Replacing flooring in rental

10 Replies

I did a search and the information I found was a couple of years old, what are you all currently using for flooring in your rentals?  I am closing on a rental on monday and it has some cheap click together laminate flooring in the living room, nicer tile in the kitchen and bathrooms and worn out carpet in the bedrooms.  I don't know whether to replace with carpet or use some of the vinyl plank products.  What are you using and recommend?  We are just finishing a remodel on another unit and used the lifeproof vinyl from home depot in the bath and laundry room.   Anyone have experience with that product?  Thanks

Not all planks are vinyl, but the vinyl ones have some advantages- 1, they are not destroyed by moisture, and 2. they can take some imperfections in the floor without causing squeeks or damage.  Carpets feel warmer, and actually can take some more abuse than flooring.  If your using commerical grade carpet (i.e. not high pile) you need to clean the carpet every so often- like every 4-6 months, you should use a carpet cleaner. But this depends on the tenant of course.

I'm a big user of vinyl plank flooring. I'm on my 6th year using it. Very durable, cleans up extremely nice. You can always throw a rug over it. 

Best to you

Glue strip Allure that we install ourselves.  I have about 10 boxes in the barn right now.

LifeProof flooring!
It looks great!
Easy to install!
Great for kitchens An baths
Good price point and it's rated for commercial use too.
$2.79 a sqft. Homedepot

@Glen Whipkins I don't think that you'd go wrong with either option.  I have both in different apartments that I own.  What I will say is that if you go the vinyl plank route you should really get ones that are waterproof.  Most of the time it's "Allure" (as mentioned by @Bettina F. ) but I think there are a few similar options. My other recommendation would be that you get the fake-hand-scraped look. You'll get nicks and dings in the flooring that you can fill in with a pen. However, if there are already other "dings" in the form of the fake-hand-scraping it makes the real ones less noticeable. What I've found is that they generally occur in the places that you'd expect, like where a couch sat for a couple of years. The good news is that the new tenant is probably going to put a couch in the same spot and cover the dings that you fill-in. Tile accomplishes the same goal but the standard 12 x 12 ceramic tile is the hallmark (to me) of 80's and 90's rentals so it can look a little dated. That said, I'm not going to tear it up, there isn't much ROI for putting in new tile when the old stuff still is serviceable, cleanable, etc. Whatever you choose, buy an extra box or two and put it away in case you have to patch in the future.

Originally posted by @Glen Whipkins :

I did a search and the information I found was a couple of years old, what are you all currently using for flooring in your rentals?  I am closing on a rental on monday and it has some cheap click together laminate flooring in the living room, nicer tile in the kitchen and bathrooms and worn out carpet in the bedrooms.  I don't know whether to replace with carpet or use some of the vinyl plank products.  What are you using and recommend?  We are just finishing a remodel on another unit and used the lifeproof vinyl from home depot in the bath and laundry room.   Anyone have experience with that product?  Thanks

  •  Vinyl allure
  • Refinished hardwoods

If there is a concrete subfloor I put in tile. If not then vinyl plank. 

I put cheap wood click laminate flooring in a rental back when it was my primary residence.  I even put the stuff in the closets which turned out nice.  The stuff is great, and has survived some abuse, but it's weakness is water.  The central AC drain in the laundry room behind the kitchen stopped up.  By the time it was noticed about half the kitchen floor had water under the laminate, and pad.  It had started to warp, and I had to rip it all up.  The little strips on the side that click together were destroyed by water they just broke in pieces.  

The pad and laminate raised the floor just enough for the water to go under it.  Had I went with cheap vinyl it would have rolled right over the top, and been seen much sooner.  I replaced the kitchen with peel and stick 12x12 vinyl. 

I use cheap click together laminate flooring.

I have used vinyl planks and they are great.  It is in our home and in a rental, so far.  I have used a few brands, such as sold in Lowes and Home Depot.  They can take a lot of abuse, are waterproof and don't have to be replaced or cleaned, such as carpet.  I would never use laminate, because some day they will get wet and ruined.  

For a fix and flip, I might use a little less expensive vinyl product, maybe.

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