Return missed calls when they don't leave a voicemail?

9 Replies

Do you bother to return missed calls from prospective tenants when they don't leave a message/voicemail? I just recently listed a property and have dozens of calls thus far and only roughly 10% left messages. I feel like if a someone was really interested in the property they'd leave a voicemail and the rest are tire kickers. Am I missing out by not calling them back or saving myself time?

Note: All these calls are from a for rent sign posted outside the property. My online listings have a questionnaire to weed out tire kickers.

Thanks!

My outgoing message is clear that if the caller would like a call back, they should leave a message with their name, number, and reason for calling. No voicemail = no call back. If they can’t follow those simple instructions, don’t want them as a tenant.

Originally posted by @Sam Lucio :

Do you bother to return missed calls from prospective tenants when they don't leave a message/voicemail? I just recently listed a property and have dozens of calls thus far and only roughly 10% left messages. I feel like if a someone was really interested in the property they'd leave a voicemail and the rest are tire kickers. Am I missing out by not calling them back or saving myself time?

Note: All these calls are from a for rent sign posted outside the property. My online listings have a questionnaire to weed out tire kickers.

Thanks!

 A property marketed property should receive much more interest then you would ever want or need. Calling them back would be a waste of time. I consider this to be part of the screening process.  

@Sam Lucio

Although I do agree with what Brad and James had to say I would also like to add in that I think it is a generational thing on if they leave a voicemail.  Older generations typically are more apt to leave a voicemail than younger generations. 

Could it be a waist of time to call them back... possibly but who knows, could be a good long term tenant. 

Continuing with what @Dylan B. said, perhaps you can suggest on your sign to "call or text" as I find that most of my prospective tenants are more comfortable with texting than phone calls.  The whole voicemail thing might be a significant enough "barrier to entry" for some of your future renters, as they are no doubt looking at many other places and you don't want your property to be the fruit way up high in the tree.  It may or may not be to every landlord's liking, but I think one should at least consider trying to adapt to their customers.   Know your clientele and "speak their language."

I say don't bother calling them back, if they didn't leave a voicemail than in my opinion their a tenant I wouldn't event want to deal with. If they don't have the curtesy or are just too lazy to leave a voicemail expressing interest in a home then ask yourself is that really the type of person you want to be dealing with, will they be responsive when you reach out to them, pay on time, or take care of the home with respect. Granted that is a jump from not leaving a voicemail but I truly believe that it speaks to the character of who they are. In response to @Dylan B. I am part of that younger generation, and absolutely agree that it is not the norm when it comes to a personal relationships, but most of the people I know would leave a voicemail when we really want to live in a place knowing that it is the right thing to do, and the ones that don't are ones I wouldn't rent to myself. 

Probably not worth calling back. Why do you miss so many calls?

One bit of information that could play into this is what type of property/area is it in. If you're marketing an A property with a higher average rent chances are the people calling will be a bit more professional and regardless of age leave a message. However if your marketing a section 8 or C/D property the prospective tenants may not be as professional as you would like or may just be younger. To echo what @Dylan B. & @Wesley W. said it could be a generational thing. The big majority of people under 30 would much rather text than call/leave a voicemail. I don't think much of this indicates whether these prospective tenants will be good or not. Makes some calls and do your due diligence... Good Luck! 

Originally posted by @Jonathan G.:

Probably not worth calling back. Why do you miss so many calls?

I work at a petrochemical plant and many of the buildings are explosion proof like bunkers. Very poor service. 

I never called anyone back that didn't leave a message. I got the house rented out within 15 days in the middle of January, I was shocked at the number of people interested in moving during that time of the year.

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