Chicago Winter and Drafty Windows

13 Replies

HI BP Nation, 

How do you handle old drafty windows?

This is tricky, for I can't assure to completely seal the old windows. Maybe I can offer to pay for some materials. I would gladly pay for something like this:

https://www.amazon.com/3M-Indoor-Window-Insulator-5-Window/dp/B00002NCJI/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1389974208&sr=8-2&keywords=window+insulation+film&tag=apartmentth0a-20

What have you done with your tenants living in vintage places?

Thanks, 

Frank

thanks for the link. I just placed an order

I’ve used that for a few winters. It works pretty well, but is a bit challenging to install and often leaves behind residue. You must be sure to dust/clean the area that you are going to apply the double sided tape to or it won’t stick for long. Once the air seal is broken, it’s essentially useless. Also, since the tape is so sticky, if you start to apply it at the wrong angle, you’re better off starting over. There’s also the issue that it ruins your view. If it’s not perfectly tight, which you can do by shrinking the plastic with a hairdryer, there are plastic creases and wrinkles. If someone doesn’t have the patience for all that (or a ladder tall enough to safely get to the top of the window), it’s not incommon to give up in frustration....or so I’m told. Eh hem. Unfortunately, while it’s by no means perfect, it’s the best product I’ve seen. 

I used them when I was a renter - I never thought of asking my landlord to pay for it

We've used it on one of our vintage houses that had leaky windows.  It seemed to work fine at cutting back on the drafts but then, we're in the deep south, not the cold Chicago that I grew up in.  And yes; the tape can be a pain.

Gail

Originally posted by @Les Rorick :

I’ve used that for a few winters. It works pretty well, but is a bit challenging to install and often leaves behind residue. You must be sure to dust/clean the area that you are going to apply the double sided tape to or it won’t stick for long. Once the air seal is broken, it’s essentially useless. Also, since the tape is so sticky, if you start to apply it at the wrong angle, you’re better off starting over. There’s also the issue that it ruins your view. If it’s not perfectly tight, which you can do by shrinking the plastic with a hairdryer, there are plastic creases and wrinkles. If someone doesn’t have the patience for all that (or a ladder tall enough to safely get to the top of the window), it’s not incommon to give up in frustration....or so I’m told. Eh hem. Unfortunately, while it’s by no means perfect, it’s the best product I’ve seen. 

Hi.

I’m looking to invest in South Chicago but a professional  property seems to be a myth in the area. Do your company service the south or any referrals? 

I’d truly appreciate  it.

We've used window heat shrink film, similar to that in your link, and it worked quite well for a sliding patio door as well as smaller windows. We left it on well into spring and it didn't leave a residue. It was very clear and didn't hamper the view... hardly could tell it was there.

We also have one house with storm windows that were specifically made for each window, with a screen too built in. They stay in the windows year round.  The function is similar to a screen door since it has a piece of glass down that slides down in the winter and up in the summer. It's installed on the outside.

The "inwindow" idea makes sense.  So does using rubber weather strip (much better than the foam type). Great thread! Thanks for the ideas.

Be sure not to block egress in case of an emergency. When I was a child we lived in a house built in 1889 and it had wooden double hung windows. Every autumn my father would install storm windows and every spring take them off. The storm windows were numbered and stored in our basement during the summer. They attached by latches on the outside. If there was ever an emergency, we would have had to break through the window pane to get out. Fortunately there are better designs these days!

Originally posted by @Malick Guindo :
Originally posted by @Les Rorick:

I’ve used that for a few winters. It works pretty well, but is a bit challenging to install and often leaves behind residue. You must be sure to dust/clean the area that you are going to apply the double sided tape to or it won’t stick for long. Once the air seal is broken, it’s essentially useless. Also, since the tape is so sticky, if you start to apply it at the wrong angle, you’re better off starting over. There’s also the issue that it ruins your view. If it’s not perfectly tight, which you can do by shrinking the plastic with a hairdryer, there are plastic creases and wrinkles. If someone doesn’t have the patience for all that (or a ladder tall enough to safely get to the top of the window), it’s not incommon to give up in frustration....or so I’m told. Eh hem. Unfortunately, while it’s by no means perfect, it’s the best product I’ve seen. 

Hi.

I’m looking to invest in South Chicago but a professional  property seems to be a myth in the area. Do your company service the south or any referrals? 

I’d truly appreciate  it.

Hi Malick, unfortunately, we do not service South Chicago. I haven’t come across any companies that do. If I do, I’ll be sure to let the BP community know. 

Originally posted by @Les Rorick :

Hi Malick, unfortunately, we do not service South Chicago. I haven’t come across any companies that do. If I do, I’ll be sure to let the BP community know. 

 Thank you, I’m sure it’d appreciated by many.

There are three main options. The temporary film kits you mention, exterior storms and interior storms. The in windows are interior storms. The interior storms do block easy egress. Exterior storms are now normally pemanantly installed and not removed annually. Exterior storms now have metal not wood frames. They come with screens and dont block egress. The interior storms are good choices for old picture and small non opening windows. Film is great if you are not the owner or you want a temporary fix. I wouldnt want to do every year but that is me, it is effective you just have to judge if it is worth your time.

Thanks to all for the feedback! There are great product recommendations. 

The place has dual exterior storm windows. Those can be removed from the interior.  I notified the tenant to confirm storm windows were in place; then, I sent product recommendations.  I think he forgot to install the bedroom bottom one. 

After some soul searching, we decided to not buy any additional products and to not install them, either. It's up to them to do this.  I don't want to create more work /cost for us.  So far,  they haven't complained. 

Thanks again, 

Frank

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