Am I being greedy, tenant moved out early

12 Replies

Hello

One of my tenants is moving out 7 months early and broke the lease. They said I can keep the last month rent and also the security deposit. ($1800)

However they did not cut the grass and I will need to hire someone and also should I give them the final water/sewer bill or eat the cost since they let me keep the last month rent and security. I don't want to be greedy since they let me keep 2 months rent but on the other hand I don't want to have to pay the lawn bill and final water/sewer, its not my responsability ($150)

Would you eat the 2 bills or sent it to them?

Thanks

Id eat it. Not worth the hassle for 150.

@Jimmy S.  I would eat it. I collect those things up front for moments like this. If you try to collect, they might fight you more. Since you can probably get this rented with minimal hassle and come out ahead on rent... Id take care of business and move on. Make up the $150 else where. 

I was thinking that same thing. I did not try to collect it or send them the bill. I just wanted to see what you guys thought first.

Seems like nice tenants to me .Forget the 150

you got 1800, worrying about 150 would only cost you more.  I would consider that more than fair

Originally posted by @Pete T. :
you got 1800, worrying about 150 would only cost you more. I would consider that more than fair

I would just send them the bill in the mail and hope they paid it, if not I would forget about it and eat it, but my question was would you still mail them a bill and hope they pay it or just forget all it all together and don't even mail them one.

@Nate M.

I would eat it this time. You can always send the bill in the mail and see what happens. 

 I recommend adding a break lease clause in your next lease. Mine is 60 days notice and 2 months break lease fee. That is the fee to break the lease. This way you can still charge for damages! Otherwise they technically only have to pay any damages and the difference from loss rent (difference between their move out and the next tenant). This has saved me alot of grief and hassle! If it doesn't violate your state law. I highly recommend it.

Interesting choice of words... "They (the tenant) said I can keep the last month rent and also the security deposit. ($1800)" and "since they let me keep 2 months rent". As the landlord, I would be the one to determine what I can and will do, not the tenant.

Unless you have a break lease clause that says otherwise, at a minimum the tenant would typically be responsible for the cost of rent and utilities until you re-lease (provided that you make a good faith effort to re-lease as soon as possible) and for unpaid fees and for any extra cleaning needs and damages.

Seems like their pre-paid last month rent and security deposit is more than enough to cover this. If your actual costs were more, then you would have good reason to send them a bill for the difference. Not worth chasing for such a small amount. Smile at your good fortune (it could have been worse) and move on!

Assuming your lease has a few clauses to protect yourself, I would do what @Jimmy S.  says, you use an interesting choice of words.  Did you ever establish a lease with them?  If so, there should be pre-determined agreements as to how a broken lease works, eg: you keep the sec. deposit and last month's rent.  

Yes I did have a lease with them LOL. It does state in the lease they will forfeit last month rent and security deposit if moving out early/ lease termination. They asked if I would be willing to let them out of the lease early and I could keep the last month rent and security with no hassle if I agreed to sign the lease termination paper and not make them ride out the 5 or 6 months left in the lease.

Yeah I would definitely eat it. The last month rent and security deposit more than covers it. I don't think they were doing you a favor and letting you keep it. It was yours but on the other hand it is definitely high enough to cover those costs.

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