Tree Removal

7 Replies

Does home insurance cover removal of tree. I have 2 trees on my property that are causing ants and are about to fall. 

What is the best way to handle tree removal. 

I have not heard of insurance covering tree removal.  They cover damage from a tree fall, but not removal prior to a fall.  The insurance company can deny a claim if they can prove you were aware of an unsafe tree on your property, so removal is important and comes at your expense.  Perhaps there are exceptions I'm not aware of, hopefully other people chime in on the issue.

Agreed.  Insurance will cover only loss.  They will not provide preventative "maintenance". My advice is to take the tree down at your expense, especially since you know about the infestation.   This could come back to bite you if the tenant can prove you know they were bad trees.

I had the same situation with a tenant, concerned about a tree on the property in which the roots were compromised. I thought if the tree hits the home my insurance would cover it and I would get a new roof out of the deal. But since he notified the property management company about his concern I knew I needed to take action. If I neglected to do something and the tree did come down and injure someone I could be held liable since I was told about the situation. It ended up costing me $450 but also insured me peace of mind!

Something to consider... if it is the type of tree that will produce off-spring, suckers coming up from the ground everywhere... take a lesson from our experience...  

There was a locust tree behind our 8-plex. It was ugly and messy, dropping debris on our tenants' back patios. We decided to have it removed professionally and had the stump grounded. That was in 2011. We are still fighting the suckers coming up from roots that stretch a half block from the original tree. We learned after the fact, when you cut down a tree, drill a hole in the middle of the trunk and poison it with a root killer. After the roots are sufficiently dead, then grind the stump.

About the ants... if they have infested the tree and you remove the tree without killing the colony, they will establish their colony elsewhere. So you may still need to deal with the ant problem even after you get rid of the tree. Best to seek and destroy the colony now, with a pesticide that they will take "home".  There are other BP forum threads about eradicating ants.  Also, check your nearby building structures to make sure the ants have not penetrated your buildings and caused damage there.

Originally posted by @John Geldert :

I had the same situation with a tenant, concerned about a tree on the property in which the roots were compromised. I thought if the tree hits the home my insurance would cover it and I would get a new roof out of the deal. But since he notified the property management company about his concern I knew I needed to take action. If I neglected to do something and the tree did come down and injure someone I could be held liable since I was told about the situation. It ended up costing me $450 but also insured me peace of mind!

 Seriously, you would have let the tree drop on the house on purpose and exposed your tenants to risk of life and limb?  And the only reason why you didn't is that reported it to the PM? I hope you are kidding!

@Andrew S.  

No I was not exposing my tenants to "risk of life and limb"! I HAVE MORE INTEGRITY THAN THAT.... Had two professional tree inspectors look at the tree and assure me the tree was in stable condition also noting that due to the grading of the property the tree would fall away from the home, not to mention the tree was almost 50yards from the house.  It's located on a "wooded" lot with another 25 trees in proximity. I did have the tree removed, only to go back and find the tenants now park additional cars in that space, maybe that's just a coincidence.... But thank you for chiming in on this forum!

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