protecting commissions" nonsense:  I am not an agent.  I have never made a commission on a real estate sale.  Ever.  So get over the idea that the only reason people might find wholesaling as most do it objectionable is that their personal incomes are threatened.  You don't have to be a banker to think that payday lenders are sleazy, or a paving contractor to think that Travelers preying on elderly people with paving scams are sleazy.  And make no mistake, wholesaling as it is taught by the gurus and pursued by all too many on here is bottom feeding, the equivalent of payday loans.

There are good wholesalers.  You can recognize them because they ADD value.  If you are not ADDING value, then any money you receive is value you have unjustly taken from someone else.  So wholesalers sending thousands of pieces of direct mail a month, and running real businesses finding leads of people willing to sell who hadn't actually listed yet?  No problem.  Those people are adding value, ease for the seller and inventory for buyers, and so they are entitled to get some of that value back as compensation.  You just find some old lady who doesn't know any better?  You let her think she cannot sell with a Realtor because her house needs repairs?  You tie her house up, with no ability or intention to buy it yourself if you cannot find a buyer?  Then you are not ADDING value, and whatever money you make was stolen from that old lady.

So there is the bottom line.  Be open and honest about what you do.  Don't broker without a license.  Learn enough (and frankly, spend enough) that you are adding value rather than stealing it.  Do those things, and you're golden.

Now, let me ask a question in return.  Why not just get a license?  Seriously.  No wannabe wholesaler has ever had a credible answer to that question.  So why?

Hey Richard...I do appreciate you being candid in your response to my post. And it helps me understand where/why or how there could be such dissension.

Where do I begin...

Let's start on the last thing I read. Why not get a realtors license? Bottom line, not interested. I'm not interested in what realtors do (door knocking, taking people to look at houses, "protecting my commission," etc.) I do not plan on wholesaling forever. I'm "crawling before I can walk," just until I have enough capital to buy houses cash and flip for a profit. That is it.

Soliciting cash buyers? No, I do not solicit cash buyers that have not asked to be solicited. I have a list of cash buyers that I have personally spoken to, and I know what they want. I obtained those cash buyers by marketing my wholesaling business; and they reached out to me to be informed of deals they fit their criteria. If I get a deal, I'm marking to my list...not cash buyers I do not know. Make sense?

What's to gain from reporting ANY and ALL wholesalers to your state REC? Is that a way of weeding out the bad ones? I'm only asking to get a better understanding of "why." 

The "protecting commissions" statement was for those posts and responses I have read here on BP from commission based professionals upset with wholesalers for what they do. Not you in particular. So, until something changes in their thinking, I will continue to feel that they are "protecting their commission."

 With respect, the fact that you say you want to wholesale because you don't want to do what a realtor does is proof that you don't know all that much about the real estate industry.  Because wholesalers and Realtors do exactly the same thing.  The only difference is the mechanism by which they get paid.  And a license and a code of ethics, of course.  But they perform the same function.

As for reporting any and all wholesalers, what I gain is keeping bad actors out of the industry, and keeping them from victimizing sellers.  The vast, overwhelming majority of wholesalers are brokering without a license, which is illegal in every state and a felony in some.  A very very few will fall within some exemption, but the REC can figure that out.  At the very least, the wholesalers I report will likely receive a cease and desist letter.  That will keep them from ever getting a license as a real estate agent or broker, a mortgage loan originator, and in many states, a general contractor.  Further protecting the public by keeping bad actors out.

I wrote in my post about why people be "upset" with wholesalers for reasons that have nothing to do with protecting commissions.  To be perfectly frank, the typical wholesaler is no threat at all to the typical licensed broker.  The brokers simply know far, far more about real estate, they are backed by a powerful industry association, enjoy the blessing and backing of the law and regulators, and are able to operate openly.  You don't threaten their commissions.  You poison the well by victimizing sellers.  There is a difference.

I strongly encourage you to learn real estate.  Not real estate wholesaling, but real estate.  At the very least, learning real estate will give you a chance to be one of the very, very few wholesalers who add value and operate legally.  And it is entirely possible that learning real estate will mean that you realize you don't need to hang out on the fringes of the industry.

One very simple rule.  Just one.  If you say you are buying a house, BUY IT.  The whole, "If I couldn't assign it, it wasn't a deal anyway" thing is self-justifying BS.  Who cares if it was "a deal" that left meat on the bone to pay a middleman?  Not the seller, that is for sure.  You offered to buy their house.  They accepted.  They may very well take actions in reliance on that (like putting a deposit on an apartment, or another house.  Or changing their kids school.  Or giving notice at a job.)  And then you come along and cancel, using some BS contingency clause, because, "it wasn't a deal."  That is a crappy thing to do to someone, and most wholesalers do it routinely.

No, I'm going to report any and all wholesalers.  The tiny minority who are operating legitimately have nothing to fear from this.  The rest will be washed out of the industry, as they should be.

@Richard C. @Andy Cross  Awesome post Richard.... and of course we are of like mind on each and every point you raise.

Andy when you say you only want to do this long enough to get cash.. this reeks of someone who is not interested in the industry as a career and just looking for a cheap money grab... its folks like this that we don't need representing or trying to tie up sellers properties... its very much akin to the paving schemes and traveling contractor schemes... just hit quick and leave.

when you do get posts on BP from some of the top wholesalers you will realize they are also licensed RE brokers... 

Andy, if wholesaling the way most wholesalers do it.. IE tie up property stick it on Craig's list with pic's and all or on their websites ... then why even have a licensed RE industry at all we would just all run around doing what we wanted  Like the old days.. and like present day China which requires no licensing. 

But most countries have these laws and every state has the laws.. Its only with the advent of the internet Guru's and what is promulgated even here on BP that it gives folks the false sense of security that wholesaling is some sort of industry or career path. 

And in fact your statements are very common... People are fed this BS  hey if you have limited resources then wholesale until you get enough cash that you can buy and hold or flip.. When in fact if you wanted to flip just find a good money partner and by pass all the wholesaling BS  find the money partner CLOSE on your wholesale deals fix and flip them and make money like the rest of the industry... Wholesaling without a license is raising a lot of Ire with certain states.. we see that now on BP  Ohio , FLA, CA ,,, I had a client in MS that got a cease and desist in 04 for not owning properties he was reselling and I created a transactional model that kept him legal  IE he owned what he sold.. 

think it through past the short term money grab.. if these deals are good enough to flip off to a rehabber even after your wholesale fee whatever it maybe .. close on it rehab and resell..  share the profit with your money partner. you will make as much if not more you will gain experience and a relationship with a money source... and be legal in all states except WI which requires a license

Originally posted by @Jay Hinrichs :

@Richard C. @Andy Cross  Awesome post Richard.... and of course we are of like mind on each and every point you raise.

Andy when you say you only want to do this long enough to get cash.. this reeks of someone who is not interested in the industry as a career and just looking for a cheap money grab... its folks like this that we don't need representing or trying to tie up sellers properties... its very much akin to the paving schemes and traveling contractor schemes... just hit quick and leave.

when you do get posts on BP from some of the top wholesalers you will realize they are also licensed RE brokers... 

Andy, if wholesaling the way most wholesalers do it.. IE tie up property stick it on Craig's list with pic's and all or on their websites ... then why even have a licensed RE industry at all we would just all run around doing what we wanted  Like the old days.. and like present day China which requires no licensing. 

But most countries have these laws and every state has the laws.. Its only with the advent of the internet Guru's and what is promulgated even here on BP that it gives folks the false sense of security that wholesaling is some sort of industry or career path. 

And in fact your statements are very common... People are fed this BS  hey if you have limited resources then wholesale until you get enough cash that you can buy and hold or flip.. When in fact if you wanted to flip just find a good money partner and by pass all the wholesaling BS  find the money partner CLOSE on your wholesale deals fix and flip them and make money like the rest of the industry... Wholesaling without a license is raising a lot of Ire with certain states.. we see that now on BP  Ohio , FLA, CA ,,, I had a client in MS that got a cease and desist in 04 for not owning properties he was reselling and I created a transactional model that kept him legal  IE he owned what he sold.. 

think it through past the short term money grab.. if these deals are good enough to flip off to a rehabber even after your wholesale fee whatever it maybe .. close on it rehab and resell..  share the profit with your money partner. you will make as much if not more you will gain experience and a relationship with a money source... and be legal in all states except WI which requires a license

 Thank you gentlemen for your candid responses. I got exactly what I needed from the post. I really needed a "deep-dive" understanding of the dissension toward Wholesalers. And now...I truly get it.  

Good day sirs!

Originally posted by @Richard C. :

 With respect, the fact that you say you want to wholesale because you don't want to do what a realtor does is proof that you don't know all that much about the real estate industry.  Because wholesalers and Realtors do exactly the same thing.  The only difference is the mechanism by which they get paid.  And a license and a code of ethics, of course.  But they perform the same function.

I do want to respond directly to this statement (then I'm done on this subject). And I'm only responding to this because now I feel you are personally attacking my intelligence. There are a select few wholesalers that are doing exactly what realtors are doing, which puts them in violation. Yes, they should be reported, reprimanded, fined, thrown off a bridge, whatever. As for me and my business model, which you know nothing about, is nowhere near what a realtor does; nor is it the same as any other normal wholesaler. So, no, I will not accept that "wholesalers" and "Realtors" do exactly the same thing.

Good day sir! 

@Andy Cross , what @Richard C. first said!

As for when you wrote: "Soliciting cash buyers? No, ... I obtained those cash buyers by marketing my wholesaling business" - how is that (much) different to soliciting?

Please let us know when you DO "land that first deal" (and of course, have the ability to close it into your name even when your cash buyers desert you). Cheers...

Andy and Andrew,

Most WS gurus should be in jail, not the naive inexperienced victims of their unethical and illegal methods, but if those followers go out into the public screwing up, they too need to be tossed out of the real estate industry. We aren't protecting commissions, we are protecting the public, the source and foundation of the industry.

WS is NOT an industry, it is a service within an industry.

I'm not going into long posts every three days on BP to drill through this bad rap stuff as there are already a thousand posts covering this.

I've noticed too, that most of those wanting to WS are young, nothing against youth, I was young once! I was also immature, naive, ready to set the world on fire with my energy and drive, had no education and no money! All that changed in time.

The road to hell is paved with good intentions. 

Seems most here are driven by financial expectations, glorified in the almighty dollar baptised in the guru books. It's the wrong way to start in real estate or any career for that matter. Yes, money is important, and yes, a lot of money can be EARNED in real estate, but money is a by-product of the primary purpose of being in real estate. 

Why does a lawyer become a lawyer or a doctor become a doctor? Certainly they understand the monetary propensity (ability to earn money) but that isn't the only reason professionals choose a career. Both have a desire to contribute to society to assist others and succeed at that. When that fire in your belly is ignited by your willingness to contribute to, rather than take from society, the money will come regardless of what you do in business.

You'll see me saying real estate is unique unlike any other business. What real property is is the earth beneath your feet! Our entire society is built on it, socially, legally and economically. Did it every dawn on you newbies that wars have been fought over territory or real estate? When was the last time you heard of a war being fought over a car or a jacket or pair of shoes? Real estate is a social business, not a widget business.

That's why we have special laws in real estate, our legal system in this industry goes back to the 13th Century! And newbies or deal makers in wholesaling are more concerned in how to get around the laws instead of simply complying with the laws and move on in their career. That's the mentality of con artists and snake oil salesmen. And it is contrary to the public good and an ethical society.       

Did anyone learn anything in school about the U.S. Constitution? The right to own property and benefit from that ownership? A land owner's rights are sacred in this country! Again, it is for the public good that the rights of land owners are protected. The right of any economic benefit or real estate first goes to owner's not some buyer's or "investor's" bank account.   You screw over a property owner and you're screwing over every professional in real estate as well as society as a whole. 

There is a difference between getting a good deal and screwing over a property owner stealing their equity. That means your deal must be justified and acceptable as to the amount you "charge" for your services, they need to be in line with similar services in the industry. Fair Goods and Services Act, you're in business!

You need to learn how real value is added to real estate, not these bogus claims by idiots who gouge people for services just because they try to justify it to themselves. A facilitator of a transaction is always just the facilitator, there are long established fees and charges adopted for facilitating any transaction, that is what brokers do.

In the military we say people are promoted to their level of incompetence. Same is true in business, you only succeed to your level of incompetence, then you're stuck there until you educate yourself and can act at a higher level of competence. 

Get an education, a real education, not guru crap, not mentor advice from some old whizbang dealer, but learn real estate before trying to deal in real estate!

And, by the way, soon there won't be any excuses for newbies not to learn the basics of real estate, I'm going to see to that! No excuses! :)   

Free eBook from BiggerPockets!

Ultimate Beginner's Guide Book Cover

Join BiggerPockets and get The Ultimate Beginner's Guide to Real Estate Investing for FREE - read by more than 100,000 people - AND get exclusive real estate investing tips, tricks and techniques delivered straight to your inbox twice weekly!

  • Actionable advice for getting started,
  • Discover the 10 Most Lucrative Real Estate Niches,
  • Learn how to get started with or without money,
  • Explore Real-Life Strategies for Building Wealth,
  • And a LOT more.

Lock We hate spam just as much as you

Create Lasting Wealth Through Real Estate

Join the millions of people achieving financial freedom through the power of real estate investing

Start here