Anyone regret evicting someone?

18 Replies

I have a inherited tenant that has been paying on time, but has given me fits avout clraning up his yard and loose dogs. I was so relived that he told me he was leaving! I may have pushed him out, and hope I don’t regret it. There will be a lot of repairs but it was a little under market. Anyone regret pushing out a tenant?

Never.  I have regretted not evicting in several instances.  In the Army, if you think you need a haircut; you need a haircut.  As a property owner, if you think you need to evict someone; you need to evict. 

Originally posted by @Terrell Garren :

Never.  I have regretted not evicting in several instances.  In the Army, if you think you need a haircut; you need a haircut.  As a property owner, if you think you need to evict someone; you need to evict. 

I like this response..  

@Chad C. There would never be a possibility of regretting eviction as you don't have a way of knowing what would have happened if you didn't evict. That said, eviction is a costly and inefficient process. There are cases where I am happy I didn't evict because tenant payed the amount after 2 months and there are also cases where I should have evicted sooner. Once you have several units there is also a question of uniform rules. Eviction then becomes a process that is triggered automatically rather than a rational decision.

As Terrell and Wayne point out your greatest regrets will be not evicting soon enough or not evicting at all. In this business your regrets will be from not taking action.

Evictions eliminate problems. Never second guess your decisions and you never have regrets.

@Chad C. if a tenant is not positively responding to reasonable landlord requests, the tenant will just be trouble long term. You didn't evict them. It is better if they leave of their own. Tenants are easy to find, so any pain here is just short term financial for the turn over costs.

I have never regretted evicting or not renewing a tenant.

Since I self manage, I take the "managing" aspect of that seriously. To that end, I often self-evaluate to see if I could do anything (creative or out of the box) to turn a bad situation around. Sometimes you can manage a so-so tenant into being a decent tenant and avoid the headache and cost of a turnover.

Eviction is a difficult and expensive process. By the time I get to the point of evicting, it's a huge relief to have it done and the problem tenant out of my hair forever! No, I've never regretted.

@Chad C. If making decisions and implementing your decisions based on a sound business model, I find you should never regret. Basing your decisions on hunches and emotions may lead to some regrets.

I would highly suggest outlining and documenting (on paper) your policies, procedures, and core values for your investment business. 

This will allow you to uses data to make decisions not emotions. 

Most failed landlords are good people who followed their feelings. 

Let a late fee slide here, a month there, and BAM. 

Your lease should state what condition the lawn is to be kept on as well as any pet policies. This makes this a non confrontational business discussion vs a "fit". 

"Mr/Mrs. Seller section X states you are to do Y. You are in violation of your lease and this needs  to be corrected immediately."

We had a tenant we could have evicted (they were behind on rent), but they were month-to-month and we terminated their lease with 30 days notice.  They moved out peacefully, left the place sparkling clean, and thanked us for not taking them to court.  In that situation, I was glad I didn't jump straight to an eviction.   

We have also evicted a tenant.  No regrets.