Masters in RE Finance and Development

4 Replies

Good Morning All,

I saw a similar post to this and wanted to ask for some opinions. I am a commercial broker and we specialize in retail leasing and investment sales. My brokerage represents over 80 national brands and dozens of developers who do development for said brands. I learn a whole lot every day just by working, but I have always wanted to complete a Masters and the UW offers a program in Real Estate Finance and Development. I am 26 and would take about 3 years to finish. I would be able to continue working during my schooling. I guess my ultimate questions is, outside of my personal goals to complete a masters, does a Masters in Finance and Development look good enough on a resume AND provide enough knowledge to bring enough value to my clients to increase my brokerage business enough to outbalance the cost of said degree?

Originally posted by @Jameson Sullivan :

Good Morning All,

I saw a similar post to this and wanted to ask for some opinions. I am a commercial broker and we specialize in retail leasing and investment sales. My brokerage represents over 80 national brands and dozens of developers who do development for said brands. I learn a whole lot every day just by working, but I have always wanted to complete a Masters and the UW offers a program in Real Estate Finance and Development. I am 26 and would take about 3 years to finish. I would be able to continue working during my schooling. I guess my ultimate questions is, outside of my personal goals to complete a masters, does a Masters in Finance and Development look good enough on a resume AND provide enough knowledge to bring enough value to my clients to increase my brokerage business enough to outbalance the cost of said degree?

 That depends.

Your experience counts for much more than any degree. Most companies realize that "those who can, DO, those who can't, TEACH"

That means that if the people who were teaching it were any good at it they would be doing it, not teaching it. Most profs have theoretical knowledge, but businesses are profit oriented and looking for experiential knowledge.

I guess that's what draws me to it because I get to learn the theoretical knowledge AND apply it through actually working.

I can't speak to that exact degree, but as someone that can "do" AND someone that can "teach", I have never regretted getting my advanced degrees (I have a doctorate). I teach for two major public universities based on my credentials, which includes many years in the field and my degrees. 

So I would say this: don't go for it simply for money. If you're only looking for more money, then you probably don't need the degrees. But if you like the field and enjoy learning, and can obtain this degree relatively low-cost (I spent virtually nothing on my Masters - I got a scholarship and a fellowship), you're investing in yourself, which is the best investment you'll ever make. 

Note regarding Account Closed's point about teaching: yes, there are a bunch of professors that don't know a lot about practical application, but there are plenty that do and there are plenty of companies that not only value, but pipeline students from academic programs directly into their business model. 

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